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    Opera Lively Coordinator - Donor Member Top Contributor Member tyroneslothrop's Avatar
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    Unfortunate: Fiona Shaw to Replace Deborah Warner in Directing Met Opera’s ‘Eugene Onegin’ [clicky]
    “The hand of Providence creeps among the stars, giving Slothrop the finger.”
    ― Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

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    Opera Lively Coordinator - Donor Member Top Contributor Member tyroneslothrop's Avatar
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    Provocative Opera Directors: [clicky]

    I agree and disagree with the first sentiment. As we saw recently, conductors do walk out of productions that they find to be too much.
    “The hand of Providence creeps among the stars, giving Slothrop the finger.”
    ― Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

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    Opera Lively Coordinator - Donor Member Top Contributor Member tyroneslothrop's Avatar
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    Followup to the Thomas Hampson interview: And in This Corner: A Baritone Fights For Opera On The BBC [clicky]
    “The hand of Providence creeps among the stars, giving Slothrop the finger.”
    ― Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

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    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tyroneslothrop View Post
    Very impressive. Glyndebourne has been filling 96% of their seats also. The Met needs to take a page from their book. [clicky]
    What's the Met's percentage?
    All I know is that the Met has been again operating in the black.
    So is Santa Fe Opera - they just told me the same - they added "not by much, but we are again in the black."
    Looking at the Santa Fe Crosby Theater, I pretty much had the impression that they sold out, every night I was there. When I was getting a ticket for my son to attend La Traviata, there were like 4 seats left in the entire theater. I bet the other three were gone as well, by curtain time.

    I was just looking again, and several performances at Glimmerglass are sold out.

    It's interesting to notice that unlike all the prophets of doom were saying, opera companies are bouncing back and are becoming profitable again.

    Even a regional opera company like Opera Carolina routinely sells out its fairly large theater (2,100 seats).

    Opera is back in business, baby!
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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    Opera Lively Coordinator - Donor Member Top Contributor Member tyroneslothrop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    What's the Met's percentage?
    All I know is that the Met has been again operating in the black.
    [clicky]
    “The hand of Providence creeps among the stars, giving Slothrop the finger.”
    ― Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

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    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tyroneslothrop View Post
    Followup to the Thomas Hampson interview: And in This Corner: A Baritone Fights For Opera On The BBC [clicky]
    I really love this man. He is one of the most intelligent artists I've ever talked to. Thomas Hampson rocks!
    Last edited by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva); August 7th, 2013 at 01:07 AM.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tyroneslothrop View Post
    81%??? That sucks!
    Yes, those tickets were getting too expensive. They got a bit greedy.

    You know, I don't understand these intendants, sometimes.

    If you know that you'll get 19% of your tickets empty, not generating any revenue, why not offer them at really slashed down prices?
    So, the tickets in the back will be $25, $5 more than before? Well, get those 19% of empty seats offered by $10, them. That's 760 tickets, @ $10, that's $7,600 per performance. With the season lasting for 8 months with an average of five performances per week, that's about 180 performances; that's approximately $1,368,000 - why would the Met want to pass on making another million and a third, even if it is peanuts in their budget, while at the same time making opera more popular and more accessible?

    Of course, many of those empty seats will be at the most expensive locations in the theater, but hey, can you imagine the huge attraction? They'd say, "unsold tickets regardless of location will cost $10 for the last 24 hours before the performance." I bet most of them would sell.

    That's one way Opera Carolina pretty much ensures that they're always sold out. If a chunk of tickets is not moving, they get into promotions and sales - "get any seat left, anywhere in the house, for $... for the next 48 hours" they say, by emailing their patrons through e-blasts. It's silly to have an empty seat and not collect any money for it.

    So, you'd say, this might backfire, and people would refrain from buying until 24 hours before curtain time? Not likely. Most people want to secure their seats and don't want the randomness. These ultra-cheap seats would sell to broke students and backpacking tourists or broke musicians.

