Page 35 of 35 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35
Results 511 to 525 of 525

Thread: Contemporary Opera

          
   
    Bookmark and Share
  1. #511
    Opera Lively Coordinator - Donor Member Top Contributor Member tyroneslothrop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,451
    Post Thanks / Like
    Eric Banks's Heron and the Salmon Girl performed at the Seattle Repertory Theatre (2013): (actual opera starts at 17:41)
    “The hand of Providence creeps among the stars, giving Slothrop the finger.”
    ― Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

  2. #512
    Opera Lively Coordinator - Donor Member Top Contributor Member tyroneslothrop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,451
    Post Thanks / Like
    Gil Shohat's Alpha and Omega performed at the Israeli Opera (2001):
    “The hand of Providence creeps among the stars, giving Slothrop the finger.”
    ― Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

  3. #513
    Opera Lively Coordinator - Donor Member Top Contributor Member tyroneslothrop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,451
    Post Thanks / Like
    Vitaly Galutva's (Виталий Галутва) Return of Odysseus (Возвращение Одиссея) performed at the National Institute of Dramatic Art (2001):
    “The hand of Providence creeps among the stars, giving Slothrop the finger.”
    ― Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

  4. #514
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Berkhamsted, UK
    Posts
    4,049
    Post Thanks / Like
    After reading the Opera Lively articles on George Benjamin's Written on Skin and the interview with the composer, I am interested to learn more. Almaviva said "top three" but what are the most important contemporary pieces? Any suggestions for CD recordings would be appreciated (I still haven't sorted out my DVD player (lack of) issue.

  5. #515
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    3,647
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    After reading the Opera Lively articles on George Benjamin's Written on Skin and the interview with the composer, I am interested to learn more. Almaviva said "top three" but what are the most important contemporary pieces? Any suggestions for CD recordings would be appreciated (I still haven't sorted out my DVD player (lack of) issue.
    You can get a no-frills DVD player for about the cost of a single DVD. Might be worth taking the plunge.

  6. #516
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Berkhamsted, UK
    Posts
    4,049
    Post Thanks / Like
    Yes I think it is definitely worth taking the plunge sometime soon ( a "what DVD player do you use" thread should come up in the future) but I am still interested to hear other community members favourite contemporary operas. I am thinking of Written on Skin but am looking for other ideas. Anyone?

  7. #517
    treemaker
    Guest
    Have you discussed "Two Boys"...opera by Nico Muhly, libretto by Craig Lucas. Directed by Bartlett Sher. Received its English National Opera premiere in 2011. Scheduled to receive its Met debut on Oct 21st.

    What may I offer you.....HERE is a small preview video.

    I would be interested in knowing more. I'll keep looking around for more information.

  8. #518
    Senior Member Involved Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Southeast Pennsylvania
    Posts
    134
    Post Thanks / Like
    a modest, powerful piece
    Aperghis - Tourbillons

    for solo soprano with video (and feed)
    performed by donatienne michel-danzac

  9. #519
    Senior Member Involved Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Southeast Pennsylvania
    Posts
    134
    Post Thanks / Like
    would anyone know about Aperghis L'echarpe Rouge with libretto by Alain Badiou? doesn't seem to be recordings.

  10. #520
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    9,081
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    After reading the Opera Lively articles on George Benjamin's Written on Skin and the interview with the composer, I am interested to learn more. Almaviva said "top three" but what are the most important contemporary pieces? Any suggestions for CD recordings would be appreciated (I still haven't sorted out my DVD player (lack of) issue.
    For top three other than Written on Skin, I'd say L'Amour de Loin, and Luce Mie Traditrici; both exist on CD and on DVD.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  11. #521
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    9,081
    Post Thanks / Like
    Reading my post above, I think I should say top five and include Satyagraha and Dialogue des Carmélites (oldish, from 1956, but still qualifies as post WWII).
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  12. #522
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Berkhamsted, UK
    Posts
    4,049
    Post Thanks / Like
    Gosh, that's like one of those mystery letters that got lost in the postal service and then gets delivered years later...

