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  1. #46
    Schigolch
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    The tenor Giovanni Consiglio, a veteran of the American Opera Houses, died recently at 89 years old.

    He was a good singer, and would probably had deserved a more brilliant career.

    A couple of examples of his art:




  2. #47
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    R.I.P.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  3. #48
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Met to adopt flexible pricing.

    Darn, it will become more expensive to see Anna Netrebko.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  4. #49
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Almaviva View Post
    Met to adopt flexible pricing.

    Darn, it will become more expensive to see Anna Netrebko.
    And Jonas Kaufmann.

    I don't know about this bringing more people into the house, as Mr. Gelb claims is one of the objectives. I'm far more inclined to believe his second reason: that it will increase revenue.

  5. #50
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Oh, I do think that his first objective is to increase revenue, but bringing more people into the house is certainly among his preocuppations, just like those of any other opera manager, because letting students and young people in is an investment for the future, since these people grow up, graduate, make money, and become more heavily paying customers and supporters, so I'm sure lowering the price of the cheapest tickets *is* a legitimate concern of his, since it is in tune with the global objective of increasing revenue and sustainability in the long run. He's thinking short term *and* long term. He's a good manager. He got the Met out of the red, it's profitable again, and I don't mind it, because I do think that the opera business must survive and thrive in order to keep the artistic side of it going. I'm all for Mr. Gelb, he's been realistic and innovative. Of course I don't support everything that he does, but overall I think he's been good for the Met.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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  7. #51
    Senior Member Involved Member jflatter's Avatar
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    Rusalka at Covent Garden

    Looks like some controversy here. However I cannot wait to see it at the weekend now. I think Alma like some of it attributes as well.

    http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standa...se-audience.do

  8. #52
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Hehehe, that's funny. But these ladies are not very good looking. I'd book my trip to London immediately if this was done with Kristine Opolais, Patricia Petibon, Isabel Leonard, or Tamara Mumford.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  9. #53
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    Looks like some controversy here.
    No controversy. These things got so cliche that it's even more cliche to discuss point and value (or rather lack of it) of this kind of productions. These days we just go to opera and expect such crap with resignation. In XIXth century people thought "I hope they will give good performance, though I know that there will be barely any acting since the primadonna will show off and enjoy herself with her custome being only sign reminding us that she was meant to be some kind of dramatic character", today we think "I hope they will give good performance, though I know that there will hardly be anything worth of watching on stage since director-moron will show off and enjoy himself with sung text of libretto being the only sign reminding us what the opera was actually all about".

    The standards of operatic performance, as we see, never progresses and improved from the beginning of it's existence. It's just that they left one kind of absurd and weakness for the sake of other.

  10. #54
    Senior Member Involved Member jflatter's Avatar
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    http://boulezian.blogspot.com/2012/0...uary-2012.html

    This is a review that likes the production but the review itself could wind up certain people....

  11. #55
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    I haven't seen the production, and don't know how I would feel about it. But I appreciate a review, like that in the Boulezian, that tries to engage with the concept sympathetically, rather than dismissing it outright.

    Edit: Then again, the reviewer could have engaged with the *audience* and their objections more sympathetically, rather than dismissing them outright.
    Last edited by Amfortas; February 28th, 2012 at 08:58 PM.

  12. #56
    Senior Member Involved Member jflatter's Avatar
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    I haven't seen the production but will on Saturday. However I have always wondered what is a traditional Rusalka. It is a fairy tale after all not set in any particular time and as long as it has a good concept then I won't have a problem with it. The Kusej/Munich Rusalka on Blu Ray is a definitive example in my opinion. However if it is lazy then it will criticised. It is not like Tosca where is set at a very specific point in time.

    At least by all accounts I will have a good musical evening.

  13. #57
    Senior Member Veteran Member Aksel's Avatar
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    JDD cancels her upcoming Ariodante tour. In her stead will be Sarah Conolly.

  14. #58
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aramis View Post
    No controversy. These things got so cliche that it's even more cliche to discuss point and value (or rather lack of it) of this kind of productions. These days we just go to opera and expect such crap with resignation. In XIXth century people thought "I hope they will give good performance, though I know that there will be barely any acting since the primadonna will show off and enjoy herself with her custome being only sign reminding us that she was meant to be some kind of dramatic character", today we think "I hope they will give good performance, though I know that there will hardly be anything worth of watching on stage since director-moron will show off and enjoy himself with sung text of libretto being the only sign reminding us what the opera was actually all about".

    The standards of operatic performance, as we see, never progresses and improved from the beginning of it's existence. It's just that they left one kind of absurd and weakness for the sake of other.
    Maybe this kind of extreme Regie will fade away with time, it's a fad. We all want to see a creative production, but in my opinion, within certain limits - one that is not a complete travesty and does not entirely tamper with the libretto, one that respects the music.

    There are successful productions like this - plenty of them. But there are also horribly misguided productions.

    On the other hand, there are successful traditional productions, and there are also those that are boring and pale.

    It's a question of competence and intelligence. Unfortunately, the gene pool in the human species codifies for high intelligence only rarely. Intelligent people, creative people, competent people will always be a minority. So we get a lot of crap - and far and in between, we get great productions done by smart people, and these can occur both in the traditional and the avant-garde modalities.

    Take two Glyndebourne productions - Giulio Cesare, and Cosė fan Tutte. The first one is updated and quite extreme in certain regards. The second one couldn't be more traditional. They are done by the same opera company, and they are both outstanding. Why? Because Glyndebourne is a competent company, full of smart and creative people.

    So, the key is not whether a production is traditional or Regie. The key is whether it is well done, conceptually sound, and with good understanding of the music.

    I saw a production of Benvenuto Cellini with Star War robots and helicopters. Somehow, it worked, and was quite compelling.
    On the other hand, I saw a fairly traditional Faust that I hated with all my guts.

    So it depends.

    I'm a lot more troubled by tampering with the plot (alternative endings, etc) then with whether the production places the opera in its intended time period or not.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  15. #59
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jflatter View Post
    http://boulezian.blogspot.com/2012/0...uary-2012.html

    This is a review that likes the production but the review itself could wind up certain people....
    It did. I found the reviewer extremely arrogant. How does he know that all of those who were booing were unintelligent or representatives of the petite bourgeoisie? Maybe they were booing because... the production was misguided.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  16. #60
    Schigolch
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    The petite bourgeoisie?.... My God, this does sound outdated!. It makes me feel like a teenager living in the 1970s again.

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