    The only problem is, some of the rich patrons would turn their noses up by seeing the riffraff occupying those expensive seats right next to them, LOL.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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    Opera Lively Coordinator - Donor Member Top Contributor Member tyroneslothrop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    81%??? That sucks!
    Yes, those tickets were getting too expensive. They got a bit greedy.

    You know, I don't understand these intendants, sometimes.

    If you know that you'll get 19% of your tickets empty, not generating any revenue, why not offer them at really slashed down prices?
    So, the tickets in the back will be $25, $5 more than before? Well, get those 19% of empty seats offered by $10, them. That's 760 tickets, @ $10, that's $7,600 per performance. With the season lasting for 8 months with an average of five performances per week, that's about 180 performances; that's approximately $1,368,000 - why would the Met want to pass on making another million and a third, even if it is peanuts in their budget, while at the same time making opera more popular and more accessible?

    Of course, many of those empty seats will be at the most expensive locations in the theater, but hey, can you imagine the huge attraction? They'd say, "unsold tickets regardless of location will cost $10 for the last 24 hours before the performance." I bet most of them would sell.

    That's one way Opera Carolina pretty much ensures that they're always sold out. If a chunk of tickets is not moving, they get into promotions and sales - "get any seat left, anywhere in the house, for $... for the next 48 hours" they say, by emailing their patrons through e-blasts. It's silly to have an empty seat and not collect any money for it.

    So, you'd say, this might backfire, and people would refrain from buying until 24 hours before curtain time? Not likely. Most people want to secure their seats and don't want the randomness. These ultra-cheap seats would sell to broke students and backpacking tourists or broke musicians.

    The only problem is, some of the rich patrons would turn their noses up by seeing the riffraff occupying those expensive seats right next to them, LOL.
    Yes, that would never work in Russia as the Russian elite exercise this: [clicky]

    BTW, one of the articles I posted about the Castorf Ring pointed out that tickets at the Salzburg Festival range up to $770 per. Highway robbery.
    Last edited by tyroneslothrop; August 7th, 2013 at 01:11 AM.
    “The hand of Providence creeps among the stars, giving Slothrop the finger.”
    ― Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

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    Member Recent member deNoget's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    So, you'd say, this might backfire, and people would refrain from buying until 24 hours before curtain time? Not likely. Most people want to secure their seats and don't want the randomness. These ultra-cheap seats would sell to broke students and backpacking tourists or broke musicians.
    Back in 2010 in an open letter to the Met about artists' cancelling, an angry subscriber noted this:
    Since I can no longer expect that the announced cast will show up, I will continue to go to the Met, but only purchasing tickets the day of the performance, standing room if need be.

    The Met has said over and over again that they are trying to attract the next generation of opera enthusiasts. I am that audience: a 25 year old professional with the passion to attend the opera. Unfortunately, I’m getting tired of the inconsistency and price. As I consider how I’ll buy tickets next year, it seems more likely that I will be calling for standing room tickets at noon each day I intend to go.

    Rush tickets are not a possibility for me, as I work all day and cannot sit in line. We might as well face the reality that your rush ticket program is not reaching the audience you targeted. Stroll by the rush ticket line any day and you’ll find the same retirees who would have bought family circle had the rush program not been available.
    For source: click

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    Opera Lively Coordinator - Donor Member Top Contributor Member tyroneslothrop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deNoget View Post
    Back in 2010 in an open letter to the Met about artists' cancelling, an angry subscriber noted this:
    For source: click
    I don't know why Devon should think that the Met has anything to do with the cancellations. That makes no sense that the Met would want a cancellation. We already know who Pappano blames for these cancellations: [clicky]
    “The hand of Providence creeps among the stars, giving Slothrop the finger.”
    ― Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

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    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deNoget View Post
    Back in 2010 in an open letter to the Met about artists' cancelling, an angry subscriber noted this:
    For source: click
    Well, that's an exception. Most performances at the Met I've seen, had a rather well-healed crowd, not a bunch of despondent retirees in search of cheap tickets. And like Tyrone said, someone who is clueless enough to blame *the opera house* for the cancellations, is not someone whose opinion we should take seriously. Obviously the house hates cancellations even more than this patron does.

