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  1. #556
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    More details - it seems like the performance wasn't stopped at 30 minutes after all. It does seem like the opera house got scared of the medical-legal consequences.

    ----------

    From DW:

    Saying that they were aware of the dramatization's potential for "controversy," the Deutsche Oper am Rhein (German Opera on the Rhine) said it had underestimated the effect of the display.

    "We react with the greatest of concern to the fact that some scenes, especially the very realistic depiction of execution at gun point, led to such a strong physical and psychological impact on numerous visitors, that they had to seek medical attention afterwards," the opera house said in its statement published on Wednesday evening. Another contentious scene appeared to depict execution in gas chambers.

    "In an intensive discussion with the director Burkhard C. Kosminski we talked about the possibility of changing some individual scenes," the opera house said. "He refused to this on artistic grounds. Obviously we are legally obliged to respect the artistic freedom of the director."

    As a result, the show would continue only as a concert, with people welcome to exchange their tickets if they were no longer interested in the Tannhäuser performance.

    'The most turbulent evening I have experienced'

    There had been no official call to cancel the show, although the local "Rheinische Post" spoke of a "Nazi scandal" on its front page after the Saturday premiere. The director of Düsseldorf's Jewish Community Michael Szentei-Heiser called the dramatization "tasteless," but said he would not ask for the show to be stopped. Although Wagner was an "ardent anti-Semite," Szentei-Heise said he had nothing to do with the Holocaust. Wagner's music was adopted and used by the Adolf Hitler and his Nazi party, 50 years after the musician's death.

    An opera expert for local public classical music radio station WDR3, Ulrike Gondorf, attended the premiere.

    "It was a very, very stormy evening, certainly the most turbulent I have ever experienced at the Düsseldorf opera. Not just at the end, when Burkhard Kosminski faced a wall of boos and cries of protests, but even during the opera," Gondorf said, citing the opening Venusberg scene - usually an erotic and sensual scene of the lady Venus and her nymphs frolicking in little or no attire. But Kosminski's take on the scene was a break from the norm.

    "All these very different people - young and old - were visible in glass chambers, behind glass walls; suddenly smoke, steam, fog streamed in, and they were all lying on the ground. The image of the gas chambers was certainly very strongly present, and you noticed immediately how the tension mounted in the room, how the people found this image very trying," the opera critic explained.

    The summary execution of a family by the protagonist Tannhäuser, who wore a Swastika armband, appeared a depiction of the killing of Jewish deportees, Gondorf said: "At that point, for the first time, the whole evening was really on the brink."

    This scene was set without any music, and Gondorf noted this unusual attempt to stop the audible element of an opera betrayed the fact that Kosminski, Mannheim's theater director, had never dramatized an opera before.

    "I believe this, at the latest, should have served as a clear indication of a beginner at work," Gondorf said on WDR3.

    -----------

    OK, folks, there you go... the Regie tried to stop the audible element of the opera. Tsk, tsk...

    OK, yes. Out-of-control-Regie, for sure.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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    Staff Writer & Reviewer - Life-time Donor Veteran Member Jephtha's Avatar
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    I dread the day when they actually start re-writing the words of the libretti. They have already started in on the music. In this production of Mozart's La finta giardiniera




    conducted by my (usually) beloved Harnoncourt, several of the recits are shouted in a sort of toneless Sprechstimme that has nothing to do with Mozart's score. I am hoping no one else goes down this particular road, because if they do, the musical side of opera is doomed.
    How far that little candle throws his beams!
    So shines a good deed in a naughty world.


    The Merchant of Venice, V, i.

  3. #558
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Dark_Angel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Almaviva View Post
    More details - it seems like the performance wasn't stopped at 30 minutes after all. It does seem like the opera house got scared of the medical-legal consequences.

    ----------

    From DW:

    Saying that they were aware of the dramatization's potential for "controversy," the Deutsche Oper am Rhein (German Opera on the Rhine) said it had underestimated the effect of the display.

