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Thread: Eduard Nápravník - Dubrovsky (1960) Abridged & Composite Versions, English, Russian and German subtitles

          
   
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    Senior Member Involved Member Nervous Gentleman's Avatar
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    Eduard Nápravník - Dubrovsky (1960) Abridged & Composite Versions, English, Russian and German subtitles

    Eduard Nápravník - Dubrovsky (1960) Abridged, English, Russian and German subtitles

    Eduard Nápravník (1839-1916)
    "Dubrovsky"
    Opera in 4 acts, 5 scenes. Op. 58
    Libretto by Modest Tchaikovsky (based on an unfinished novel by Alexander Pushkin).

    Andrey Dubrovsky - Georgy Dudarev
    Vladimir, his son - Sergei Lemeshev
    Troekurov - Alexei Ivanov
    Masha, his daughter - Vera Kudryavtseva
    Prince Vereisky - Pavel Mokeev
    Superintendent - Mikhail Tyuremnov
    Assessor - Vladimir Popov
    Desforges - Nikolai Timchenko
    Shabashkin - Roman Krasnoyurchenko
    Yegorovna - Anna Vassilieva
    Arkhip - Evgeny Korneev
    Grishka - Ivan Zorin
    Anton - Leonid Boldin
    Tanya - Ruslana Oreshkina

    Choir and Orchestra of the Moscow Academic Musical Theatre
    Conductor - Peter Slavinsky

    This is the original telefilm, with custom English subtitles, of an abridged version of the opera (so far as is known, this is the first time that this opera has ever been translated in English).

    It is directed by Vitaly Golovin, who earlier in the same year directed a condensed version of Anton Rubinstein's "The Demon," also with Sergei Lemeshev and available here (with custom English subtitles): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XX9CU8bQKuI.

    Subtitle Credits:

    Translated from the Russian by Andrew Zavodskikh, Andrei Lozinski and Paul Greif.

    The French text in Act III was translated by Natalie Greenly.

    Subtitle timings by Paul Greif.

    The spoken credits were translated by Philipp Reznikov (http://sub-opera.narod.ru/), who also subtitled the extracts from Pushkin's original narrative (substituting the equivalent lines in English from the translation by T. Keane, first published in 1894).

    The Russian subtitles (forthcoming) were transcribed by me from the vocal score published in 1972 and were proofread by Andrew.

    The German subtitles (forthcoming) are transcribed verbatim from a German/Russian vocal score published in 1902.

    To view subtitles, click "CC" on bottom right of player. I recommend you use the most updated version of Google Chrome.




    Upcoming Composite Version:

    The cuts to the score come "fast and furious" in the original telefilm. Consequently, this abridged version of "Dubrovsky" will soon be followed by a special composite version of the same video, but with as much of the excised music reinstated as possible and fully subtitled in English and Russian. The composite incorporates all of the remaining music from the 1960 recording sessions that served as the basis for the telefilm, as well as additions from two other recordings (the only other recordings of the entire opera in circulation): the 1949 studio recording with Ivan Kozlovsky and a 1966 live recording with Vladimir Kravtsov. These restored sections of music will be accompanied either by still photos from the telefilm or footage from the classic 1935 non-opera Soviet film version of Pushkin's original story (the original telefilm already contains numerous excerpts from this film), as well as other Russian films from the period.

    The purpose of the composite is to create as complete a video presentation of the opera as possible, fully subtitled in English, Russian, German, etc. (if anyone would like to volunteer to translate the subtitles into a language of your choice, please contact me). There were, however, numerous cuts to the score (some amounting to many pages) in all of the sources listed above and for which no recording could be located. It is probable that these sections have never been recorded at all. These missing sections will be noted in the subtitles.

    Despite the absence of these sections, the composite is still about 55 minutes longer than the original, abridged version presented here.

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    Senior Member Involved Member Nervous Gentleman's Avatar
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    I am happy to announce that French subtitles have been added to the video newly translated from the Russian and English by pianist Elise Bachour.



    http://operalively.com/forums/showth...8492#post28492

    Of course, her work inspires me to finish the composite (as well as my many other subtitle projects) which has been on hiatus the past five months or so.

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    Senior Member Involved Member Nervous Gentleman's Avatar
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    It took me six months, but I finally completed the German subs and added them to the video.

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    Opera Lively Coordinator - Donor Member Top Contributor Member tyroneslothrop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nervous Gentleman View Post
    Upcoming Composite Version:

    The cuts to the score come "fast and furious" in the original telefilm. Consequently, this abridged version of "Dubrovsky" will soon be followed by a special composite version of the same video, but with as much of the excised music reinstated as possible and fully subtitled in English and Russian. The composite incorporates all of the remaining music from the 1960 recording sessions that served as the basis for the telefilm, as well as additions from two other recordings (the only other recordings of the entire opera in circulation): the 1949 studio recording with Ivan Kozlovsky and a 1966 live recording with Vladimir Kravtsov. These restored sections of music will be accompanied either by still photos from the telefilm or footage from the classic 1935 non-opera Soviet film version of Pushkin's original story (the original telefilm already contains numerous excerpts from this film), as well as other Russian films from the period.

    The purpose of the composite is to create as complete a video presentation of the opera as possible, fully subtitled in English, Russian, German, etc. (if anyone would like to volunteer to translate the subtitles into a language of your choice, please contact me). There were, however, numerous cuts to the score (some amounting to many pages) in all of the sources listed above and for which no recording could be located. It is probable that these sections have never been recorded at all. These missing sections will be noted in the subtitles.

    Despite the absence of these sections, the composite is still about 55 minutes longer than the original, abridged version presented here.
    How is the composite version coming? On the bus back from catching Taneyev's Oresteia in the wee hours of this morning, I met someone else who is a Russian opera nut, who has seen over 100 different Russian operas, and we spent time talking about your work with subtitling Dubrovsky. I also mentioned your composite project and we agreed this would be highly interesting, given that it is unlikely this work will be staged again anytime soon, even in Russia.
    “The hand of Providence creeps among the stars, giving Slothrop the finger.”
    ― Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

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