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Thread: What opera have you been listening to, lately?

          
   
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  1. #6601
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    Highly recommended if you are open to English language opera. I think it's important musically to hear an opera in its native language. That said, I have had a lot of enjoyment out of the Chandos opera in english series. more effective and efficient for me when available compared to reading a libretto. This is one of my favorite of the series so far (I've so far listened to Barber of Seville, Rhinegold, Walkure, Tosca, and parts of Siegfried and Ernani)

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  3. #6602
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    yes, sometimes venturing in to unknown territories can make it difficult to appreciate the qualities... like my listening today. I was very much looking forward to it but forgot how much such a different interpretation can throw you...

    Attachment 10316

    Bellini: I Capuleti e I Montecchi
    Vivica Genaux (Romeo), Valentina Farcas (Giulietta), Davide Giusti (Tebaldo), Fabrizio Beggi (Lorenzo), Ugo Guagliardo (Capellio)
    Belcanto Chorus & Europa Galante, Fabio Biondi
    Recorded in Rieti (Teatro Flavio Vespasiano), Italy, in September 2014


    so foreign, I might as well have been listening to a Mongolian contemporary opera written in Swahili. Completely thrown, I'll need to stick my head in a bucket of lemon juice (maybe with a dash of gin) and try again.
    I think the proportions for gin in a bucket of lemon juice require more than a dash! But, maybe, that's just me...

  4. #6603
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonata View Post


    Highly recommended if you are open to English language opera. I think it's important musically to hear an opera in its native language. That said, I have had a lot of enjoyment out of the Chandos opera in english series. more effective and efficient for me when available compared to reading a libretto. This is one of my favorite of the series so far (I've so far listened to Barber of Seville, Rhinegold, Walkure, Tosca, and parts of Siegfried and Ernani)
    I noticed that the other day and added it my wish list - despite its being an English translation. Mattiwilda Dobbs was a long-time resident of my building here in Virginia, so am interested to hear what she sounded like.

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  6. #6604
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    yes, sometimes venturing in to unknown territories can make it difficult to appreciate the qualities... like my listening today. I was very much looking forward to it but forgot how much such a different interpretation can throw you...

    so foreign, I might as well have been listening to a Mongolian contemporary opera written in Swahili. Completely thrown, I'll need to stick my head in a bucket of lemon juice (maybe with a dash of gin) and try again.


    Having grown up in Uganda and become fluent, I could have helped you there.

  7. #6605
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    I've always been hesitant to buy the now-legendary 1980 Kubelik Parsifal, since there were no samples available on Amazon or Presto, and only one short clip on YouTube. Recently, though, someone has posted the entire opera there. Not sure how long it will stay up, but I've been listening--enough to confirm all the praise for this recording and make me put it high on my wish list.




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  9. #6606
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Library sign out for the car:
    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

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  11. #6607
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Donizetti: Maria Padilla
    Lois McDonal (Maria), Della Jones (Ines), Graham Clark (Don Ruiz), Christian du Plessis (Don Pedro), Roderick Earle (Ramiro), Ian Caley (Don Luigi), Roderick Kennedy (Don Alfonso)
    London Symphony Orchestra, Geoffrey Mitchell Choir, Alun Francis
    Recorded Henry Wood Hall, June 1980

    Name:  Maria Padilla - Alun Francis 1980, London Symphony Orchestra.jpg
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    We had a discussion a few years ago about Donizetti's operas and one member mentioned Maria Padilla as *quite interesting* and I took note but the recording wasn't available at the time. I think it's more than interesting; dramatic and beautifully performed here, it's definitely worth listening to for Donizetti fans. I'm very happy the record label had a 50% off sale for this!
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  12. #6608
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Caccini, F: La liberazione di Ruggerio dall'isola di Alcina
    Commedia in musica Florence, 1625
    Elena Sartori (harpsichord/direction), Elena Biscuola, Mauro Borgioni, Gabriella Martellacci, Francesca Lombardi Mazzulli, Emanuela Galli, Raffaele Giordani & Yiannis Vassilakis
    Allabastrina, La Pifarescha
    Elena Sartori direction 2016

    Name:  Alcina - Elena Sartori, Allabastrina, La Pifarescha 2016.jpg
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    Joy! A brilliant work brought back to life. Thank you Elena Sartori.

