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  1. #241
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    On the other hand, Abbate and Parker do engage in some weird opinions at times. I don't own this book but I've discussed some parts of it with one of the Opera Lively members by PM and I can't say I agree with some of the stuff they say. I wouldn't remember the specifics right now but I seem to remember that there is a general sense of what I would call "musicologist elitism" that rubbed me the wrong way. What would you say to that, Nat?
    I'm on chapter 4 and haven't noticed that at all so far...
    Natalie

  2. #242
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    I'm on chapter 4 and haven't noticed that at all so far...
    Well of course not, since you yourself are one of the musicologically elite!

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  4. #243
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    I've read it and enjoyed it. I think one of the critics' complaints is that they rather dismiss the whole of contemporary opera.

    I, of course, didn't much notice...

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  6. #244
    Junior Member Newcomer
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    A really good book is the one written by Joseph Volpe about his time as GM of the Met!

    http://www.amazon.com/Toughest-Show-...s=joseph+volpe


    Orestis Sinis
    Last edited by Soave_Fanciulla; January 10th, 2016 at 03:12 AM. Reason: removed promotional url

  7. #245
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Festat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    On the other hand, Abbate and Parker do engage in some weird opinions at times. I don't own this book but I've discussed some parts of it with one of the Opera Lively members by PM and I can't say I agree with some of the stuff they say. I wouldn't remember the specifics right now but I seem to remember that there is a general sense of what I would call "musicologist elitism" that rubbed me the wrong way. What would you say to that, Nat?
    It's been a long time since I finished it but I did not feel that way either. I think the book is very readily accessible. It doesn't require any previous knowledge of music theory to be understood and familiarity with all the many works cited, while certainly an advantage, isn't crucial to follow their text.

    I'm curious to know what are the points you disagree with, though.

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  9. #246
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Festat's Avatar
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    This is very nice, but very abstract. It isn't properly about opera, but rather a reconception of sound and music, as an event more so than an object, through a handful of contemporary classical vocal pieces that to a greater or lesser extent do not conform to our naturalised notion of music and sound. I work capturing sound for cinema, which naturally makes me very attracted to and concerned about the voice since 90% of the work is listening to and recording voices, and the book as a whole was very revealing to me. Some of it also enlightens my academic research about the connections of opera and melodrama as an audiovisual genre, which are apparently opposites — melodrama is the failure of the voice when confronted with emotions while opera is its triumph — but conjoin in the sense that both, in their climaxes, are the dissolution of speech.

    Last edited by Festat; September 3rd, 2016 at 09:24 AM.

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  11. #247
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Interesting review of a biography of Ryan Speedo Green

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/enter...b5d_story.html
    "The world calls them its singers and poets and artists and storytellers; but they are just people who have never forgotten the way to fairyland."
    Lucy Maud Montgomery

  12. #248
    Senior Member Involved Member jflatter's Avatar
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    Has anyone read this? Interesting book on the man and gives an insight into some of the musical politics at La Scala and record labels post war as well.Name:  41b0Bjp-TlL._SX334_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
Views: 87
Size:  26.2 KB

  13. #249
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jflatter View Post
    Has anyone read this? Interesting book on the man and gives an insight into some of the musical politics at La Scala and record labels post war as well.Name:  41b0Bjp-TlL._SX334_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
Views: 87
Size:  26.2 KB
    No! Thanks James, it looks interesting.

  14. #250
    Senior Member Involved Member jflatter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ann Lander (sospiro) View Post
    No! Thanks James, it looks interesting.
    He was an ardent anti fascist as well, who was in hiding during the latter years of the war.

  15. #251
    Senior Member Involved Member jflatter's Avatar
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    Name:  41RUHF7SAqL._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
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    Oh I don't know about this...

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  17. #252
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    My local public library had a book sale today - used books for $2 hardcover and $1 paperback.

    I scored for $2 a large, thick book (1,474 pages) with 101 opera librettos in original language (mostly) and side-by-side English translation; it includes most major works and a few more obscure works. Many of them can be found online of course but it is nice to have it all in one source, especially when watching YouTube operas without subtitles so that the opera can be full screen on the computer while I consult the libretto. Nice! My copy is in excellent form; it doesn't look like a library book.

    Some strange features: omissions - for example Così fan tutte is not there - while these are included: Paderewski's Manru and Horatio Parker's Mona. Unfortunately some Russian operas are given in Italian with English translation - Prince Igor, Boris Godunov, Evgeny Onegin. While Verdi is under-represented, all ten mature Wagner operas are there. There are some typos and mistakes.

    But for $2... hard to complain. This book is available on Amazon (also used) from various sources, with prices between $14 and $17 before shipping. Some sources have it as expensive as $107, probably the original price.



    I also got an illustrated biography of Wagner.

    Off-topic for this thread, but regarding non-operatic music, I got for $2 a superb, illustrated Oxford Companion to Music (it is a large dictionary of musical terms with detailed explanations). $17.50 on Amazon before shipping.




    I got for $2 a guide to orchestral music for non-musicians (quite interesting; will enhance my understanding of orchestras and performing styles - there is a chapter for that - and all the major works get a couple of paragraphs explaining some features of the music - also available on Amazon for $15.50, Prime shipping), and also for $2 a history of Western music.



    For the Wagner one I spent $1 and didn't do much better than Amazon where used it is sold for under $1.50 - but typically there are some $4 for shipping charges, so, still... and my copy is like new. Really, it looks like it was never even opened, so new it looks. I guess Wagner isn't very popular among the library patrons. The other four books are a bit more banged up but minimally, all in great shape.



    This one, the History of Western Music, is quite expensive in its 9th edition; $112 new - what I got is a more modest 3rd edition but hey, for $2...



    $9 total, five great books!
    Last edited by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva); April 8th, 2017 at 06:28 PM.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  18. #253
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    A great haul, especially at those prices!

    I've found similar secondhand bargains in the past: an earlier edition of that same History of Music; a Music through the Ages, a book on Symphonic Music; and the Concise Oxford Dictionary of Opera. "One man's trash . . ."

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  20. #254
    Senior Member Involved Member Nemorino's Avatar
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    Mordden's "A Guide to Orchestral Music" is a real, pick-up-and-read-a-random-page treasure. The concise descriptions are so well-written for the layperson, that they are still regularly reproduced in program notes for orchestras in my area.

    Come to think of it, it was probably what led me to several of my now-favorite composers, like Bartok, when I was a teenager. : )

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  22. #255
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Nice haul Luiz!

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