    "We react with the greatest of concern to the fact that some scenes, especially the very realistic depiction of execution at gun point, led to such a strong physical and psychological impact on numerous visitors, that they had to seek medical attention afterwards," the opera house said in its statement published on Wednesday evening. Another contentious scene appeared to depict execution in gas chambers.

    "In an intensive discussion with the director Burkhard C. Kosminski we talked about the possibility of changing some individual scenes," the opera house said. "He refused to this on artistic grounds. Obviously we are legally obliged to respect the artistic freedom of the director."

    As a result, the show would continue only as a concert, with people welcome to exchange their tickets if they were no longer interested in the Tannhäuser performance.

    'The most turbulent evening I have experienced'

    There had been no official call to cancel the show, although the local "Rheinische Post" spoke of a "Nazi scandal" on its front page after the Saturday premiere. The director of Düsseldorf's Jewish Community Michael Szentei-Heiser called the dramatization "tasteless," but said he would not ask for the show to be stopped. Although Wagner was an "ardent anti-Semite," Szentei-Heise said he had nothing to do with the Holocaust. Wagner's music was adopted and used by the Adolf Hitler and his Nazi party, 50 years after the musician's death.

    An opera expert for local public classical music radio station WDR3, Ulrike Gondorf, attended the premiere.

    "It was a very, very stormy evening, certainly the most turbulent I have ever experienced at the Düsseldorf opera. Not just at the end, when Burkhard Kosminski faced a wall of boos and cries of protests, but even during the opera," Gondorf said, citing the opening Venusberg scene - usually an erotic and sensual scene of the lady Venus and her nymphs frolicking in little or no attire. But Kosminski's take on the scene was a break from the norm.

    "All these very different people - young and old - were visible in glass chambers, behind glass walls; suddenly smoke, steam, fog streamed in, and they were all lying on the ground. The image of the gas chambers was certainly very strongly present, and you noticed immediately how the tension mounted in the room, how the people found this image very trying," the opera critic explained.

    The summary execution of a family by the protagonist Tannhäuser, who wore a Swastika armband, appeared a depiction of the killing of Jewish deportees, Gondorf said: "At that point, for the first time, the whole evening was really on the brink."

    This scene was set without any music, and Gondorf noted this unusual attempt to stop the audible element of an opera betrayed the fact that Kosminski, Mannheim's theater director, had never dramatized an opera before.

    "I believe this, at the latest, should have served as a clear indication of a beginner at work," Gondorf said on WDR3.

    -----------

    OK, folks, there you go... the Regie tried to stop the audible element of the opera. Tsk, tsk...

    OK, yes. Out-of-control-Regie, for sure.
    Someone forget to tell the director that opening Venusburg scence is about sexual indulgence and non stop sensual pleasures that would make a mortal never want to leave, not sadistic killings, extreme brutality, genocide......

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  5. #559
    Senior Member Veteran Member Aksel's Avatar
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    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    I suspect that what really has officials at the Deutsche Oper am Rhein worried is the prospect of strong public pushback at a time when many local and municipal governments in Germany (and elsewhere) are cutting arts funding. Angry taxpayers might very well be a cause for concern, especially when a good chunk of your budget is coming from public sources.

    But again, I see a silver lining in this cloud if it finally triggers some serious public discourse about all of the issues this incident has raised, including why so many opera companies are engaging directors with absolutely no experience in producing operas.

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    Delia Rigal dead at 92:


  9. #562
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Some of his points are well taken - especially the part about criticizing without seeing it, one of the very things I've been insisting upon lately. But he also goes a bit over the top, comparing those critics to Nazis themselves, whoa! Because, see, one doesn't need to have seen the production to criticize this part: "This scene was set without any music, and Gondorf noted this unusual attempt to stop the audible element of an opera betrayed the fact that Kosminski, Mannheim's theater director, had never dramatized an opera before. I believe this, at the latest, should have served as a clear indication of a beginner at work."

