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  1. #1846
    Senior Member Involved Member jflatter's Avatar
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    https://www.eno.org/news/english-nat...r-partnership/

    This is significant news for London opera goers. It seems that the ENO have given staging opera at the Coliseum in summer time for the long term. However getting an orchestra as good as the ENO's is boost for the new Grange Park Opera festival which has moved to a new location. Hopefully it gives the orchestra members some stability as well.

  2. #1847
    Senior Member Involved Member jflatter's Avatar
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    Sad to hear the premature passing of tenor Endrik Wottrich.

    http://www.rhinegold.co.uk/opera_now...26-april-2017/

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  4. #1848
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    How sad -- yet another singer (like Johan Botha, Daniela Dessi, and Gerd Grochowski) lost far too early.

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  6. #1849
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    An interesting thought piece in Sunday's "Washington Post", by the theater critic Peter Marks, in which he discusses his concerns about the classical theater - specifically Shakespeare - that also is a common concern among opera fans. He gives examples of a number of famous Shakespeare companies, like Washington's Shakespeare Theater Company and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, among others, that boost their revenue by adding, (gulp) musicals to their schedules. Washington, he says, has three plays by the Bard on the schedule: a "Macbeth" that opens officially on Monday; a "Twelfth Night" and a "Hamlet"... Also on Shakespeare Theater's calendar next season is a revival of that favorite of the Jacobeans, Lerner and Lowe's "Camelot."

    His article continues from that concern to the next big issue - that all of these companies are only staging the 12 or so most popular of Shakespeare's plays. So, he asks, And if these companies fall back endlessly on titles such as "As You Like It" and "A Midsummer Night's Dream", will the ultimate consequence be a further diminishment of Shakespeare, a wearing down by Chronic Warhorse Fatigue Syndrome?

    See what you think:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/enter...=.35172a89671f

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  8. #1850
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    There are some definite parallels to the current state of affairs in opera, right down to the use of updated settings in the hope of making centuries-old works more relevant to modern audiences. It's interesting that musicals -- and not just popular plays -- are seen as the answer to filling company coffers in spoken-word theater as well. Apparently, this isn't some sort of uniquely American phenomenon, either; even in the German-speaking countries, where performing arts organizations are supported by state funding, many of the city and regional theaters that perform operas also include a fair number of musicals in their season schedules.

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  10. #1851
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    There are some definite parallels to the current state of affairs in opera, right down to the use of updated settings in the hope of making centuries-old works more relevant to modern audiences. It's interesting that musicals -- and not just popular plays -- are seen as the answer to filling company coffers in spoken-word theater as well. Apparently, this isn't some sort of uniquely American phenomenon, either; even in the German-speaking countries, where performing arts organizations are supported by state funding, many of the city and regional theaters that perform operas also include a fair number of musicals in their season schedules.
    Very interesting that German theaters are resorting to the same "solutions" as US companies. Right after I posted and was going to bed, it occurred to me that maybe the U.S.'s aversion to state funding was at least part of the reason that opera and theater companies had to resort to such, well, unfortunate alternatives. So, I guess, funding is not the reason. At least in part it's because musicals are popular. Who knew?

    Although, now that I think of it, I went to a German musical at the Komische Oper a couple of years ago, titled "Ball im Savoy" (by Paul Abraham, I think) that had been staged there in the 1920/30s and was stylish, beautifully done and totally charming (even if the performers were miked in a fairly small auditorium). Mr. Abraham became a victim of the Nazi regime and the performers did a very touching tribute to his tenure at the KO immediately following the curtain call.

    So, because of the more relaxed style of the Komische Oper, musicals are not so shocking there - if the Berliner Staatsoper or Deutsche Oper scheduled a musical, I would have to be resuscitated.
    Last edited by Hoffmann; May 1st, 2017 at 01:23 PM.

  11. #1852
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoffmann View Post
    Very interesting that German theaters are resorting to the same "solutions" as US companies. Right after I posted and was going to bed, it occurred to me that maybe the U.S.'s aversion to state funding was at least part of the reason that opera and theater companies had to resort to such, well, unfortunate alternatives. So, I guess, funding is not the reason. At least in part it's because musicals are popular. Who knew?

    Although, now that I think of it, I went to a German musical at the Komische Oper a couple of years ago, titled "Ball im Savoy" (by Paul Abraham, I think) that had been staged there in the 1920/30s and was stylish, beautifully done and totally charming (even if the performers were miked in a fairly small auditorium). Mr. Abraham became a victim of the Nazi regime and the performers did a very touching tribute to his tenure at the KO immediately following the curtain call.

