Thread: Opera Small Talk

          
   
    Bookmark and Share
  1. #1921
    Senior Member Involved Member Nemorino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    127
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Dichteurehalle View Post
    * The last 2 times Iíve attended a Mozart opera, an older German lady has definitively declared ďThat didnít sound like Mozart!Ē though I did not understand what they were trying to say, either time.
    Well, she probably means it doesn't sound like her favorite 40-50 year old recordings of Mozart... If I'm being less cynical, I'll say maybe she's really familiar with "period performance practice" recordings. The Met's never gonna sound like that. (Unless they ever decide to partner with a baroque-specialising orchestra for a few productions (one can dream, right!))

    It's part of a common thread of inveterate 'complainers' that I encounter at the Opera (and the Met especially) that things don't sound (or look) as good as they used to be. Which may be half-true, but I think is more a symptom of listening over-and-over to these astounding, legendary recordings of the past which were peerless even in their own day. Set your expectations somewhere realistic!

    I am super excited for the Live in HD of this!

  2. Likes Hoffmann, Dichteurehalle liked this post
  3. #1922
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    5,479
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Dichteurehalle View Post
    This is a chat conversation I had at work just now:

    Me:
    Unsolicited youtube link for you

    Coworker:
    haha thanks
    peter mattei is quite handsome

    Me:
    yes!!
    I THINK SO TOO
    Funny, I don't find him handsome. Until he starts singing when I just melt.
    Natalie

  4. #1923
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    3,794
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    Funny, I don't find him handsome. Until he starts singing when I just melt.
    It's known as the Anti-Katherine-Jenkins effect.

  5. #1924
    Senior Member Involved Member Nemorino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    127
    Post Thanks / Like
    Sometimes when Iím watching an opera for the first time, Iíll study up a little: listening to it, reading synopses and articles. But other times, I watch them completely blind; if Iím familiar with the composer, and am sure itís going to be a mostly traditional production, it can be more fun not knowing whatís going to happen.

    Last weekend, I saw The Turn of the Screw at the Dallas Opera. Benjamin Britten is one of my super big faves from before I got into opera, so I decided to go in blind. Whoops! Big mistake! Itís not so much that I was confused, as that the story is intentionally vague and open to multiple interpretations. There are two ďghostsĒ in the story, which may be ghosts, or may be figments of the imagination of the young boy Miles (caused by an unnamed trauma). OR!... they might be figments of the imagination of a different character than you would naturally suspect!

    So, unfortunately for me, the opera itself didnít entirely click until I was driving home to Austin, when I listened to it again immediately. The score has all the trademark piquant harmonies & rhythms I love about Britten, and a really haunting aria (ďMaloĒ) for boy soprano. I just had too much to take in on my first viewing; I wish I could afford to drive back this weekend and see it again!

    This production from Glyndebourne is already on DVD, and Iíd highly recommend it. Itís a ďcinematicĒ libretto, with many quick scene changes; Jonathan Kentís production pulls these off in an imaginative way. It does not play up the Gothic horror aspect of the story, and thatís what I think kept me from fully engaging with my first viewing. But in its own way itís successful because it nudges the audience toward the psychological-realism interpretations of the opera.

  6. #1925
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    5,479
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Nemorino View Post
    Sometimes when I’m watching an opera for the first time, I’ll study up a little: listening to it, reading synopses and articles. But other times, I watch them completely blind; if I’m familiar with the composer, and am sure it’s going to be a mostly traditional production, it can be more fun not knowing what’s going to happen.

    Last weekend, I saw The Turn of the Screw at the Dallas Opera. Benjamin Britten is one of my super big faves from before I got into opera, so I decided to go in blind. Whoops! Big mistake! It’s not so much that I was confused, as that the story is intentionally vague and open to multiple interpretations. There are two “ghosts” in the story, which may be ghosts, or may be figments of the imagination of the young boy Miles (caused by an unnamed trauma). OR!... they might be figments of the imagination of a different character than you would naturally suspect!

    So, unfortunately for me, the opera itself didn’t entirely click until I was driving home to Austin, when I listened to it again immediately. The score has all the trademark piquant harmonies & rhythms I love about Britten, and a really haunting aria (“Malo”) for boy soprano. I just had too much to take in on my first viewing; I wish I could afford to drive back this weekend and see it again!

