Thread: Opera Small Talk

          
   
    Bookmark and Share
  1. #1801
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Midwestern U.S.
    Posts
    2,695
    Post Thanks / Like
    A recent issue of Opera Now contained a review of a new book titled The World’s Best Tenors by Johannes Ifkovits and Evelyn Rillé. The tome gets high marks from the reviewer for both content and presentation – the Austrian journalist and photographer Ifkovits and “stylist” Rillé are well-known in the media for their celebrity photos. This book contains plenty of those, along with interviews of 44 selected tenors. The authors even have a Facebook page devoted to the project:
    https://www.facebook.com/Ten%C3%B6re-704214779598987/
    The book is currently available at the ROH Shop (http://www.roh.org.uk/products/world...enors-hardback) and Amazon.de (https://www.amazon.de/Worlds-Tenors-.../dp/395029564X).
    Naturally, anything devoted to “the world’s best . . . “ involves a certain amount of subjectivity. The reviewer notes the omission of José Cura and Marcelo Álvarez; I (with just as much subjectivity) wonder why the authors included René Kollo but not Siegfried Jerusalem, who was certainly on a par with the former when both were performing. And given that the likes of Cura and Álvarez were left out, I find it strange that Yusif Eyvazov and Benjamin Bruns (among others) are present. Of course, I suppose we can be thankful that Bocelli doesn’t appear anywhere in this book.
    At a cost of €35.50 ($37.99) not even including shipping charges, this is something I may eventually purchase, but at the present, I’d rather put those funds into new recordings.

  2. Likes Amfortas, Hoffmann liked this post
  3. #1802
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,617
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    A recent issue of Opera Now contained a review of a new book titled The World’s Best Tenors by Johannes Ifkovits and Evelyn Rillé. The tome gets high marks from the reviewer for both content and presentation – the Austrian journalist and photographer Ifkovits and “stylist” Rillé are well-known in the media for their celebrity photos. This book contains plenty of those, along with interviews of 44 selected tenors. The authors even have a Facebook page devoted to the project:
    https://www.facebook.com/Ten%C3%B6re-704214779598987/
    The book is currently available at the ROH Shop (http://www.roh.org.uk/products/world...enors-hardback) and Amazon.de (https://www.amazon.de/Worlds-Tenors-.../dp/395029564X).
    Naturally, anything devoted to “the world’s best . . . “ involves a certain amount of subjectivity. The reviewer notes the omission of José Cura and Marcelo Álvarez; I (with just as much subjectivity) wonder why the authors included René Kollo but not Siegfried Jerusalem, who was certainly on a par with the former when both were performing. And given that the likes of Cura and Álvarez were left out, I find it strange that Yusif Eyvazov and Benjamin Bruns (among others) are present. Of course, I suppose we can be thankful that Bocelli doesn’t appear anywhere in this book.
    At a cost of €35.50 ($37.99) not even including shipping charges, this is something I may eventually purchase, but at the present, I’d rather put those funds into new recordings.
    Very interesting, thank you!

    As you say, it's curious why José Cura and Marcelo Álvarez have been left out and Yusif Eyvazov included. I've not seen Eyvazov live but from what I've seen on YouTube, he's mediocre at best.

    Unrelated moan. I disagree with the generalised statement on the Amazon page: " ... No other voice type inspires an audience to go to the opera, as the tenor voice." I know people who are only interested in who the soprano is and a few like yours truly who are only interested in who the bass is.

  4. Likes Amfortas, MAuer, Hoffmann liked this post
  5. #1803
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,617
    Post Thanks / Like
    A Twitter friend is in Paris for Lohengrin and has just posted this. He says it's in black and white so it must be true!


  6. Likes MAuer, Hoffmann liked this post
  7. #1804
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    5,479
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Ann Lander (sospiro) View Post
    Unrelated moan. I disagree with the generalised statement on the Amazon page: " ... No other voice type inspires an audience to go to the opera, as the tenor voice." I know people who are only interested in who the soprano is and a few like yours truly who are only interested in who the bass is.
    or the baritone....
    Natalie

  8. Likes MAuer, Ann Lander (sospiro) liked this post
  9. #1805
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,617
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Ann Lander (sospiro) View Post
    A Twitter friend is in Paris for Lohengrin and has just posted this. He says it's in black and white so it must be true!

    My friend has just messaged (interval) "JK in splendid voice in Act 1 sounding much fresher than for quite a time. No baritenor crooning. Bright and ringing."

  10. Likes Festat, MAuer, Hoffmann, Nemorino liked this post
  11. #1806
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Detroit MI
    Posts
    1,984
    Post Thanks / Like
    Operatic funny from my childhood days. Is this just an extremely poor imitation of Figaro in Barber of Seville, or does something like this happen in Mozart's Figaro opera, (which I have never watched)? I assume Figaro is still a barber in Mozart's opera.

    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

  12. #1807
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    3,325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Umm. No. That's not from Le Nozze di Figaro.

    Mozart's Figaro is much older.

  13. Thanks Florestan thanked for this post
    Likes Amfortas, Florestan liked this post
  14. #1808
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Detroit MI
    Posts
    1,984
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Hoffmann View Post
    Umm. No. That's not from Le Nozze di Figaro.

    Mozart's Figaro is much older.
    Oh, yeah, he is probably about 13 there. Too young for any Figaro. Hence, the poor performance.
    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

  15. Likes Hoffmann liked this post
  16. #1809
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Midwestern U.S.
    Posts
    2,695
    Post Thanks / Like
    Not sure where that melody is from -- may have been something composed for the film, as Alfalfa's singing was always notoriously bad and the subject of humor in these later "Little Rascals" movies. (Though that would have made his attempt at an actual aria even funnier.)

