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Thread: What opera have you been listening to, lately?

          
   
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  1. #2356
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Name:  LeDamnationFaust.jpg
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    and


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  2. #2357
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revenant View Post
    They re-staged that historical production a few years ago. The staging, the singing, the orchestra, the conductor and the acting are all sublime. Unfortunately for me, I don't happen to like most of Lully's music. Rameau leaves him in the dust, imo. But if you like Atys, I can recommend this blue ray of the later production.

    Attachment 3891
    There seems to be quite a bit of agreement that Rameau is considerably superior to Lully. I was rather taken by the Naxos/Ryan Brown recording of Armide, so am interested in hearing more. Aside from a recording of Rameau's Castor et Pollux, and some aria compilations, I don't know his work very well at all - but am looking forward to learning it (especially considering the advocates of Les Indes Galantes when compiling OL's List of Recommended Operas.

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  3. #2358
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revenant View Post
    They re-staged that historical production a few years ago. The staging, the singing, the orchestra, the conductor and the acting are all sublime. Unfortunately for me, I don't happen to like most of Lully's music. Rameau leaves him in the dust, imo. But if you like Atys, I can recommend this blue ray of the later production.

    Attachment 3891
    In the same label, but even better:

    Natalie

  4. #2359
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoffmann View Post

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    This cover wouldn't get me reaching for the 'buy' button
    "The world calls them its singers and poets and artists and storytellers; but they are just people who have never forgotten the way to fairyland."
    Lucy Maud Montgomery

  5. #2360
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sospiro View Post
    This cover wouldn't get me reaching for the 'buy' button
    I would say the opera itself suffers from some mixed results.

    I remember reading in the newspaper an article raving (I don't remember exactly - it might have been "Time" magazine or the New York Times ) about Beverly Sills bringing down the house in this opera. Of course, at the time, I was thinking "so what" - but was still amazed that an operatic performance would be considered news (maybe it was a slow day).

  6. #2361
    Senior Member Involved Member Revenant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sospiro View Post
    This cover wouldn't get me reaching for the 'buy' button
    I prefer the original version in French, Le Siege de Corinthe.
    Never try to teach a pig to sing. You will waste your time and you will annoy the pig.

  7. #2362
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revenant View Post
    I prefer the original version in French, Le Siege de Corinthe.
    I prefer even more the original of the original, Maometto II.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  8. #2363
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoffmann View Post
    There seems to be quite a bit of agreement that Rameau is considerably superior to Lully. I was rather taken by the Naxos/Ryan Brown recording of Armide, so am interested in hearing more. Aside from a recording of Rameau's Castor et Pollux, and some aria compilations, I don't know his work very well at all - but am looking forward to learning it (especially considering the advocates of Les Indes Galantes when compiling OL's List of Recommended Operas).
    I like both Rameau and Lully. I think what happens to the latter is that his operas are less tight and the pace is not as good as Rameau's. Lully's operas can be overlong. Musically speaking however and if we cut some fillers, Lully can be quite beautiful. Still, I do prefer Rameau.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  9. #2364
    Senior Member Involved Member Revenant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    I like both Rameau and Lully. I think what happens to the latter is that his operas are less tight and the pace is not as good as Rameau's. Lully's operas can be overlong. Musically speaking however and if we cut some fillers, Lully can be quite beautiful. Still, I do prefer Rameau.
    Lord, yes... I like a few things by Lully, though. A perennial earworm I have is Bois epais, from Amadis. Can't listen to it too much as it embodies sadness, even depression, much too well.
    Last edited by Revenant; March 5th, 2014 at 06:11 AM. Reason: Post contained repeated entry (?)
    Never try to teach a pig to sing. You will waste your time and you will annoy the pig.

  10. #2365
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    The arrival of Narcissus!
    It is not only the spring flowers that are a delight but also the new shoots. Lysimachia Punctata and Dicentra Spectabilis are amongst my favourite firsts; beautiful miniature fantasy landscapes!

    Now this opera is so beautiful, that if I could, I would grow it in my garden. In fact I think so would Saville gardens. William and Mary would have grown it in their gardens at Het Loo Palace and it would have featured prominently in Monet's paintings.

