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  1. #1606
    Senior Member Veteran Member Povero Buoso's Avatar
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    As I'm sure everyone has seen famous Opera lover and United States Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia has died. Whatever your opinions on the man it is clear he deeply loved opera as we all do (he loved Gianni Schicchi apparently!) and it is sad that we have lost a member of the broader opera loving community.
    "Non sono in vena" Rodolfo summing up P.B's feelings on his dissertation.

  2. #1607
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    It's sad that his passing immediately, inevitably, becomes occasion for even more political division and turmoil. At least we here can take a moment to acknowledge a fellow opera lover.

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  4. #1608
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Operatic 2016 Grammy Winners

    Joyce DiDonato and Tony Pappano won the Grammy for Solo Classical Vocal Performance for their album Joyce and Tony Live at Wigmore Hall.



    Best Opera Recording went to Seiji Ozawa and the Saito Kinen Orchestra; Ravel: L'Enfant Et Les Sortilèges; Shéhérazade



    In addition to Joyce, the above recording features two other Opera Lively interviewees, Isabel Leonard and Susan Graham. Congratulations to our three interviewees!

    Best Orchestral Performance went to the Boston Symphony Orchestra, “Shostakovich: Under Stalin’s Shadow - Symphony No. 10” - this album does feature the "Passacaglia" from Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District.


    Last edited by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva); February 16th, 2016 at 01:05 AM.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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  6. #1609
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    29 year old Lithuanian Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla appointed musical director City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

    https://cbso.co.uk/who-we-are/our-co...grazinyte-tyla

    After reading Povero Buoso's post, I realized - Oh, that Birmingham! We have a couple Birminghams here, too (right, JohnGerald and Florestan?). I immediately (and snarkily) thought of this one:

    Name:  alabama-map.jpg
Views: 65
Size:  49.3 KB

    But then I thought I better check and, sure enough! Birminingham, AL has an opera company! Who knew?

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  8. #1610
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoffmann View Post
    After reading Povero Buoso's post, I realized - Oh, that Birmingham! We have a couple Birminghams here, too (right, JohnGerald and Florestan?).
    Your Birminghams are named after the one and only Brum. You can usually tell which Birmingham someone comes from by the way they talk.




    Quote Originally Posted by Hoffmann View Post
    I immediately (and snarkily) thought of this one:

    Name:  alabama-map.jpg
Views: 65
Size:  49.3 KB

    But then I thought I better check and, sure enough! Birmingham, AL has an opera company! Who knew?
    Ha!
    "The world calls them its singers and poets and artists and storytellers; but they are just people who have never forgotten the way to fairyland."
    Lucy Maud Montgomery

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  10. #1611
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoffmann View Post
    After reading Povero Buoso's post, I realized - Oh, that Birmingham! We have a couple Birminghams here, too (right, JohnGerald and Florestan?). I immediately (and snarkily) thought of this one:

    Name:  alabama-map.jpg
Views: 65
Size:  49.3 KB

    But then I thought I better check and, sure enough! Birminingham, AL has an opera company! Who knew?
    We also have a Birmingham, Michigan, which is a suburb of Detroit.
    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

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  12. #1612
    Senior Member Veteran Member Povero Buoso's Avatar
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    Another article from the economist on the lack of young Italian singers today http://www.economist.com/blogs/prosp...erasingersgone
    "Non sono in vena" Rodolfo summing up P.B's feelings on his dissertation.

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  14. #1613
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Povero Buoso View Post
    Another article from the economist on the lack of young Italian singers today http://www.economist.com/blogs/prosp...erasingersgone
    Very nice and informative article with many bits that I didn't know about, such as the sad fact that only two Italian opera houses posted a surplus, and the Rome Young Artists Program being created now is only the second one in Italy after La Scala's; what a shame!

    Well, there is one exaggeration, of course: "Despite his glorious voice, Pavarotti may not have made the cut today." That is hard to believe. Sure, the current environment asks for people who can act and look good, except when they have a tenor instrument that was arguably the best one the art form has ever produced; certainly top five. I can't imagine that in spite of today's HD broadcast demands, a voice like Pavarotti's wouldn't succeed.

    Another impression I have from a distance (I need to visit Italy again; it's been a long time) is that in spite of the fact that singers I interview also say that the Italian singers are not adventurous and are often ill-prepared in terms of coming to rehearsals (something a recent interviewee said, but then asked me to cut from the published interview, not willing to offend the Italian colleagues - I've heard it from others as well but this kind of criticism rarely makes the final text and is often made in-off), there is still plenty of quality singing in Italy. When we get those rather low technical quality DVDs from regional Italian opera houses with no-name singers, often the singing is surprisingly good (although indeed the acting is often missing).

    Maybe the singing is in the blood; Italy *is* the cradle of opera, after all; and something is to be said in favor of articulation/diction when artists can sing in their native language, but yes, more must be done to re-ignite the energy in Italian opera houses and make sure the young singers are trained to international standards including acting lessons.

