Thread: What opera have you purchased recently?

          
   
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  1. #1816
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    Wagner, Schmagner. They had Beethoven!!!

    (And my "native German" isn't all that great. My mother never really taught us the language, and I didn't formally learn it until I was in college. I doubt my command of the language is any better than Hoffmann's.)
    You must be kidding. I can only read your monthly translations absolutely green with envy.

  2. #1817
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoffmann View Post
    You must be kidding. I can only read your monthly translations absolutely green with envy.
    Same with me, until I went back and checked the originals. Imagine my surprise! Nothing remotely like these supposed "translations"--she just makes it all up!

    Would I lie?

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  4. #1818
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    (And my "native German" isn't all that great. My mother never really taught us the language, and I didn't formally learn it until I was in college. I doubt my command of the language is any better than Hoffmann's.)
    Sounds like me and Italian. Dad also never really taught us Italian since my mom didn't speak it and he didn't want that split in the household where she'd be out of the loop (I mean, of course she could have learned too, but maybe he thought that being an adult she'd struggle more with it than we kids would and didn't want to embarrass her - he loved her dearly). I still absorbed a lot of it from dad talking to his brothers and his sister (who came often to spend weekend luncheons with us, practically every weekend, or we'd go to their places), and from his listening to Italian music and having all sorts of vinyls of it, including opera, plus some visits to Italy.

    Now, I do understand almost 100% of everyday Italian, with the very rare, odd word here and there that I don't know (then I look it up and learn it) and I have no trouble reading it and translating it into English, but speaking is another matter since I never formally learned it. I do get by but it's a lot of hesitation and word searching. When I go to Italy, again, I have little or almost no communication trouble since I do understand what they are saying 100% and manage to reply with a mix of Romance languages that they end up understanding as well. My son who speaks fluent and correct Italian laughs at me and says "Dad, what you are speaking is not really Italian..." and I reply "well, they do understand me."

    I keep postponing the project of learning it correctly once and for all. There's never time to do it.

    I did manage to interview maestro Daniele Gatti in Italian, over the phone... that wasn't the easiest thing in the world, but worked. I also chatted with maestro Marco Armiliato in Italian, although the interview itself was done in English. In shorter stretches when a singer switches to Italian temporarily during an interview, it's no problem, I can keep up. Sustaining a long conversation in Italian is more difficult.

    When I go to the Met, they do offer Met Titles in Italian whenever the opera is in Italian (when it isn't, it's only English, German, and Spanish - not even French which I can't comprehend) and that's how I set the Met Titles each time, because it's much more fun to follow the Italian text. But I must say, Italian libretti are way more difficult than everyday modern Italian. My comprehension of 100% of the spoken language in today's Italy does not apply to libretti, which have hundreds of ancient words that I don't know, and it all goes too fast to retain and remember and look them up later.

    But this, I think would be true even if I mastered the language entirely, and had studied it formally. I'd guess that most native speakers would struggle with the ancient Italian present in most opera libretti, too. I mean, there are long stretches with just regular language that is very understandable (especially during recitatives), but sometimes, oh boy, it's all very difficult, and of course the older the opera is, the worse.

    I'd be curious to know if Wagner's libretti present the same challenges to German speakers. MAuer and Hoffmann, what do you say to this?
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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  6. #1819
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amfortas View Post
    Same with me, until I went back and checked the originals. Imagine my surprise! Nothing remotely like these supposed "translations"--she just makes it all up!

    Would I lie?
    You? Noooo!

    But I'd defend our good MAuer. I've checked too, and her lies are often focused on Jonas Kaufmann reviews, so other than that, she's OK. When these magazine reviewers put down Kaufmann's performances and call him one of the worst tenors in the world, MAuer changes it all to the opposite. That's why over here we seem to think that this guy is good, because we only have access to her translation. I mean, there's also the Fidelio thingy. When reviewers bash the opera itself she also refuses to translate it accurately.

    But when they say that Anna Netrebko is wonderful which they always do, MAuer does report it accurately.

    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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  8. #1820
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    Saints be praised! The mail carrier just dropped of the new La Favorite (Aldrich, Shi, Tezier) which will go into the player this evening.