    The Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh and The Maiden Fevroniya
    (Сказание о невидимом граде Китеже и деве Февронии, Skazaniye o nevidimom grade Kitezhe i deve Fevronii)

    by
    Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (18 March 1844 – 21 June 1908)
    (Николай Андреевич Римский-Корсаков)

    Libretto by
    Vladimir Belsky

    Premiere performance, 7 February 1907, Maryinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg

    Name:  Rimsky-Korsakov The legend of the invisible city of Kitezh.jpg
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    Vladimir Galusin (Grishka Kutyer'ma), Galina Gorchakova (Fevroniya), Nikolai Putilin (Fyodor Poyarok), Nikolai Ohotnikov (Yury Vsevolodovich), Yevgeny Boitsov (Merchant I), Evgeny Fedorov (Merchant II), Nikolai Gassiev (Bear Trainer), Olga Korzhenskaya (Youth), Larissa Diadkova (Alkonost)
    Kirov Opera & Orchestra of the Mariinsky Theatre,
    Valery Gergiev
    Live recording 1994

  11. #2366
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride
    Galina Vishnevskaya (Marfa), Yevgeny Nesterenko (Vasily Stepanovich Sobakin), Irina Arkhipova (Lyubasha), Vladimir Atlantov (Ivan Sergeyevich Lykov), Vladmir Valaytis (Grigory Gryaznoy), Boris Morozov (Malyuta Skuratov), Andrey Sokolov (Yelisey Bomelius)
    Choir and Orchestra of the Bolshoi Theatre,
    Fuat Mansurow
    Recorded 1973

    Name:  Rimsky-Korsakov The Tsars Bride, Fuat Mansurov, Galina Vishnevskaya, Vladmir Antlantov, Irina Ar.jpg
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  12. #2367
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    The arrival of Narcissus!
    It is not only the spring flowers that are a delight but also the new shoots. Lysimachia Punctata and Dicentra Spectabilis are amongst my favourite firsts; beautiful miniature fantasy landscapes!

    Now this opera is so beautiful, that if I could, I would grow it in my garden. In fact I think so would Saville gardens. William and Mary would have grown it in their gardens at Het Loo Palace and it would have featured prominently in Monet's paintings.

    The Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh and The Maiden Fevroniya
    (Сказание о невидимом граде Китеже и деве Февронии, Skazaniye o nevidimom grade Kitezhe i deve Fevronii)

    by
    Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (18 March 1844 21 June 1908)
    (Николай Андреевич Римский-Корсаков)

    Libretto by
    Vladimir Belsky

    Premiere performance, 7 February 1907, Maryinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg

    Name:  Rimsky-Korsakov The legend of the invisible city of Kitezh.jpg
Views: 72
Size:  39.6 KB

    Vladimir Galusin (Grishka Kutyer'ma), Galina Gorchakova (Fevroniya), Nikolai Putilin (Fyodor Poyarok), Nikolai Ohotnikov (Yury Vsevolodovich), Yevgeny Boitsov (Merchant I), Evgeny Fedorov (Merchant II), Nikolai Gassiev (Bear Trainer), Olga Korzhenskaya (Youth), Larissa Diadkova (Alkonost)
    Kirov Opera & Orchestra of the Mariinsky Theatre,
    Valery Gergiev
    Live recording 1994
    Lucky you! Washington just got another 6" (15.2 cm) of snow on Monday with temperatures stuck around 17 F (-8 C) all through the day yesterday.

    However, the sun is out this morning and I am looking forward to temps soaring to about 40 F (a little over 4 C, according to my converter). With enough melting, I'll even be able to get my heavy rear-wheel drive car out of its parking space and drive to see Moby Dick tonight.

    Playing right now:

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  13. #2368
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Washington National Opera: Moby-Dick
    ...featuring massive nautical sets, dazzling visual effects, an achingly beautiful score, and a talented cast.
    Sounds good!

  14. #2369
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Alexander Borodin 1833 - 1887

    Prince Igor
    Libretto by composer after The Lay of the Host of Igor
    Completed by Rimsky-Korskov and Alexander Glazunov

    Boris Martinovich (Igor Svytoslavich), Stefka Evstatieva (Yaroslavna), Kaludi Kaludov (Vladimir Igoryevich), Nicola Ghiuselev (Vladimir Yaroslavich), Nicolai Ghiaurov (Khan Konchak), Alexandrina Milcheva (Konchakovna), Mincho Popov (Ovlur), Stoil Georgiev (Skula), Angel Petkov (Yeroshka) & Elena Stoyanova (Yaroslavna’s Nurse/Polovstian Maiden)
    Sofia Festival Orchestra & Sofia National Opera Chorus,
    Emil Tchakarov
    Recorded 14-20 July 1987, National Palace of Culture, Sofia

    Name:  Borodin Prince Igor.jpg
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  15. #2370
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Rimsky-Korsakov: Kashchey the Immortal
    Alexander Arkhipov (Kashchey The Immortal), Irina Zhurina (The Princess), Nina Terentieva (Kashcheyevna), Vladislav Verestnikov (Prince Ivan Korolevitch) & Vladimir Matorin (The Storm Knight)
    Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra & Yurlov Academic Choir,
    Andrey Chistiakov
    Recording December 1991

    Name:  Rimsky-Korsakov - Kashchey the Immortal, Alexander Arkhipov, Irina Zhurina, Nina Terentieva, And.jpg
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    Unintended allegorical interpretations and lots of explanations as to musical development.



    Not sure. I just like listening to it.


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