    So, because of the more relaxed style of the Komische Oper, musicals are not so shocking there - if the Berliner Staatsoper or Deutsche Oper scheduled a musical, I would have to be resuscitated.
    You don't go to a steakhouse to order pizza, and you don't go to a pizzeria to order a steak. I firmly believe that musicals should stay with the specialized venues such as Broadway theaters, and opera should stay with the opera houses, including because of a matter of quality. Most of the time, musicals done by opera companies (with exceptions) are not that good, like a pizza wouldn't be that good in a steakhouse. Besides, I don't really see the need for it in terms of filling the seats, given that there are so many sold-out opera performances when it's a good one with a good cast! And also, the art form does have the sub-genre operettas. Something like Orphée aux Enfers, Die Fledermaus, L'Étoile, and La Grande-Duchesse de Gérolstein are all just as good as any musical, so why wouldn't opera companies do operettas instead of musicals, if they wanted more popular and lighter fare? A matter of popularity? Well, many new musicals don't have any popularity when they start. They acquire it once they get exposure, good reviews, ads, word-of-mouth. I don't see why a very good operetta couldn't achieve the same result.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  12. #1853
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    You don't go to a steakhouse to order pizza, and you don't go to a pizzeria to order a steak. I firmly believe that musicals should stay with the specialized venues such as Broadway theaters, and opera should stay with the opera houses, including because of a matter of quality. Most of the time, musicals done by opera companies (with exceptions) are not that good, like a pizza wouldn't be that good in a steakhouse. Besides, I don't really see the need for it in terms of filling the seats, given that there are so many sold-out opera performances when it's a good one with a good cast! And also, the art form does have the sub-genre operettas. Something like Orphée aux Enfers, Die Fledermaus, L'Étoile, and La Grande-Duchesse de Gérolstein are all just as good as any musical, so why wouldn't opera companies do operettas instead of musicals, if they wanted more popular and lighter fare? A matter of popularity? Well, many new musicals don't have any popularity when they start. They acquire it once they get exposure, good reviews, ads, word-of-mouth. I don't see why a very good operetta couldn't achieve the same result.
    In many cities the opera house is the only place were they stage music dramas of any kind. Because of that there is only one place were musicals get performed of any kind and that is the opera house and if they were not staged there the opera house would just be closed that day and the musicals would not be performed at all.

  13. #1854
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Marcelo Álvarez pulls out of Teatro Colón's Andrea Chénier.

    When Angela Gheorghiu cancelled Teatro Colón's Adriana Lecouvreur, she was castigated; when another singer cancels, it's the fault of the opera house.

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  15. #1855
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ingvar View Post
    In many cities the opera house is the only place were they stage music dramas of any kind. Because of that there is only one place were musicals get performed of any kind and that is the opera house and if they were not staged there the opera house would just be closed that day and the musicals would not be performed at all.
    While I agree with Luiz in principle - admittedly, a somewhat purist sense of how the world should operate, I would have to say that you make a good point. I don't like that the Kennedy Center Opera House schedule is crammed with musicals, which are extremely popular here in DC, but am happy that operas still are an important part of the program.

  16. #1856
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ingvar View Post
    In many cities the opera house is the only place were they stage music dramas of any kind. Because of that there is only one place were musicals get performed of any kind and that is the opera house and if they were not staged there the opera house would just be closed that day and the musicals would not be performed at all.
    Good point, but for me that wouldn't be a big loss. I can't stand most musicals anyway.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  17. #1857
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    Good point, but for me that wouldn't be a big loss. I can't stand most musicals anyway.
    With the possible exception of Mary Poppins!
    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

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  19. #1858
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ann Lander (sospiro) View Post
    Marcelo Álvarez pulls out of Teatro Colón's Andrea Chénier.

    When Angela Gheorghiu cancelled Teatro Colón's Adriana Lecouvreur, she was castigated; when another singer cancels, it's the fault of the opera house.
    Maybe because Álvarez is habitually reliable, whereas Angela built up a bit of a reputation that is hard to shake off....
    Natalie

  20. #1859
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    Maybe because Álvarez is habitually reliable, whereas Angela built up a bit of a reputation that is hard to shake off....
    I know but it seems unfair.

    Talking of Angela, Wiener Staatsoper are streaming Tosca with AG and JK for free on 08 May. Register here.

    It will initially show a charge but when you click accept the price reverts to €0.

    Lets hope the soprano doesn't go missing this time.


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  22. #1860
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    Maybe because Álvarez is habitually reliable, whereas Angela built up a bit of a reputation that is hard to shake off....
    She wanted "righteous respect and admiration" from the theater - I wonder if she placed unreasonably high demands on the theater, in her usual narcissistic way, and when they were not fulfilled, she walked out. It is also telling that Álvarez remained quiet while Gheorghiu took to social media to disparage the theater.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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