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  10. #1821
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Um

    both the Gardelli and Levine La forza

    I need to listen to them both on CD as opposed to SpotyTie with all the interruptions of an unstable interweb connection

  11. #1822
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Tchaikovsky: Eugene Onegin
    Galina Vishnevskaya (Tatyana), Ywevgeniy Belos (Onegin), Sergey Lemeshev (Lensky), Larissa Avdeyeva (Olga), Valentina Petrova (Larina), Eugenia Verbitskaya (Filipyevna), Ivan Petrov (Gremin), Andrei Sokolov (Triquet), Igor Mikhailov (Zaretsky)
    Choir and Orchestra of the Bolshoi Theatre, Boris Khaikin

    Name:  Eugene Onegin - Boris Khaikin, Bolshoi Theatre.jpg
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    Oh yes!

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  13. #1823
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Handel: Imeneo
    Ann Hallenberg (Tirinto), Kay Stiefermann (Imeneo), Johanna Stojkovic (Rosmene), Siri Karoline Thornhill (Clomiri), Locky Chung (Argenio)
    VokalEnsemble Köln & Capella Augustina, Andreas Spering

    Name:  Imeneo - Andreas Spering.jpg
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    I don't know the opera, I've never heard a Spering Handel... a wild stab in the dark...

    but it is Handel, it is Spering and it is Hallenberg.

  14. #1824
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    Tchaikovsky: Eugene Onegin
    Galina Vishnevskaya (Tatyana), Ywevgeniy Belos (Onegin), Sergey Lemeshev (Lensky), Larissa Avdeyeva (Olga), Valentina Petrova (Larina), Eugenia Verbitskaya (Filipyevna), Ivan Petrov (Gremin), Andrei Sokolov (Triquet), Igor Mikhailov (Zaretsky)
    Choir and Orchestra of the Bolshoi Theatre, Boris Khaikin

    Name:  Eugene Onegin - Boris Khaikin, Bolshoi Theatre.jpg
Views: 91
Size:  64.1 KB

    Oh yes!
    Sergey Lemeshev

    Natalie

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  16. #1825
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    I made my annual trek to Dussmann here in Berlin the other day, only to discover the fever spreading. They had moved the classical/opera music to smaller space, with significantly reduced inventory. Still plenty to browse, but opera inventory now maybe half the size of last year.

    Alas.

    Re: Luiz' question, above, I find Wagner's libretto supertitles very helpful, here in Berlin, despite my limited German, in guiding me thru the action. Nowhere near as good as English, of course, but in murky/weird Regie productions (such as the Tannhauser with naked ladies we saw the other night; don't even get me started on the Parsifal...) they help provide some context to what is supposed to be happening on stage at a given moment, given the absence of traditional markers. The posted surtitles, btw, are the actual libretto, and not some Dramaturg concoction.

    Re:

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  18. #1826
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoffmann View Post
    I made my annual trek to Dussmann here in Berlin the other day, only to discover the fever spreading. They had moved the classical/opera music to smaller space, with significantly reduced inventory. Still plenty to browse, but opera inventory now maybe half the size of last year.

    Alas.

    Re: Luiz' question, above, I find Wagner's libretto supertitles very helpful, here in Berlin, despite my limited German, in guiding me thru the action. Nowhere near as good as English, of course, but in murky/weird Regie productions (such as the Tannhauser with naked ladies we saw the other night; don't even get me started on the Parsifal...) they help provide some context to what is supposed to be happening on stage at a given moment, given the absence of traditional markers. The posted surtitles, btw, are the actual libretto, and not some Dramaturg concoction.

    Re:
    Well, if there are naked ladies, I wouldn't be paying attention to the supertitles anyway.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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  20. #1827
    Senior Member Veteran Member
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    Les Vepres Sicilienne arrived today and Guillaume Tell from the ROF has been dispatched from Presto Classical and is on the way. Life is good!

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  22. #1828
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnGerald View Post
    Guillaume Tell Life is good!
    Yes, life is good with great operas on DVD. Somehow I see Guillaume Tell on my DVD shelf someday.
    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

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  24. #1829
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Just won on ebay:
    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

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  26. #1830
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Just now, online:


    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

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