    This production from Glyndebourne is already on DVD, and I’d highly recommend it. It’s a “cinematic” libretto, with many quick scene changes; Jonathan Kent’s production pulls these off in an imaginative way. It does not play up the Gothic horror aspect of the story, and that’s what I think kept me from fully engaging with my first viewing. But in its own way it’s successful because it nudges the audience toward the psychological-realism interpretations of the opera.
    A fantastic opera and yes the Glyndebourne production is excellent; so is this film version:



    Natalie

  7. Likes Festat, Dichteurehalle, Nemorino liked this post
  8. #1926
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Festat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    S„o Paulo
    Posts
    1,194
    Post Thanks / Like
    I also love The Turn of the Screw but I think that the opera is harshly divided in two. The first half has me on the edge of my seat. Everything is sinister and somber and awfully instigating until you realize that, yes, the ghosts do exist. Then the suspense is off, it turns into something else that is, albeit still creepily intimate, less successful and maybe a bit too tangible.

    The problems of adaptation...

  9. Likes Ann Lander (sospiro), MAuer, Nemorino liked this post
  10. #1927
    Senior Member Involved Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    136
    Post Thanks / Like
    I quite enjoyed this snippet of a Muti talk on Toscanini.


  11. Likes MAuer liked this post
  12. #1928
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,625
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Dichteurehalle View Post
    I quite enjoyed this snippet of a Muti talk on Toscanini.

    Brilliant!! Thank you.

  13. Likes Dichteurehalle liked this post
  14. #1929
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    9,305
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Ann Lander (sospiro) View Post
    Brilliant!! Thank you.
    Exactly! Spot on! I love Maestro Muti!
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  15. #1930
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    5,479
    Post Thanks / Like
    I love Muti so much. He is so funny! And spot on.

    Personally I couldn't care less about the money notes as long as the whole phrase is well sung and makes sense.
    Natalie

  16. #1931
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,625
    Post Thanks / Like
    It was Samuel Ramey's birthday yesterday (28 March 1942) and to celebrate one of my FB friends posted this clip. I've never heard of this composer and I think this piece is wonderful.


  17. Likes Dichteurehalle, Hoffmann, MAuer liked this post
  18. #1932
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    9,305
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    I love Muti so much. He is so funny! And spot on.

    Personally I couldn't care less about the money notes as long as the whole phrase is well sung and makes sense.
    Yes, yesterday I was watching clips of "A Te, O Cara" to verify what Muti was saying, and it is pretty striking. There is one with Pavarotti and Joan Sutherland where Pav does exactly what Muti is complaining of, in spite of it being still very beautiful due to Pavarotti's sublime timbre of voice. Then there is one with JDF and Nino Machaidze where JDF while not having a timbre as beautiful as Pav's, does sing it more melodiously and elegantly, more flowing belcanto than heavy Italianate drama. Nino is simply spectacular in that clip and given that I'm not crazy about Sutherland, I enjoyed a lot more Nino's beautiful face and perfectly sustained notes.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  19. #1933
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    9,305
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Ann Lander (sospiro) View Post
    I've never heard of this composer and I think this piece is wonderful.
    Carlisle Floyd, major American opera composer. Still alive. Susannah is his best effort, but he has many others that are pretty good too, like Wuthering Heights, Of Mice and Men, Cold Sassy Tree. Just one year ago in March 2016 he premiered a new one, Prince of Players, which I don't know.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  20. Likes MAuer, Ann Lander (sospiro) liked this post
  21. #1934
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Midwestern U.S.
    Posts
    2,697
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Ann Lander (sospiro) View Post
    It was Samuel Ramey's birthday yesterday (28 March 1942) and to celebrate one of my FB friends posted this clip. I've never heard of this composer and I think this piece is wonderful.

    Love that gorgeous, rich bass!!

  22. Likes Ann Lander (sospiro) liked this post
  23. #1935
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,625
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    Love that gorgeous, rich bass!!
    And me!

    His range is incredible.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


free html visitor counters
hit counter




Official Media Partners of Opera Carolina

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Opera Carolina

Official Media Partners of NC Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of North Carolina Opera

Official Media Partners of Greensboro Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Greensboro Opera

Official Media Partners of The A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute and Piedmont Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of The A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute
of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts and Piedmont Opera

Official Media Partners of Asheville Lyric Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Asheville Lyric Opera

Official Media Partners of UNC Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of UNC Opera
Dept. of Music, UNC-Chapel Hill College of Arts and Sciences

www.operalively.com

VISIT WWW.OPERALIVELY.COM FOR ALL YOUR OPERA NEEDS