Thread: Opera Small Talk

          
   
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  1. #1351
    Senior Member Involved Member Floria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sospiro View Post
    Work is difficult at the moment. There has been a huge increase in the number of cases and we are also one man short as a colleague has succumbed and has now been off work for six weeks with anxiety and stress.

    She is currently undergoing some cbt which she is finding helpful. Yesterday she asked me how many open cases there were and I just said 'Lots, but if the kids started behaving themselves, we'd be out of a job'. She laughed and asked if I'd been having some cbt and I said 'yes, provided by the Royal Opera House, (I'd just been to see Król Roger), bit expensive but it really works!'

    With that in mind, I really enjoyed this article about Chicago Bulls' Pau Gasol.
    I know where you are coming from. I just went through a month of insanity. Blasting Callas's 'E che Io son Medea' helped.

    Hang in there. I hope things get better.

    Thanks for that link, I loved it.

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  3. #1352
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Floria View Post
    I know where you are coming from. I just went through a month of insanity. Blasting Callas's 'E che Io son Medea' helped.

    Hang in there. I hope things get better.

    Thanks for that link, I loved it.
    Hope things get better for you, too.
    "The world calls them its singers and poets and artists and storytellers; but they are just people who have never forgotten the way to fairyland."
    Lucy Maud Montgomery

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  5. #1353
    Senior Member Involved Member Floria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sospiro View Post
    Hope things get better for you, too.
    Things have improved, thanks.

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  7. #1354
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    This kind of falls under the category of "very small talk", but I read this morning that a lock of Mozart's hair way out-sold a lock of Beethoven's hair at auction in London. I guess Mozart's 22 operas trumped the one (superb) opera of Beethoven...


    http://www.nbcnews.com/business/busi...figaro-n366596

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  9. #1355
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoffmann View Post
    This kind of falls under the category of "very small talk", but I read this morning that a lock of Mozart's hair way out-sold a lock of Beethoven's hair at auction in London. I guess Mozart's 22 operas trumped the one (superb) opera of Beethoven...


    http://www.nbcnews.com/business/busi...figaro-n366596
    he's been burned. There's no way enough hair there to make a proper rug.

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  11. #1356
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Two weird questions just popped into my head about the world of opera, so I thought I would ask:

    1) Are there any a cappella operas?

    2) Are there any wordless operas (pantomime perhaps)?

    In either case, if there are, please list some. Who knows, they might be fun.
    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

  12. #1357
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Florestan View Post
    Two weird questions just popped into my head about the world of opera, so I thought I would ask:

    1) Are there any a cappella operas?

    2) Are there any wordless operas (pantomime perhaps)?

    In either case, if there are, please list some. Who knows, they might be fun.

    In the case of an a cappella opera, probably not, and, unless Samuel Beckett also was a librettist, and Breath an opera, I don't think so in the second case, either. But then, wordless would likely defeat the purpose.

    However, I defer to Luiz' greater knowledge to answer your question.

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    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    I didn't know Midsummer Night's Dream was an opera or else these folks made it into an opera:

    http://www.operaacappella.com/


    Another a cappella opera discussed here.
    Necessities of life: food, water, air, shelter, and opera.

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  16. #1359
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Well, Britten has composed the opera A Midsummer Night's Dream, in 1960. It's not this one, though. This one is a new piece.
    Ambroise Thomas composed the much older Le Songe d'Une Nuit d'Été, in 1850, but it is actually not based on Shakespeare's play although Shakespeare is one of the characters in the opera.
    The contemporary pasticcio done over Baroque music, The Enchanted Island (2011) is based on both A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Tempest.
    Another opera based on it is Puck (1941) by Marcel Delannoy.

    So, this one is the fifth operatic adaptation of Shakespeare's play, as far as I know (unless we also count the Rock Opera made of it). Of course, the play has also originated some three different ballets and an overture by Mendelssohn, later completed by more incidental music that has been extensively used in stage productions of the play. Orff also wrote incidental music for the play. Henze's Eight Symphony is based on it, as well.

    A Midsummer Night's Dream has a rich musical history, indeed.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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  18. #1360
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    Well, Britten has composed the opera A Midsummer Night's Dream, in 1960. It's not this one, though. This one is a new piece.
    Ambroise Thomas composed the much older Le Songe d'Une Nuit d'Été, in 1850, but it is actually not based on Shakespeare's play although Shakespeare is one of the characters in the opera.
    The contemporary pasticcio done over Baroque music, The Enchanted Island (2011) is based on both A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Tempest.
    Another opera based on it is Puck (1941) by Marcel Delannoy.

    So, this one is the fifth operatic adaptation of Shakespeare's play, as far as I know (unless we also count the Rock Opera made of it). Of course, the play has also originated some three different ballets and an overture by Mendelssohn, later completed by more incidental music that has been extensively used in stage productions of the play. Orff also wrote incidental music for the play. Henze's Eight Symphony is based on it, as well.

    A Midsummer Night's Dream has a rich musical history, indeed.
    Purcell's the Fairy Queen is another version.
    Natalie

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  20. #1361
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    Weber's Oberon, as the title indicates, also borrows a couple of Shakespeare's characters for its plot, though the central story with the French knight Sir Huon and the Caliph's daughter Reiza have nothing to do with Will's play.

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  22. #1362
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    Purcell's the Fairy Queen is another version.
    Yep, I forgot about this one.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  23. #1363
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    Weber's Oberon, as the title indicates, also borrows a couple of Shakespeare's characters for its plot, though the central story with the French knight Sir Huon and the Caliph's daughter Reiza have nothing to do with Will's play.
    I wouldn't count this one. The opera is based on the German poem Oberon by Wieland, which was based on the French medieval tale Huon de Bordeaux. Sure, Oberon, the King of the Fairies, was also in Shakespeare's play (and so was Puck) but merely sharing characters that exist in legend and mythology shouldn't be taken as an adaptation of the play. I did include Thomas' opera in my list and it is also not a true adaptation of the play, but picking the same title and putting Shakespeare himself as a character does indicate at least inspiration and acknowledgment, while Weber's opera has virtually nothing to do with Shakespeare's play except for making reference to the same existing legend/mythology figures. I mean, if Shakespeare's play had never existed, Weber would still have made the same opera, while Thomas clearly makes reference to The Bard. The other ones listed are clear adaptations of the play.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  24. #1364
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Did anyone watch the BBC Cardiff singer of the world finals last night?

    I thought all the finalists were fanstastic and I liked all their songs even if they weren't perfect.

    Particularly I was very excited by the winner Nadine Koutcher (I'm sure I heard Te Kanawa announce her as Miss Belarus) singing Marfa's aria from The Tsar's Bride. I thought that was the winner at that time.

    Did you have a different favourite?

  25. #1365
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    Did anyone watch the BBC Cardiff singer of the world finals last night?

    I thought all the finalists were fanstastic and I liked all their songs even if they weren't perfect.

    Particularly I was very excited by the winner Nadine Koutcher (I'm sure I heard Te Kanawa announce her as Miss Belarus) singing Marfa's aria from The Tsar's Bride. I thought that was the winner at that time.

    Did you have a different favourite?
    Ummm, I could be mistaken, but don't believe this was broadcast in the U.S. unless it was over a channel on SiriusXM that I'm not aware of.

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