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Thread: Greetings from another opera addict

          
   
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  1. #16
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    Thanks for the welcome, JohnGerald. If I'm ever tempted to try to quit, I'll ask you why.

  2. #17
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    Hi Natalie! Tristan took me a little while too. Act 1 sounded like all screaming. For me, the secret was reading the Act 1 libretto while listening to the opera. Compared to Act 1, imho, the words aren't especially important in Act 2 until Marke arrives, and they're not as important in Act 3, perhaps, until maybe Marke's arrival or just the Verklärung, so long as one knows generally what Tristan's raving about.

    That Glyndebourne Meistersinger used to be on YouTube but I only watched Act 1 before it disappeared. It looked like a terrific production, and Finley sounded wonderful as Hans Sachs.

    Susan

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  4. #18
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    Hello Clayton.

    I love your broccoli. As I recall, Pres. George Bush (the daddy) doesn't like broccoli.

    Hmm, vegetables in opera. Now there's an interesting topic of study. The only one I can think of offhand is Handel's Largo. "Ombra mai fu, di vegetabile cara ed amabile, soave piu." Of course calling a tree a vegetable doesn't make it a vegetable.

    Susan

    - - - Updated - - -

    Hi Ann,

    So you're sospiro and we're all pazzi? I'll buy that.

    Susan

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    Last edited by La Susanna; February 12th, 2016 at 11:19 PM. Reason: Post to someone else wound up here??!

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  6. #19
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by La Susanna View Post
    Have you heard/seen Waltraud Meier's Isolde with Siegfried Jerusalem, Barenboim conducting? There's a video of it on YouTube. She is the most beautiful Isolde you can imagine, she IS Isolde. It's a weird production, but you can just ignore that, and just feast on Meier. The only wrinkle is that the subtitles are in French, but if that's a problem, ignore them or turn them off. I listen to the CD version too, and it's one of my favorite Tristans.
    I have not seen Isolde. My journey into Wagner began with Meistersinger, followed by the Hollander and Lohengrin. I have gone no further but a casual listen to all his other operas. I have not been compelled to get a DVD of any of the other operas yet. Still need to study the synopses more to see which would be next--if any. I do have this DVD which has excerpts of Waltraud from many Wagner operas and from Fidelio:


    Here is the Otrud clip from that DVD and a clip of Leonore from Fidelio:
    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

  7. #20
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    Hello, Buso. I hope you're not really povero.

    If I have a Puccini question I'll know who to turn to.

    I wonder whether the Tosca on YouTube you're talking about is that lovely film with Domingo, Milnes and Kabaivanska? Sherrill Milnes was the Scarpia in my very first live opera, at the Met, and I really want to accept no substitutes. Scarpia should be suave and sexy like Milnes. In fact he should be Milnes.

    Susan

  8. #21
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    She does a terrific, hair-raising Ortrud. And a world-historic Kundry, by the way, in Parsifal, another Wagner opera for your future opera watching pleasure.

    Susan

  9. #22
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    Indeed, Festat. Magic sword, horn, ring and all. And a swan.

    There are swans in Lohengrin and Parsifal. "Any more in Wagner?", I wonder idly.

    Susan

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  11. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by La Susanna View Post
    Thanks for the welcome, JohnGerald. If I'm ever tempted to try to quit, I'll ask you why.
    In one word: DON'T!

    And while many folks are advocating Wagner, please let the "voice of one crying in the wilderness" suggest that you dip one lovely toe into Bel Canto.

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  13. #24
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by La Susanna View Post
    Hi Florestan. My "collecting" of multiple performances of the operas I like consists of adding them to my Spotify list, but after doing that I do have some kind of feel of possessing them.