    Anyway, I'm a little baffled with the 81% figure.

    Almost all performances I've attended at the Met recently (and they were many) as well as what we can see from the Live in HD cameras before the opera starts when they pan through the theater, had rather full houses.

    Of course I tend to only travel to NYC to see the most prominent productions and artists, and the Live in HD are also often the compelling ones, so, maybe the house is much emptier when the show features a more secondary cast or an old revival. Still, I find 81% kind of preposterous for the Met, given that it is an average. So, if we think that many of these more prominent shows are completely sold out, to get to this average, we'd need 60% of attendance to an equivalent number of so-so shows. Given that the Met has approximately 4,000 seats, that's 1,600 empty seats, which is kind of hard to believe for a city like New York. What major entertainment venue in NYC leaves 1,600 seats unsold? That's kind of upsetting. I'd never guess the Met's average to be this low.

    When I lived in NYC and attended the Met regularly, again, the house was extremely full and it was hard to find tickets, but then, this was before the economic crisis.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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    Opera Lively Coordinator - Donor Member Top Contributor Member tyroneslothrop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    Anyway, I'm a little baffled with the 81% figure.

    Almost all performances I've attended at the Met recently (and they were many) as well as what we can see from the Live in HD cameras before the opera starts when they pan through the theater, had rather full houses.

    Of course I tend to only travel to NYC to see the most prominent productions and artists, and the Live in HD are also often the compelling ones, so, maybe the house is much emptier when the show features a more secondary cast or an old revival. Still, I find 81% kind of preposterous for the Met, given that it is an average. So, if we think that many of these more prominent shows are completely sold out, to get to this average, we'd need 60% of attendance to an equivalent number of so-so shows. Given that the Met has approximately 4,000 seats, that's 1,600 empty seats, which is kind of hard to believe for a city like New York. What major entertainment venue in NYC leaves 1,600 seats unsold? That's kind of upsetting. I'd never guess the Met's average to be this low.

    When I lived in NYC and attended the Met regularly, again, the house was extremely full and it was hard to find tickets, but then, this was before the economic crisis.
    I'm not surprised. For example, what production in 2013-14 will have the lowest attendance numbers? I'm going to predict the future.... Hmmm.... Two Boys!

    I don't think it's the old productions that are poorly attended--it's the new works and new productions. Here, Kasper Holten explains this phenomenon: (starts around 2:30--especially at 3:40)

    “The hand of Providence creeps among the stars, giving Slothrop the finger.”
    ― Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

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    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tyroneslothrop View Post
    I'm not surprised. For example, what production in 2013-14 will have the lowest attendance numbers? I'm going to predict the future.... Hmmm.... Two Boys!

    I don't think it's the old productions that are poorly attended--it's the new works and new productions. Here, Kasper Holten explains this phenomenon: (starts around 2:30--especially at 3:40)

    I was thinking of the old Magic Flute production; last time I attended it, the house was pretty empty. Sure, the A-B-Cs of this life will always be popular, and sure, many patrons are not prepared for contemporary opera.

    But still, an average of 81% seems quite low to me, for a city like New York where there are always tourists coming from everywhere, and where the disposable income of the population is quite high.

    I'm used to competing for just about everything in NYC... parking space... dinner reservation... even movie theater tickets - always too many people fighting for a limited number of openings. So, to think of a major entertainment venue in NYC as having 1,600 unsold seats is kind of dismal.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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    Opera Lively Coordinator - Donor Member Top Contributor Member tyroneslothrop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    I was thinking of the old Magic Flute production; last time I attended it, the house was pretty empty.
    The one with the English libretto? That is for the kids/family and neither seem to attend in any numbers.
    “The hand of Providence creeps among the stars, giving Slothrop the finger.”
    ― Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

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    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tyroneslothrop View Post
    The one with the English libretto? That is for the kids/family and neither seem to attend in any numbers.
    No, the old one in German, with that final scene that looked like the image of the sun with rays.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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