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  1. #16
    Senior Member Involved Member Herkku's Avatar
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    Has anyone read the new book of J. K.Rowling, intended for adults? Have you read her Harry Potter books?

  2. #17
    Senior Member Veteran Member Aksel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herkku View Post
    Has anyone read the new book of J. K.Rowling, intended for adults? Have you read her Harry Potter books?
    I've read the Harry Potter books several times. Great fun. And I'm still waiting for my copy of The Casual Vacancy. Stupid Amazon says it won't arrive until November.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herkku View Post
    Has anyone read the new book of J. K.Rowling, intended for adults? Have you read her Harry Potter books?
    I haven't read her new book (and probably won't), but I did read the entire Harry Potter series twice. It was very good, but I won't say that it is a masterpiece of English literature. Very engaging story line, and the entire plotline very much felt like it was well thought through - I will say, though, that the ending left me a little befuddled. That being said, I think there is a large difference between writing for adults and for a target audience in the pre-pubescent and adolescent age group. Some can do it - C. S. Lewis successfully did it. Tolkien also wrote the Hobbit intended for children, while the Lord of the Rings was more of an adult book. I don't know whether Rowling can do it as well, but I have too many things on my wish reading list to get to this any time soon.

  4. #19
    Schigolch
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    Reading this:



    An interesting essay on the frontiers of the Roman Empire.

  5. #20
    Senior Member Involved Member Tardis's Avatar
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    Terry Pratchett and his Discworld series are excellent.

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  7. #21
    Senior Member Involved Member Tardis's Avatar
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    To add to the sci-fi authors list
    Jack Vance's Tales of the Dying Earth is very good.
    A personal favorite is Mike Resnick.
    Another is Roger Zelazny, especially his book Lord of Light.
    Ray Bradbury, obviously. RIP
    Frederik Pohl, his Gateway series.


    Quote Originally Posted by DrMike View Post
    I have read much sci-fi in my day. The Dune saga is a must - the first is obviously the best, but the whole series is worth reading. By that, I mean Frank's books. I find they may take multiple readings to truly digest what the grand plan is. The latter books take a bit more will power to plunge through, but are worth it. The "prequels" and "conclusions" written by his son and Kevin J. Anderson are worthy and interesting books in their own right, but I am loathe to credit them with being honest depictions of what Frank had in mind. They are a bit too cut and dry and simplistic compared to what Frank wrote.

    Asimov is a must. The Foundation series is excellent, as well as the Robot books.

    Many love the Ender series from Orson Scott Card - I read the first, Ender's Game, and was not as impressed with it as some, but still it should not be overlooked.

    Philip K. Dick is also a great one to read. His book, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, was the inspiration for the movie Bladerunner, and many of his short stories have been made into movies (Paycheck, Total Recall, Minority Report, A Scanner Darkly - there may be more, those are what I could remember off the top of my head).

    Arthur C. Clarke - I enjoyed his 2001 series. If the whole intro part of the movie with the primates confused you, read the book - it made more sense to me than Kubrick's film.

    Heinlein - He is justifiably considered (along with Asimov and a few others) as one of the giants of sci-fi. I have not read many of his books, including his perhaps most famous one (Stranger in a Strange Land), but The Moon is a Harsh Mistress is a great story, especially for those who tend to favor a more libertarian political view (Heinlein was very much so).

    William Gibson's Neuromancer is a great book, but it takes some getting used to. If the concept behind the Matrix interested you, then this book is a must, and you will recognize some of the ideas in the Matrix emerging here first.

  8. #22
    Schigolch
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    On the Dying Earth's subgenre, I particularly like the tretalogy of Gene Wolfe: The Book of the New Sun.

  9. #23
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    Balzac is favourite writer of mine. Rastignac or Brideau are like old friends to me. From all I did read so far from him I loved Lost Illusions the most. I'm currently at "poor relatives" cycle, Cousin Pons and it's quite possible I won't stop until I read whole oevure, which is a lot to read, as you may know.

    I've been reading some Napoleonic period stuff recently, now I'm at book about Michel Ney and memoirs of Philippe Paul de Ségur.

    I don't like modern literature because it's pretentious crap devoid of tail-coats, hussars, sensitive damsels in enormous dresses etc, that is: the essence of literature.

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  11. #24
    Senior Member Veteran Member Aksel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne of Green Gables View Post
    I don't like modern literature because it's pretentious crap devoid of tail-coats, hussars, sensitive damsels in enormous dresses etc, that is: the essence of literature.
    You should read Susanna Clarke's Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. Plenty of tail-coats and swooning ladies. And a bit of embroidery.

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  13. #25
    Schigolch
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    If you are a middle-aged SF fan, it's difficult you won't love this one:


  14. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aksel View Post
    You should read Susanna Clarke's Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. Plenty of tail-coats and swooning ladies. And a bit of embroidery.
    Not a bad book, but boy could it have used some shortening. There is character development, and then there is filibustering. It takes a good deal of perseverance to get to the point where the book starts rewarding you. I'm not opposed to long books, so long as the authors can justify the length by moving the plot along. This one really tested my patience.

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    I'll put in a plug for the works of Cormac McCarthy. I haven't read all of his books - just The Road and No Country for Old Men - but I have been fairly impressed with them. There is both action and thought-provoking passages in these books. I highly recommend them.

  16. #28
    Senior Member Veteran Member Aksel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrMike View Post
    Not a bad book, but boy could it have used some shortening. There is character development, and then there is filibustering. It takes a good deal of perseverance to get to the point where the book starts rewarding you. I'm not opposed to long books, so long as the authors can justify the length by moving the plot along. This one really tested my patience.
    I loved it! Although I have a thing for two-page footnotes.

  17. #29
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    I am now reading "Witness" by Whittaker Chambers. I will admit with shame that, as a diehard conservative, it has taken me nearly 40 years to read this work.

  18. #30
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrMike View Post
    I'll put in a plug for the works of Cormac McCarthy. I haven't read all of his books - just The Road and No Country for Old Men - but I have been fairly impressed with them. There is both action and thought-provoking passages in these books. I highly recommend them.
    Cormac McCarthy write beautifully. But approach The Road with care. There are scenes from that book that will stay with me for ever, dammit.
    Natalie

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