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  14. #6609
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amfortas View Post
    I've always been hesitant to buy the now-legendary 1980 Kubelik Parsifal, since there were no samples available on Amazon or Presto, and only one short clip on YouTube. Recently, though, someone has posted the entire opera there. Not sure how long it will stay up, but I've been listening--enough to confirm all the praise for this recording and make me put it high on my wish list.
    Just a quick followup: Kurt Moll *has* to be the best Gurnemanz of all time.

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  16. #6610
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  17. #6611
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Today:

    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

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  19. #6612
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    From one Caccini to another...

    Name:  L'Euridice - Concerto Italiano, Rinaldo Alessandrini 2013.jpg
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    Caccini, G: Euridice
    Silvia Frigato (Euridice, La Tragedia), Furio Zanasi (Orfeo), Giampaolo Fagotto (Arcetro), Luca Dordolo (Tirsi, Aminta), Sara Mingardo (Dafne, Proserpina), Monica Piccinini (Venere), Antonio Abete (Plutone), Matteo Bellotto (Radamanto) & Mauro Borgioni (Caronte)
    Concerto Italiano, Rinaldo Alessandrini
    Live recording (though studio quality) August 2013 Innsbrucker Festwochen der Alten Musik

    Beautiful early baroque interpretation of the story and a very good production with the best of period specialists.

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  21. #6613
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    Conductor/orchestra: Julius Rudel, Philharmonia Orchestra
    Cast: Frederica von Stade (Cendrillon), Nicolai Gedda (Le Prince Charmant), Jane Berbié (Mme. de la Haltière), Jules Bastin (Pandolfe), Ruth Welting (La Fée), Teresa Cahill (Noémie), Elizabeth Bainbridge (Dorothée)

    This is quite enjoyable – the opera and the recording. Massenet’s version of the Cinderella tale stays closer to the familiar tale than Rossini’s La Cenerentola does, not only in leaving the wicked stepparent a woman and the young lady’s helper a fairy godmother instead of the Prince’s (male) counselor, but also in maintaining the glass slipper (as opposed to a bracelet) as the clue to the heroine’s identity. Where I prefer Rossini’s opera is at the conclusion, with the new Princess’ generous forgiveness of those who had wronged her in the aria “Nacqui all’ affanno.” In contrast, Cendrillon’s ending seems a little anticlimactic, with the nasty Madame de la Haltière suddenly proclaiming she “adores” her stepdaughter, one of her own daughters commenting on the old gal’s cool nerves, and Papa Pandolfe simply observing that everything’s turned out all right.
    The cast is marvelous, beginning with Frederica von Stade’s delightful Lucette/Cendrillon. Ruth Welting’s virtuosic mastery of the fairy godmother’s stratospheric vocal acrobatics is a pleasure to hear, Jane Berbié is wonderful as the haughty stepmother, and Jules Bastin is fine as the long-suffering Pandolfe who finally manages to stand up to his domineering wife. One of the reasons I wanted this particular recording of Cendrillon was for Nicolai Gedda’s Prince Charming. Of course, many people will find the casting of the breeches role of the Prince with a tenor objectionable, which I understand – I usually balk at operas sung in translation instead of the original language. I find the character of the Prince to be rather mopey and self-pitying, and it could be that Massenet wanted to reflect a moody adolescent by writing the part for a mezzo. Still, I do prefer listening to a leading man who actually sounds like a post-pubescent male, and the duets between the two protagonists don’t seem to lose any of their beauty with the lower voice.
    One other benefit: this set comes with a complete libretto, including English and German translations.

  22. #6614
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

  23. #6615
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