    I mean, as a matter of principle - the defense of the operatic art form which is one of the main missions of this web site - I don't think there is a way I'll ever NOT criticize a stage director who decides to stage parts of an opera... without operatic music!!! This is so hugely misguided in terms of understanding what this art form is, that one doesn't need to attend such production to criticize it. I don't think there is any justification whatsoever to mute the orchestra and the singers and go on with a theatrical scene without the music. You want to do this? Go direct stage plays. Opera has music, dammit!

    I understand your fascination with all forms of innovative theater, Aksel, and that's fine. But whoa... aren't we going too far, if directors start to think that the music in opera is spendable and optional, not required???

    As I've said many times, I have nothing against these experiments as long as people then don't call them opera. If a director wants to do something like this and calls it "Theater with occasional incidental music based on Wagner's Tannhäuser" then fine, do it at will, be my guest. But don't silence the orchestra and the singers and still keep calling it Wagner's Tannhäuser.

    Like I said before, I have nothing against the Broadway musical Rent, which is based on La Bohème and follows the story pretty closely (there is a Mimi, she comes to her neighbor's apartment with a candle, can't find her key in the dark, she is sick - with HIV, not TB, but fine - the young man falls in love with her, and so on). The score is changed and is made into pop musical genres. It's fine musical theater, I actually like it. But hey, it's not La Bohème, and I praise its producers for not calling it La Bohème, while still acknowledging in all letters that it is *based on* Puccini's La Bohème. But staging Tannhäuser with added theatrical scenes that have no music, is not Tannhäuser. It may even be interesting musical theater, but Tannhäuser it is not (the original has no such non-musical scenes), so don't call it such.

    What irks me the most in Regietheater is this arrogance of profoundly altering the original (such as, completely changing the ending, adding new characters, subtracting characters - all of which we've seen in different Regie productions - doing this kind of stuff that Kosminski did of adding new non-musical scenes) and still calling it by the original name, trying to cash on the fame of the original composer and his piece. You want to do innovative theater by profoundly altering the work you're putting on stage? Then have the guts to call it something else. The Rent people did, and they succeeded. Updating, having a Konzept, changing the staging itself: generally fine (barred some extremes), in my opinion. Changing endings, characters, subtracting characters, adding new scenes, etc. - not fine, in my opinion, if you want to continue to call it by its original name.

    Of course, coming up with a different name and saying "based on" is not as attractive because while Richard Wagner has a reputation for being one of the major artists humankind has ever produced and his fame lives on decades after his death, Mr. Kosminski is a nobody who will be forgotten after his death. So people may want to come and buy tickets to see one of Wagner's works... while they may be a lot less inclined to buy tickets to see one of Mr. Kosminski's works. So, commercially, it makes sense to call it Tannhäuser... But that's cowardly. If this gentleman thinks he is such a genius, then he should be bold enough to give a different title to his concoction, and merely say that it is based on Wagner's work.

    So, in the thoughts of this blogger, if I criticize a stage director who silences the orchestra and the singers while staging OPERA, that means I'm a Nazi because I did it without seeing the production? I don't think so...
    Last edited by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva); May 10th, 2013 at 07:02 PM.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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  11. #563
    Senior Member Veteran Member Aksel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Almaviva View Post
    Some of his points are well taken - especially the part about criticizing without seeing it, one of the very things I've been insisting upon lately. But he also goes a bit over the top, comparing those critics to Nazis themselves, whoa! Because, see, one doesn't need to have seen the production to criticize this part: "This scene was set without any music, and Gondorf noted this unusual attempt to stop the audible element of an opera betrayed the fact that Kosminski, Mannheim's theater director, had never dramatized an opera before. I believe this, at the latest, should have served as a clear indication of a beginner at work."
    Indeed. We are both guilty of this (need I mention the Oslo Bohéme, or even the Oslo Poppea?).

    I mean, as a matter of principle - the defense of the operatic art form which is one of the main missions of this web site - I don't think there is a way I'll ever NOT criticize a stage director who decides to stage parts of an opera... without operatic music!!! This is so hugely misguided in terms of understanding what this art form is, that one doesn't need to attend such production to criticize it. I don't think there is any justification whatsoever to mute the orchestra and the singers and go on with a theatrical scene without the music. You want to do this? Go direct stage plays. Opera has music, dammit!