    One point that the article did not make (of course, it is a bit off-topic) is that fortunately Italy continues to export quality conductors, at least. I was thinking of that while reading this, and when I clicked on one of the links I was pleased to read another The Economist piece precisely making this point: [clicky].
    Last edited by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva); February 20th, 2016 at 04:19 PM.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  15. #1614
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    I would love to read this article [clicky] but pesky Newsweek says I have reached the limit of 5 free articles per month and I'm not about to subscribe. I saved the link to try again in March, but if anybody here has read it and can summarize the points made, it's appreciated.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  16. #1615
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Oh wow. The article from The Economist praising the new generation of Italian conductors quoted Riccardo Muti as if implying that he was pleased with the new generation, but his interview, for those who can read Italian, says the opposite in all letters. He laments the fact that are so many Italian conductors popping up and calls his colleagues "imbeciles." He even criticizes how they dress, these days. Kind of funny to read the master being so angry.

    [clicky]
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  17. #1616
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    I would love to read this article [clicky] but pesky Newsweek says I have reached the limit of 5 free articles per month and I'm not about to subscribe. I saved the link to try again in March, but if anybody here has read it and can summarize the points made, it's appreciated.

    Funny. I tried accessing the article and am cited as having reached my 5 free articles also. I don't read Newsweek online! What's up with that? Unless, of course, by using your link they think I am on your computer...


    Yes, that seems to be the problem - accessing "Newsweek" separately, on my computer, then searching for the article "The End of Italian Opera..." (the article is from December, 2013!), I found it:

    Try this link: http://www.newsweek.com/end-italian-...dy-sing-225175
    Last edited by Hoffmann; February 20th, 2016 at 04:47 PM.

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  19. #1617
    Senior Member Veteran Member Povero Buoso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    Oh wow. The article from The Economist praising the new generation of Italian conductors quoted Riccardo Muti as if implying that he was pleased with the new generation, but his interview, for those who can read Italian, says the opposite in all letters. He laments the fact that are so many Italian conductors popping up and calls his colleagues "imbeciles." He even criticizes how they dress, these days. Kind of funny to read the master being so angry.

    [clicky]
    To be honest mushrooms in rain seems pretty derogatory (which was the only bit in the economist article directly quoting Muti I think)

    I agree on the Pavarotti point though but then again I'm someone who thinks that Pavarotti wasn't terrible at acting especially from the 1994 Met Pagliacci which is probably going to get my vote when we reach it in the top 100 thread.
    "Non sono in vena" Rodolfo summing up P.B's feelings on his dissertation.

  20. #1618
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Povero Buoso View Post
    To be honest mushrooms in rain seems pretty derogatory (which was the only bit in the economist article directly quoting Muti I think)
    The original article is even more derogatory - basically saying that conductors in Italy today choose the profession because they can't sing or play an instrument, and they are popping up like mushrooms.He blames it on the speeding up of society.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Povero Buoso View Post
    I agree on the Pavarotti point though but then again I'm someone who thinks that Pavarotti wasn't terrible at acting especially from the 1994 Met Pagliacci which is probably going to get my vote when we reach it in the top 100 thread.
    Johan Botha gets work even though he has less connection with the audience (IMO) than Pav.
    Natalie

  21. #1619
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoffmann View Post
    Funny. I tried accessing the article and am cited as having reached my 5 free articles also. I don't read Newsweek online! What's up with that? Unless, of course, by using your link they think I am on your computer...


    Yes, that seems to be the problem - accessing "Newsweek" separately, on my computer, then searching for the article "The End of Italian Opera..." (the article is from December, 2013!), I found it:

    Try this link: http://www.newsweek.com/end-italian-...dy-sing-225175
    OK, now it worked, thanks. I read it. It confirmed what I knew already that La Scala, La Fenice, and Teatro Regio di Torino are the ones that do well. A small one that is turning the corner is the Bari one.

    I think ultimately the least viable houses will close down but some will survive by becoming more modern in their management style and funding sources.
    Last edited by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva); February 20th, 2016 at 08:45 PM.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  22. #1620
    Senior Member Veteran Member Povero Buoso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    The original article is even more derogatory - basically saying that conductors in Italy today choose the profession because they can't sing or play an instrument, and they are popping up like mushrooms.He blames it on the speeding up of society.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Johan Botha gets work even though he has less connection with the audience (IMO) than Pav.
    D'oh I meant Luiz's point not the Economist. To be honest my first thought when they pointed Pavarotti out in the article was Marcello Alvarez gets lots of work even though he is also not a conventional looker and not nearly as good a singer as Pavarotti ( Marcello's acting might be a tad better)
    "Non sono in vena" Rodolfo summing up P.B's feelings on his dissertation.

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