    Have you heard/seen Waltraud Meier's Isolde with Siegfried Jerusalem, Barenboim conducting? There's a video of it on YouTube. She is the most beautiful Isolde you can imagine, she IS Isolde. It's a weird production, but you can just ignore that, and just feast on Meier. The only wrinkle is that the subtitles are in French, but if that's a problem, ignore them or turn them off. I listen to the CD version too, and it's one of my favorite Tristans.
    Watraud Meier was, with good reason, voted by the Opera Lively community as the #1, best singer in activity, and that Tristan und Isolde is a good part of the reason. I'm very excited that I'll listen to her live, for the first time in my life, in May in Elektra. Our good friend Hoffmann has had the privilege of attending her live operas in Germany a few times.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  14. #25
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Speaking of German, I like to study languages through opera, by reading the libretto in the original language as the opera plays. The goal is to be able to understand the opera as it is sung, so I value good diction highly in singers. I started this Wagner adventure with some mostly-forgotten introductory German, and now I can read most of the Wagner libretti, especially on my Kindle so I can look up the words I don't know. If I can still learn languages, it probably means I don't have Alzheimers. Of course that's some mighty weird German. If you put me down in modern Berlin I can tell people that my father promised me a sword, but I couldn't ask where the toilets are. French is my best language, but I also have a combination of travelling Italian and 19th century opera libretto Italian.
    Nice. I took some German in high school but it wasn't enough. I have only a few traces of it left. I do speak French (very fluently) and Italian (not so well in terms of correctly speaking it - I make myself understood but often make mistakes, but I do read it very well) and these two do help me with opera. The other two languages I speak, unfortunately very very rarely make any impact on my operatic pursuits (Portuguese, I speak it very fluently but I only know one or two modern operas in Portuguese) and Spanish (I'm fairly OK with it although probably it's not the most grammatically correct one) gives me just a few operas (Florencia en el Amazonas, Ainadamar, the zarzuela Luisa Fernanda, Marķa de Buenos Aires, El Retablo de Maese Pedro, La Vida Breve...). I'd love to know Russian...
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  15. #26
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    By the way, the only signature line I can think of would be too rude to use, although it's tempting. It's from Le Nozze, Susanna to Figaro: "Perche io son la Susanna e tu sei pazzo."
    Hey, I highly encourage you to adopt it. It's not rude; we'll understand it in context. After all, we *are* all crazy, here!
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  16. #27
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by La Susanna View Post
    Hello, Buso. I hope you're not really povero.

    If I have a Puccini question I'll know who to turn to.

    I wonder whether the Tosca on YouTube you're talking about is that lovely film with Domingo, Milnes and Kabaivanska? Sherrill Milnes was the Scarpia in my very first live opera, at the Met, and I really want to accept no substitutes. Scarpia should be suave and sexy like Milnes. In fact he should be Milnes.

    Susan
    There is a very good case to be made, to consider Sherril Milnes to be *the* Scarpia.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  17. #28
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    There is a very good case to be made, to consider Sherril Milnes to be *the* Scarpia.
    Except unfortunately for Mr Milnes, Ruggero Raimondi is THE SCARPIA.
    Natalie

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  19. #29
    Senior Member Veteran Member Povero Buoso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by La Susanna View Post
    Hello, Buso. I hope you're not really povero.

    If I have a Puccini question I'll know who to turn to.

    I wonder whether the Tosca on YouTube you're talking about is that lovely film with Domingo, Milnes and Kabaivanska? Sherrill Milnes was the Scarpia in my very first live opera, at the Met, and I really want to accept no substitutes. Scarpia should be suave and sexy like Milnes. In fact he should be Milnes.

    Susan
    That version is my favourite film version. Milne's Scarpia is exactly who you want to imagine in your head as the character! However, the best audio of the opera is also on YouTube which is the classic De Sabata recording with Gobbi, Di Stefano and Callas!
    "Non sono in vena" Rodolfo summing up P.B's feelings on his dissertation.

  20. #30
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Welcome, La Susanna! Sorry I'm just seeing your thread now. I'm glad to hear about your opera addiction, and encourage you to listen to nothing but Wagner. Non-stop, twenty-four hours a day. Forever.

    Especially Parsifal, Luiz's favorite opera.

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