    I understand your fascination with all forms of innovative theater, Aksel, and that's fine. But whoa... aren't we going too far, if directors start to think that the music in opera is spendable and optional, not required???

    As I've said many times, I have nothing against these experiments as long as people then don't call them opera. If a director wants to do something like this and calls it "Theater with occasional incidental music based on Wagner's Tannhäuser" then fine, do it at will, be my guest. But don't silence the orchestra and the singers and still keep calling it Wagner's Tannhäuser.
    I must have missed the memo. When did having silent bits without music become controversial again? Because it really isn't.
    No music was cut or added, it was simply stopped (nobody knows exactly were, but speculation is that it was between scene 1 and 2 in the first act).
    Also, did we learn nothing from John Cage?

    What irks me the most in Regietheater is this arrogance of profoundly altering the original (such as, completely changing the ending, adding new characters, subtracting characters - all of which we've seen in different Regie productions - doing this kind of stuff that Kosminski did of adding new non-musical scenes) and still calling it by the original name, trying to cash on the fame of the original composer and his piece. You want to do innovative theater by profoundly altering the work you're putting on stage? Then have the guts to call it something else. The Rent people did, and they succeeded. Updating, having a Konzept, changing the staging itself: generally fine (barred some extremes), in my opinion. Changing endings, characters, subtracting characters, adding new scenes, etc. - not fine, in my opinion, if you want to continue to call it by its original name.
    The author is dead. Deal with it.

  12. #564
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aksel View Post
    Indeed. We are both guilty of this (need I mention the Oslo Bohéme, or even the Oslo Poppea?).
    Touché. Although we're talking apples and oranges. These posts were in the context of debating Regietheater techniques and we were commenting upon whether or not such devices were valid. So, I gave opinion on those devices, as reported (altered sequence of events in Bohème, cucumber slicing in Poppea as depicted - as in, shown in pictures and video clips within the same thread). So, someone posts something describing a production, including pictures and videos; the issue comes up of whether or not these deviations from the original are valid, and someone else -- in that case, me, and also others -- gives an opinion on whether or not the person accepts the concepts being proposed -- *specifically on the issues being described and depicted/shown* -- that's kind of normal for a debate, and it's a bit different than posting a critique of the performance of the Giulio Cesare interpreters regarding subsequent acts, after having heard just the first act, including, an assessment of how they "must" have performed subsequent arias in acts you hadn't listened to. That's a whole other order of magnitude of critique without seeing the piece.

    I must have missed the memo. When did having silent bits without music become controversial again? Because it really isn't.
    No music was cut or added, it was simply stopped (nobody knows exactly were, but speculation is that it was between scene 1 and 2 in the first act).
    Sorry. You stop the music, silence the singers and the orchestra, and add a full scene without music, and think you're staging opera? Thanks, but no, thanks. About the memo you missed, well, it did generate controversy (I quoted an article on DW that challenges this very point), so, yes, it looks like you missed the memo.

    Also, did we learn nothing from John Cage?
    Oh, come on. Do you really mean what you just said? If you're performing Cage's silent piece, then you're performing a work of art that *requires* silence. Going on with an spurious scene in an opera that didn't have that scene before, with no music playing, it's a totally different thing, and it ain't opera.

    The author is dead. Deal with it.
    Wow. That's how you gauge artistic integrity, huh? Based on whether the author of the piece is dead or not? Great. The artist is dead. Let's paint something over the Sistine Chapel roof, who cares, Michelangelo is dead. Maybe we should rip off the Mona Lisa into several strips and make some nice origami of the bands. Who cares? Da Vinci is dead. Hey, let's melt The Thinker and make some bronze sculptures of little dogs out of it. Who cares? Rodin is dead.
    Last edited by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva); May 11th, 2013 at 12:25 AM.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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  14. #565
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Let me make the point clear again. It's not like I'm against alterations of the works of dead artists (or live artists for that matter) to become new pieces of art based on or inspired by the original. It's just how you call it, and what you pretend your new work is.