  17. Likes Ann Lander (sospiro), Florestan liked this post
  18. #1810
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    3,793
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    Not sure where that melody is from -- may have been something composed for the film, as Alfalfa's singing was always notoriously bad and the subject of humor in these later "Little Rascals" movies. (Though that would have made his attempt at an actual aria even funnier.)
    Yeah. Musically it has nothing to do with either Mozart or Rossini. Can't speak for Paisiello, though.

  19. Likes MAuer, Hoffmann, Ann Lander (sospiro) liked this post
  20. #1811
    Senior Member Involved Member Nemorino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    122
    Post Thanks / Like
    Okay, I'm ready to ask forgiveness; I've been a foolish dilettante, a hypocritical charlatan. Or perhaps I've been something else, I'll have to ask somebody who knows what those words mean.

    I complained about the fact that Houston Grand Opera is putting on La Traviata in October, and not a Verdi Opera which I am less familiar with (which is all of them). Since then, I learned that Houston put on La Traviata merely five years ago, and with the same Violetta. If anyone should complain, it should be the long-time subscribers who were at that show. Not I, I'm merely a pretentious newb. I'm not actually weary of La Traviata yet; I'm weary of hearing about La Traviata productions. (Also, Dallas Opera is doing La Traviata. Also in October. Also five years after their last one.)

    But I'm just a pretender. I have watched quite a few Verdis on video, but I have NEVER seen a single one in live performance. Not by choice, of course! There just has really been that bad of a Verdi drought in Texas since I've been "into" opera. So, I have no right to turn my nose up at getting to see one of my favorite operas, with new singers who will interpret it in their own way. (Or, for that matter, the 2nd Norma production that is occurring in 2018.)

    Nemorino is unexperienced and impetuous. He should at least turn 40 before he starts to claim such a cultivated air. He begs your patience.

    POLL: Which La Traviata would you go see? Albina Shagimuratova, Dimitri Pittas & George Petean, or Georgia Jarman, Zach Borichevsky & Vladislav Sulimsky?

  21. #1812
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    3,793
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Nemorino View Post
    I'm merely a pretentious newb.
    Be as pretentious as you like. That's what we . . . *I* do here.

  22. Likes Povero Buoso, MAuer, Nemorino liked this post
  23. #1813
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Midwestern U.S.
    Posts
    2,695
    Post Thanks / Like
    Now this is exciting news: the Boston Symphony Orchestra will be performing the second act of Tristan und Isolde 12 April 2018 at Carnegie Hall, with Jonas Kaufmann and Camilla Nylund in the leads!
    https://www.carnegiehall.org/Calenda...ony-Orchestra/
    Der Jonas will also be appearing at this venue in a Lieder concert on 20 January 2018.
    https://www.carnegiehall.org/Calenda...aufmann-Tenor/

    (But why couldn’t it have been the second act of Fidelio? )

  24. #1814
    Senior Member Involved Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    135
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    Now this is exciting news: the Boston Symphony Orchestra will be performing the second act of Tristan und Isolde 12 April 2018 at Carnegie Hall, with Jonas Kaufmann and Camilla Nylund in the leads!
    https://www.carnegiehall.org/Calenda...ony-Orchestra/
    Der Jonas will also be appearing at this venue in a Lieder concert on 20 January 2018.
    https://www.carnegiehall.org/Calenda...aufmann-Tenor/

    (But why couldn’t it have been the second act of Fidelio? )
    And also, next season at Carnegie, the Bayerische Staatsoper is doing Rosenkavalier in concert!

    Adrianne Pieczonka, Feldmarschallin
    Angela Brower, Octavian
    Hanna-Elisabeth Müller, Sophie
    Peter Rose, Baron Ochs
    Markus Eiche, Faninal
    Lawrence Brownlee, Italian Singer

    I'm definitely going to see both!

  25. Likes Hoffmann, MAuer liked this post
  26. #1815
    Senior Member Veteran Member Povero Buoso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    510
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Nemorino View Post
    I'm merely a pretentious newb.
    My first confession is I like to think I know nothing on 99.8% of opera. I am entirely ignorant of the french side of things. Have poor knowledge of the German and while my knowledge of some of the Italian is workable there is more I would like to see than I have seen. I would say there is only one composer who I would feel comfortable discussing at any length and that would be Puccini (even then I would still feel uncomfortable discussing Edgar in detail as I have only seen or heard it once). The great thing about Opera though is that because there is so much of it if one wishes to explore solely one composer or another branch of opera (be that time period, country or artistic movement) that is as viable as trying to explore as much as possible (which I aim to do). Saying all of that I will in my opinion say that I think La Traviata is an excellent opera but always love some more variety especially with Verdi as he has some great operas that are underplayed by comparison that I consider if not quite equals at least interesting enough to warrant more play (as an example Luisa Miller which though not quite as strong is a great opera which is seen more seldom than it deserves)
    "Non sono in vena" Rodolfo summing up P.B's feelings on his dissertation.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


free html visitor counters
hit counter




Official Media Partners of Opera Carolina

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Opera Carolina

Official Media Partners of NC Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of North Carolina Opera

Official Media Partners of Greensboro Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Greensboro Opera

Official Media Partners of The A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute and Piedmont Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of The A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute
of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts and Piedmont Opera

Official Media Partners of Asheville Lyric Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Asheville Lyric Opera

Official Media Partners of UNC Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of UNC Opera
Dept. of Music, UNC-Chapel Hill College of Arts and Sciences

www.operalively.com

VISIT WWW.OPERALIVELY.COM FOR ALL YOUR OPERA NEEDS