Thread: What opera have you purchased recently?

          
   
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  1. #1411
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    I had to, sooner or later.




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  3. #1412
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Dark_Angel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amfortas View Post
    I had to, sooner or later.


    There will be blood version (directors cut) ..............

  4. #1413
    Senior Member Involved Member Revenant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    I've got that on order too and I am so excited! I think Tamerlano might be my second favourite Handel opera.
    It's getting up there on my short list as well. Studying how Handel and his librettist adapted the original libretto for greater coherence and dramatic potential has allowed me to appreciate the achievement even more.
    Never try to teach a pig to sing. You will waste your time and you will annoy the pig.

  5. #1414
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revenant View Post
    It's getting up there on my short list as well. Studying how Handel and his librettist adapted the original libretto for greater coherence and dramatic potential has allowed me to appreciate the achievement even more.
    OOh, tell us more.
    Natalie

  6. #1415
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Campra: Le Carnaval de Venise
    Opéra-ballet. Paris, 1699
    Salomé Haller (Isabelle), Marina de Liso (Léonore), Andrew Foster-Williams (Rodolphe), Edwin Crossley-Mercer (Léandre), Anders J. Dahlin (Orphée), Sarah Tynan (Euridice), Isabelle Druet (Minerve/La Fortune), Luigi de Donato (Le Carnaval/Pluton)
    Le Concert Spirituel,
    Hervé Niquet

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    Campra
    Glossa
    FT - "...The music is irresistible in a performance as charismatic as this..."
    BBC - "...it's a fascinating issue..."
    Gramophone - "...there are no weak links..."



    what could possibly go wrong?


    - - - Updated - - -

    Oh yes and 20% off promotion plus free delivery at Presto Classical.

  7. #1416
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Rameau: Les Surprises de l'Amour
    Virginie Pochon, Caroline Mutel, Amel Brahim-Djeloul (sopranos), Karine Deshayes (mezzo-soprano), Anders Dahlin (tenor), Pierre-Yves Pruvot, Jean-Sébastien Bou (baritones)
    Les Nouveaux Caractères,
    Sébastien d’Hérin

    Name:  Les Surprises de l’amour – Sébastien d’Hérin, Les Noveaux Caractères.jpg
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    Rameau
    Glossa
    Bou

    and okay, I had to clear an order of GBP25 to get the free delivery.

    It's gotta be a good bet though...


  8. #1417
    Senior Member Involved Member Revenant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    OOh, tell us more.
    I don't know if you have listened to any other adaptation of the same original libretto. For example, Vivaldi's Bajazet, which I enjoyed recently. Aside from the music, which is great in both - more melodious in Vivaldi and more dramatic and character-specific in Handel, V's Bajazet moves through a series of arias with little regard for dramatic development or impact. Bajazet is handeled by Handel with tragic grandeur. His interactions with his daughter and his on-stage death scene (omitted in V's) are unparalled in Baroque opera since Monteverdi, afaik. I believe that the seeds of Rigoletto and Fidelio and other future operas are there in Tamerlano. My only problem is that I haven't yet heard the role of Tamerlano (H) itself satisfactorily sung or acted. Maybe this new version will be a revelation in this regard, I hope.
    Never try to teach a pig to sing. You will waste your time and you will annoy the pig.

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  10. #1418
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revenant View Post
    I don't know if you have listened to any other adaptation of the same original libretto. For example, Vivaldi's Bajazet, which I enjoyed recently. Aside from the music, which is great in both - more melodious in Vivaldi and more dramatic and character-specific in Handel, V's Bajazet moves through a series of arias with little regard for dramatic development or impact. Bajazet is handeled by Handel with tragic grandeur. His interactions with his daughter and his on-stage death scene (omitted in V's) are unparalled in Baroque opera since Monteverdi, afaik. I believe that the seeds of Rigoletto and Fidelio and other future operas are there in Tamerlano. My only problem is that I haven't yet heard the role of Tamerlano (H) itself satisfactorily sung or acted. Maybe this new version will be a revelation in this regard, I hope.
    There is an aria in the Handel version, where Bajazet talks of waiting for his daughter by the river of Lethe, which is possibly for me the most moving aria in the whole of opera. It certainly is a dramatically strong opera.
    Natalie

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  12. #1419
    Senior Member Involved Member Revenant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    There is an aria in the Handel version, where Bajazet talks of waiting for his daughter by the river of Lethe, which is possibly for me the most moving aria in the whole of opera. It certainly is a dramatically strong opera.
    That one! Yes. Poetry in the depths of despair; standing at the edge of the abyss but looking back at his loved one.
    Never try to teach a pig to sing. You will waste your time and you will annoy the pig.

  13. #1420
    Senior Member Involved Member Revenant's Avatar
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    Finally found a copy of this in Amazon, after a long out of stock period. A marketplace associate, as they call them, had one copy left. Supposed to be new in box. I hope so. (Everyone has one of those shrink wrapper thingies nowadays.)

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    Never try to teach a pig to sing. You will waste your time and you will annoy the pig.

  14. #1421
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Name:  Didone abbandonata - Michael Hofstetter 2011, Theresa Holzhauser, Flavio Ferri-Benedetti, Valer .jpg
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Size:  33.5 KB Name:  Le Magnifique - Ryan Brown 2011, Emiliano Gonzalez Toro, Elizabeth Calleo, Marguerite Krull, Jef.jpg
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    Name:  La sposa di Messina - Antonino Fogliani 2009, Jessica Pratt, Filippo Adami, Armando Ariostini, W.jpg
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    Err...

    Naxos promotion.

    I haven't made a duff purchase (I wish I hadn't bought that) yet; I hope it still holds...

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  16. #1422
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    ...
    I haven't made a duff purchase (I wish I hadn't bought that) yet...
    Oh wait, yes I have.

    Myto Records, I Vespri Siciliani Erich Kleiber 1951. Not recommended; so much noise that you would need x-ray vision AND magic spectacles to see what's going on.

  17. #1423
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    One other thing I forgot to mention; I also ordered La Forza as recommended by Nervous Gentleman in the Favourite recordings thread. I 've been going round and round in circles for weeks trying to decide on a La Forza recording.


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  19. #1424
    Senior Member Involved Member Revenant's Avatar
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    I saw this production at the now sadly defunct New York City Opera in 1973. So I just ordered this recording for old times' sake. It has the same conductor (Rudel) and at least two of the three principals (iirc, the stage version that I saw had Sills not Caballe), but it appears to have been recorded in Britain.

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    Never try to teach a pig to sing. You will waste your time and you will annoy the pig.

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  21. #1425
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revenant View Post
    I saw this production at the now sadly defunct New York City Opera in 1973. So I just ordered this recording for old times' sake. It has the same conductor (Rudel) and at least two of the three principals (iirc, the stage version that I saw had Sills not Caballe), but it appears to have been recorded in Britain.

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    That was one of the first operas I ever saw, when NYCO used to tour to the Kennedy Center each spring. By the time I saw this production (Tito Capobianco, if I remember correctly), in the late 70s, Samuel Ramey was singing Mefistofele. I used to rave about him, and a fellow in my office, who was much older, would say "You should have seen Norman Treigle". I also saw the NYCO productions of Barber of Seville with Beverly Sills, Turandot, and the only time I've seen La Fanciulla del West.

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