    See, when Eugène Bataille added to Da Vinci's Mona Lisa a pipe and rings of smoke which weren't in Da Vinci's original, he called his piece "Le Rire." He didn't call it Mona Lisa. "Le Rire" by Eugène Bataille, based on the Mona Lisa with additions, has never pretended to *be* the Mona Lisa by Da Vinci.

    When Andy Warhol made his serigraph prints based on the Mona Lisa adding lots of color and manipulations of the shapes, he called them "Thirty Are Better Than One." He didn't call them Mona Lisa. "Thirty Are Better Than One" by Andy Warhol, inspired by the Mona Lisa with color and shape alterations, has never pretended to *be* the Mona Lisa by Da Vinci.

    It's fine for the Oslo company to make a Bohème with completely altered sequence of events and with essential points of the story changed. Just, don't call it La Bohème. Call it something else, inspired by La Bohème. That's fine. That's what the Rent producers did.

    It has *nothing* to do with whether or not the original artist is dead. If Da Vinci were some sort of immortal being and were still alive at the time when Bataille and Warhol made their pieces, presumably they'd still not call their pieces "Mona Lisa by Da Vinci." He is dead, and they still did not commit some undue appropriation of his work, altering it, and still calling it the same thing. It doesn't become OK to do so just because Da Vinci is dead. This is because Warhol and Bataille have artistic integrity. They based their work on someone else's, and appropriately called it something else.

    Many of these extreme Regie directors do not have the same artistic integrity shown by Warhol, Bataille, and the producers of Rent. They do try to sell their pieces as if they were indeed staging the original opera.

    The funny thing is how these directors think it's all fine to do this, when it's opera. Imagine a film director taking Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, editing in some new scenes of his own doing, deleting some characters, digitally adding some other characters, changing the ending, and then showing the piece in cinemas with no warning to the public, calling it "Citizen Kane by Orson Welles," and pretending and sustaining that the resulting piece *is* the original work by Welles.

    Can you imagine the outcry?

    Why is it OK, when it's opera, to make Brunnhilde be pregnant and give birth to a child (being said child a character who wasn't there before and completely alters the arc of the Gods perishing without leaving behind any offspring so that humankind can carry on, on its own) and still call the resulting piece Gotterdämmerung by Richard Wagner, or stage an opera where the essential character Bassa Selim, the Pasha, is nowhere to be seen and still call it Die Entführung aus dem Serail by W. A. Mozart?

    Try this trick with classic cinema, and people will boo you out of the theater and will throw rotting vegetables at you. Try it with opera, and you're heralded (by some) as a great stage director with a great Konzept.

    See, even Hollywood gets this (mostly). They often do American remakes of European movies. Most of the time they don't call the new movie by the same name. In some unfortunate and regrettable cases, at times they do call it by the same name which is a disgrace. But most of the time they come up with an alternative title, then they credit the original by saying on the credits, movie website, posters, etc., that the new movie is a remake of such and such original by such and such film director. That's how, for example, the French movie La Femme Nikita got an American remake, which had the exact same story, but was called Point of No Return. And hey, there wasn't even any significant change... just, different actors/actresses speaking in English rather than in French. Still, they were careful enough to acknowledge that it was a different movie, based on the original.

    Why in the hell in opera people seem to feel free to alter the original at will, and still pretend it's the original??? Hey, I'm not a radical on this. I don't mind an interesting Konzept, an update, an innovative and inventive staging, while preserving all the essential elements and the music. But if you add whole new scenes, delete characters, add characters, change endings, change sequences of events, change essential elements of the plot, etc., etc., in the name of some directorial concept, then, call it differently and have the balls to say it's an adaptation, it's based upon the original, but it is not the original.