    Well, 28 months later, I love the L'Amour de Loin, like the Satyagraha and Dialogue des Carmélites sends my whole world in to darkness. I still haven't got round to Luce Mie Traditrici yet.

    Thank you for the pointers as always...

  13. Likes Hoffmann liked this post
  14. #523
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,234
    Post Thanks / Like
    The Winter's Tale is a new opera composed by Ryan Wigglesworth and based on the Shakespeare play. It's being staged by ENO and the premiere is on 27 February.

    Some more information here and Iain Paterson's blog is worth reading too.

  15. Likes MAuer, Soave_Fanciulla liked this post
  16. #524
    Member Member Nemorino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    73
    Post Thanks / Like
    A post on new operas I’ve seen performed here in Texas over the last year. I didn’t review them when they came out for various reasons; for one thing, reviewing a performance of a brand new work is very difficult.

    I am only reviewing the opera itself – in case any of you have a chance to see one in the future – and giving a general impression of the composers.

    First, Jake Heggie. I’ve seen more operas by Heggie than any other living composer, because his work is performed pretty often in Houston, Dallas, and Austin. He’s a reliable composer who, above all, has a knack for writing good vocal music that singers want to sing. He’s had 2 world premieres in Texas in the last 18 months, although neither feels quite as good, or as iconic, as Dead Man Walking or Moby-Dick. The disappointment has been partly due to the choices of subject, and to an increased use of pastiche which is maybe not one of his strengths.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    JAKE HEGGIE – IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE

    This is a pretty faithful adaptation of the classic movie, with one major exception. Clarence the Angel is now Clara, so that a soprano can be the co-lead with a tenor. The story is told from her perspective instead of George Bailey’s, which helps the opera to dispense with all of the potential scene changes. Clara leads George Bailey through his life by opening a series of doors – think This Is Your Life, or… Bluebeard’s Castle – from which various characters appear and re-enact events on a minimalistic, cosmic stage.

    The opening chorus of angels is aurally arresting, and there is a non-singing part for God (over loudspeaker) which could lend itself to stunt casting. When Clara takes George Bailey into the alternate universe where he had never been born, the opera underlines this grim version of events by completely ceasing all music. The effect of being plunged suddenly into a music-less play is striking, and there was an echo-y hollowness to how the singers were mic’ed for dialogue that further added to the oppressive weight of atmosphere in these scenes.

    Set in the same era as the original movie, Heggie uses a lot of pastiche of period song styles – a school fight song, big band jazz - but unfortunately his versions are not that musically interesting. The worst is a tropical-tinged Charleston knock-off “The Mekee-Mekee” which I personally found unbearable (and it just kept returning…). But the opera did capture the spirit of Christmas, and I can see it making the rounds of U.S. opera companies in coming years, as staging a Christmas opera seems to be the easiest sell to audiences for a modern opera. After taking their bows, the cast and conductor led the audience in singing Auld Lang Syne, and it was a nice moment which I hope future productions duplicate as a tradition, and tribute to the movie.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    JAKE HEGGIE – GREAT SCOTT

    A comic opera about the relevance of opera in our time, Great Scott is about fictional diva Arden Scott returning to her hometown for the world premiere of a long-lost bel canto opera, which is upstaged by the Super Bowl. (This opera was perfect for its Dallas premiere audience.) We are meant to question why opera is relevant when it struggles to connect to new audiences. Then, Arden reconnects with an old flame, Sid Taylor, who ends up skipping the Super Bowl for her premiere and discovering that, hey, OPERA’S PRETTY COOL.

    The premiere run of this opera had a great cast, and Heggie gave all of them great moments. The soprano plays an over-eager, wanna-be diva, who winds up singing the National Anthem at the Super Bowl and adding a hilarious amount of coloratura to it. A countertenor plays a gay stage manager; my eyes rolled a bit about the obviousness of equating countertenor with effeminate, but the character is well-written so it’s not too egregious (however, subsequent performances may not be so well-drawn, and it would be a shame to see it devolve into a stereotype).

