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  1. #61
    Schigolch
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    On screwball comedies, my favourite is Bringing Up Baby.

    I do agree about Shock, it goes down the hill very quickly after the girl is taken to the madhouse.

  2. #62
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Festat's Avatar
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    About Shock, I think the highlight is the storm scene. The presentation of Martin, the violent patient, is the best shot of the film.
    Its very effective both formally and dramatically.


    I'm researching the not-so-canonical film noir for an essay on art direction. Went through, just now:

    The suspect, 1944, by Robert Siodmak. With the always brilliant Charles Laughton and the beautiful Ella Raines.
    A real gem.


    Flamingo road, 1949, by Michael Curtiz. My beloved Joan Crawford in the main role.
    I love when she gets to sing in her movies. This is no Mildred Pierce, though.
    Last edited by Festat; July 25th, 2012 at 09:17 AM.

  3. #63
    Schigolch
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    I like a lot The Suspect (not so much Flamingo Road).

    Interesting subject for an essay.

  4. #64
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Festat's Avatar
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    It appears that the movies that are most resourceful for my subject are usually the not-so-good ones: hard-boiled Joan Crawford flicks like Flamingo road, The damned don't cry! (I love this title) and Possessed and B-Siodmaks like The spiral staircase and The dark mirror.

    Curiously they are all centered in the women, who are not exactly the cold evil sexy standard like major film noir examples such as The big heat, The killers (Kitty Collins is definitely my favorite one) and Double indemnity.

  5. #65
    Schigolch
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    Well, while I don't really care for those Crawford's vehicles, I do think Siodmak's films during the 1940s were just great, it was difficult for him to get it wrong during that period.

  6. #66
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Festat's Avatar
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    I have some trouble sitting through Christmas holiday, but that's probably because I can't stand Gene Kelly. :P

    Just rewatched the most matter-of-fact of Robert Wise's movies, I want to live! — there is a certain thing with titles ending in exclamation points that always gets me. Brutal final scene which makes the absurdity of death penalty pop right in front of our eyes. And terrific performance by the often underestimated Susan Hayward.

  7. #67
    Schigolch
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    Not really my cup of tea... It's been such a long time since I watched this movie... And then, I've just asked myself, would you like to watch it again?. And the answer was a clear and firm, "No.".

  8. #68
    Schigolch
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    A classic of 'art' cinema, Jean Vigo's Zero de Conduite, complete in youtube:


  9. #69
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Festat's Avatar
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    After days in the darkness with My name is Julia Ross, Decoy, The woman in the window, High Sierra and Johnny Eagle, I decided to give me a break of film noir with my favorite from Griffith: Way down East, 1920.

    Complete on youtube:


    In my first time some years ago I had to watch it again immediately after it was over. I was just too impressed.

  10. #70
    Junior Member Recent member Mascagnian's Avatar
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    I was just browsing through this discussion thread and had to stop and concur with your favorable opinion of Ms. Crawford, and the particular films you cite (btw Female On the Beach is another great title). The longevity of Crawford's film career (approximately 45 years: 1925 - 1970) meant that she spanned a variety of eras and interesting career phases. The Crawford eras I most prefer are the early/mid 30s and the late 40s/early 50s.
    Just yesterday evening TCM in the US was spotlighting "Crawford in the 1960s." Of course they showed Baby Jane and Strait-Jacket (both of which I have on DVD) but they also showed "I Saw What You Did" and "The Caretakers," both of which are seldom shown.
    Regards,
    Macgagnian

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  12. #71
    Schigolch
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    I also love that Griffith's movie, though my absolute favorite is Broken Blossoms, also complete in youtube:


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  14. #72
    Schigolch
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    Such a great movie... The Night of the Hunter, complete in youtube:


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  16. #73
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Festat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mascagnian View Post
    I was just browsing through this discussion thread and had to stop and concur with your favorable opinion of Ms. Crawford, and the particular films you cite (btw Female On the Beach is another great title). The longevity of Crawford's film career (approximately 45 years: 1925 - 1970) meant that she spanned a variety of eras and interesting career phases. The Crawford eras I most prefer are the early/mid 30s and the late 40s/early 50s.
    Just yesterday evening TCM in the US was spotlighting "Crawford in the 1960s." Of course they showed Baby Jane and Strait-Jacket (both of which I have on DVD) but they also showed "I Saw What You Did" and "The Caretakers," both of which are seldom shown.
    Joan was a wonderful figure. A true star, and how she loved it!
    And undoubtedly one of the most beautiful faces to grace the screen.

  17. #74
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Festat's Avatar
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    A gem from the experimentation period at Biograph, Those awful hats, 1909, by D. W. Griffith.

  18. #75
    Schigolch
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    For the first time in 50 years, the number one in the yearly survey of "Sight and Sounds" on the greatest films ever, is not Citizen Kane:

    http://www.bfi.org.uk/news/50-greatest-films-all-time

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