    Nope, I can't endorse it. When these people in the future hopefully develop the artistic integrity of calling their altered operas something else *based upon* the original, then I'll applaud (as I have applauded Rent, and rather like Andy Warhol's serigraphs). Until then, I'll boo.
    Last edited by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva); May 11th, 2013 at 06:44 PM.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    It may just be the natural progression of things. Regietheater may be a normal expectation in some countries, but the problem is that it has to keep outdoing itself in order for new "avant-garde" productions to be able to distinguish themselves from earlier, perhaps more "banal" efforts. The risk is that a fine line of acceptable taste/out-of-bounds will get crossed from time to time - it's the nature of the beast.

    I like the idea of experimental theater and even hunger for it in the face of low risk American opera productions. I want to see another point of view, another perspective on what the composer was trying to convey. I do not, however, expect or want to see gas chambers and executions - if I want that, I can watch Inglorious Bastards. Unfortunately, without seeing the entire Tannhäuser production, it's hard to know whether or how the Director communicated the theme of redemption that is key to the opera. If the ending succeeds in reconciling/redeeming the evils from the earlier acts, maybe he's on to something.

    Maybe if they had appended "Springtime for Hitler"...

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  18. #567
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dark_Angel View Post
    Someone forget to tell the director that opening Venusburg scence is about sexual indulgence and non stop sensual pleasures that would make a mortal never want to leave, not sadistic killings, extreme brutality, genocide......
    Although, to play devil's advocate, one could argue that we're talking about two sides of the same coin.

    The sexuality evoked in the Tannhauser overture (the later "Paris" version, anyway) is of a particularly harsh, brutal character. In the scene that follows, Venus’s “love” for Tannhauser is revealed as a desire to exert absolute control over him. It's a commonplace in psychological circles that sexual dysfunction (and crime) is rooted in the desire for power and control. In that sense, grandiose fantasies of "sexual indulgence and non-stop sexual pleasures" are not far removed from the Nazi drive for domination that resulted in "sadistic killings, extreme brutality, genocide. "

    It's no accident that Nazi uniforms were designed to be as seductively alluring as possible, or that a similar look is standard in domination and bondage scenarios today. In the end, SS and S/M touch on some of the same dark impulses.

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    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amfortas View Post
    Although, to play devil's advocate, one could argue that we're talking about two sides of the same coin.

    The sexuality evoked in the Tannhauser overture (the later "Paris" version, anyway) is of a particularly harsh, brutal character. In the scene that follows, Venus’s “love” for Tannhauser is revealed as a desire to exert absolute control over him. It's a commonplace in psychological circles that sexual dysfunction (and crime) is rooted in the desire for power and control. In that sense, grandiose fantasies of "sexual indulgence and non-stop sexual pleasures" are not far removed from the Nazi drive for domination that resulted in "sadistic killings, extreme brutality, genocide. "
    ^ a stretch.
    Will you go this far to defend some Regie Konzept gone wrong?
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  20. #569
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Almaviva View Post
    ^ a stretch.
    Will you go this far to defend some Regie Konzept gone wrong?
    I don't see it as a stretch at all, especially since we've seen the perverse eroticism of Nazi domination explored in numerous films (Visconti's The Damned, Cavani's The Night Porter, Wertmüller's Seven Beauties).

    As for the production in question, I haven't seen it and can't comment on its effectiveness. All I can say is that the connection it seems to make is not inherently absurd.

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    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amfortas View Post
    I don't see it as a stretch at all, especially since we've seen the perverse eroticism of Nazi domination explored in numerous films (Visconti's The Damned, Cavani's The Night Porter, Wertmüller's Seven Beauties).

    As for the production in question, I haven't seen it and can't comment on its effectiveness. All I can say is that the connection it seems to make is not inherently absurd.
    Oh, come on. Venusberg = hedonism, lust, eroticism
    This production = a family being shaved and executed, gas chambers. Yeah, right. Very erotic. Almost the same thing. Gas chambers are a well known symbolism for lovemaking.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Asheville Lyric Opera

Official Media Partners of UNC Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of UNC Opera
Dept. of Music, UNC-Chapel Hill College of Arts and Sciences

www.operalively.com

VISIT WWW.OPERALIVELY.COM FOR ALL YOUR OPERA NEEDS