    In one of the weaker numbers, two characters get into a competition about who knows more about opera by naming a famous opera character for every letter of the alphabet. It’s a turn-off to potential audiences who know nothing about opera (I know, because I took my brother along to see this), and frankly it wasn’t all that entertaining to me, either.

    Other scenes are also potentially only amusing if you know the operatic clichés they are sending up. But this isn’t Strauss writing Capriccio at the end of his career, genuinely able to outdo his predecessors. Heggie’s send-ups go straight for the cheap gag, and his pastiches are not particularly interesting. The opera-within-an-opera (the bel canto heroine has a mad scene and is then chucked into a volcano) does not further the main plot in any way while it is going on. How much better might it have been if Sid Taylor showed up in a box in the audience and sang his internal reactions to the audience antiphonally?

    It is an entertaining show, but too long, and not an opera that I think will “age” well, unless Heggie edits it a bit.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Despite misgivings about these two shows, I look forward to Heggie’s next opera If I Were You. Based on a 1947 French novel by Julien Green, it is about a man who the devil grants the supernatural power to inhabit another person’s body by singing a secret phrase. The composer states that this will lead to an unusual ensemble cast where many singers each get to become the “lead” character for a time. I think this story plays better to Heggie’s strengths of strong vocal writing and catchy musical motifs.

  17. #525
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    3,123
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Nemorino View Post
    A post on new operas I’ve seen performed here in Texas over the last year. I didn’t review them when they came out for various reasons; for one thing, reviewing a performance of a brand new work is very difficult.

    I am only reviewing the opera itself – in case any of you have a chance to see one in the future – and giving a general impression of the composers.

    First, Jake Heggie. I’ve seen more operas by Heggie than any other living composer, because his work is performed pretty often in Houston, Dallas, and Austin. He’s a reliable composer who, above all, has a knack for writing good vocal music that singers want to sing. He’s had 2 world premieres in Texas in the last 18 months, although neither feels quite as good, or as iconic, as Dead Man Walking or Moby-Dick. The disappointment has been partly due to the choices of subject, and to an increased use of pastiche which is maybe not one of his strengths.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    JAKE HEGGIE – IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE

    This is a pretty faithful adaptation of the classic movie, with one major exception. Clarence the Angel is now Clara, so that a soprano can be the co-lead with a tenor. The story is told from her perspective instead of George Bailey’s, which helps the opera to dispense with all of the potential scene changes. Clara leads George Bailey through his life by opening a series of doors – think This Is Your Life, or… Bluebeard’s Castle – from which various characters appear and re-enact events on a minimalistic, cosmic stage.

    The opening chorus of angels is aurally arresting, and there is a non-singing part for God (over loudspeaker) which could lend itself to stunt casting. When Clara takes George Bailey into the alternate universe where he had never been born, the opera underlines this grim version of events by completely ceasing all music. The effect of being plunged suddenly into a music-less play is striking, and there was an echo-y hollowness to how the singers were mic’ed for dialogue that further added to the oppressive weight of atmosphere in these scenes.

    Set in the same era as the original movie, Heggie uses a lot of pastiche of period song styles – a school fight song, big band jazz - but unfortunately his versions are not that musically interesting. The worst is a tropical-tinged Charleston knock-off “The Mekee-Mekee” which I personally found unbearable (and it just kept returning…). But the opera did capture the spirit of Christmas, and I can see it making the rounds of U.S. opera companies in coming years, as staging a Christmas opera seems to be the easiest sell to audiences for a modern opera. After taking their bows, the cast and conductor led the audience in singing Auld Lang Syne, and it was a nice moment which I hope future productions duplicate as a tradition, and tribute to the movie.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    JAKE HEGGIE – GREAT SCOTT

    A comic opera about the relevance of opera in our time, Great Scott is about fictional diva Arden Scott returning to her hometown for the world premiere of a long-lost bel canto opera, which is upstaged by the Super Bowl. (This opera was perfect for its Dallas premiere audience.) We are meant to question why opera is relevant when it struggles to connect to new audiences. Then, Arden reconnects with an old flame, Sid Taylor, who ends up skipping the Super Bowl for her premiere and discovering that, hey, OPERA’S PRETTY COOL.

    The premiere run of this opera had a great cast, and Heggie gave all of them great moments. The soprano plays an over-eager, wanna-be diva, who winds up singing the National Anthem at the Super Bowl and adding a hilarious amount of coloratura to it. A countertenor plays a gay stage manager; my eyes rolled a bit about the obviousness of equating countertenor with effeminate, but the character is well-written so it’s not too egregious (however, subsequent performances may not be so well-drawn, and it would be a shame to see it devolve into a stereotype).

    In one of the weaker numbers, two characters get into a competition about who knows more about opera by naming a famous opera character for every letter of the alphabet. It’s a turn-off to potential audiences who know nothing about opera (I know, because I took my brother along to see this), and frankly it wasn’t all that entertaining to me, either.

    Other scenes are also potentially only amusing if you know the operatic clichés they are sending up. But this isn’t Strauss writing Capriccio at the end of his career, genuinely able to outdo his predecessors. Heggie’s send-ups go straight for the cheap gag, and his pastiches are not particularly interesting. The opera-within-an-opera (the bel canto heroine has a mad scene and is then chucked into a volcano) does not further the main plot in any way while it is going on. How much better might it have been if Sid Taylor showed up in a box in the audience and sang his internal reactions to the audience antiphonally?

    It is an entertaining show, but too long, and not an opera that I think will “age” well, unless Heggie edits it a bit.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Despite misgivings about these two shows, I look forward to Heggie’s next opera If I Were You. Based on a 1947 French novel by Julien Green, it is about a man who the devil grants the supernatural power to inhabit another person’s body by singing a secret phrase. The composer states that this will lead to an unusual ensemble cast where many singers each get to become the “lead” character for a time. I think this story plays better to Heggie’s strengths of strong vocal writing and catchy musical motifs.
    I have a ticket to see Dead Man Walking next week. I didn't like Moby Dick when it played here several years ago (except it had a terrific production..), however, have hopes that I will enjoy it as I have begun to see the merit of contemporary pieces since then.

  18. Likes MAuer, Ann Lander (sospiro), Nemorino liked this post

Similar Threads

  1. Modern and Contemporary Opera on DVD, blu-ray, and CD
    By Schigolch in forum DVD, Blu-ray disc, and CD reviews
    Replies: 141
    Last Post: August 14th, 2016, 03:41 PM
  2. Contemporary Music
    By Schigolch in forum Non-Operatic, Non-Vocal Classical Music
    Replies: 198
    Last Post: July 2nd, 2013, 02:32 AM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: July 10th, 2012, 09:21 PM
  4. Contemporary singers? Then, why not contemporary operas?
    By Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) in forum General Operatic Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: February 20th, 2012, 04:25 AM
  5. Contemporary Criticism
    By AnaMendoza in forum General Operatic Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: December 9th, 2011, 10:02 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


free html visitor counters
hit counter




Official Media Partners of Opera Carolina

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Opera Carolina

Official Media Partners of NC Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of North Carolina Opera

Official Media Partners of Greensboro Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Greensboro Opera

Official Media Partners of The A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute and Piedmont Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of The A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute
of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts and Piedmont Opera

Official Media Partners of Asheville Lyric Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Asheville Lyric Opera

Official Media Partners of UNC Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of UNC Opera
Dept. of Music, UNC-Chapel Hill College of Arts and Sciences

www.operalively.com

VISIT WWW.OPERALIVELY.COM FOR ALL YOUR OPERA NEEDS