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Thread: What is opera? For kids!

          
   
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  1. #1
    treemaker
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    What is opera? For kids!

    I haven't seen these posted elsewhere. Bugs Bunny brought opera to a younger set, and their parents. I will post the one youtube here, and you realize there are more to be had.

    Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd do Wagner

  2. #2
    treemaker
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    I played violin in high school orchestra. We did the Rossini overture, and my teacher made sure we saw this.

    The Rabbit of Seville

  3. #3
    treemaker
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    I'm hoping that, as we define what opera is, or even what Opera Lively is, that somewhere in that definition, some plank on the party platform, needs to be us as opera enthusiasts reaching out to those younger than ourselves. Whether it be through cartoons, or whatever. Maybe this thread can be discussion of those goals.

    Here is a link: Seattle Opera has the "Bravo Club" as a way to attract people aged 21 through 39. Club members get reduced price tickets and invitations to regularly scheduled parties. I'm told it is very successful.

    Scott

  4. #4
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Opera Carolina has exactly the same thing. And coincidentally, it's also called Bravo. They offer 20% discount on tickets, blocks of seats so that members sit together, and parties. Maybe Opera Carolina did it inspired by Seattle, or maybe there are other companies that do this.

    About the Opera for Kids thing - nice, for us parents to reflect on it. However, our Terms of Service prohibit members younger than 13, so, it's not likely that kids will get to see this. Although, of course, we can't check visitors' ages. But I find it unlikely that young kids will ever bump into our site. But one never knows, we do have a 13-year-old member.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  5. #5
    treemaker
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    I'm not trying to recruit kids to the forum. I agree...13 is a good age limit.

    I hadn't seen these cartoons for a while, so I wanted to see them and share them. And maybe it will lead to other discussions.

    My friend-who-I-hope-will-join Norm works with middle schools to get kids and their parents to the dress rehearsals of the Seattle Opera. He goes into the schools and gives lectures, and then arranges for everyone to meet at the opera hall.

    Elsewhere on this forum, someone posted the Met Opera outreach program into the elementary schools to teach the kids the Verdi "Anvil Chorus", in the original Italian. I think that's great.

    Whatever works.

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  7. #6
    Member Member Elena House's Avatar
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    Speaking of our 13 year old member...I had a lot of fun watching the "cartoon Opera". Thanks Treemaker. I showed it to my father because I have never seen Bugs Bunny. He said "I am sorry Elena. I have failed you". hehe. I loved it when they repeated the word "sword and Magic helmet" over and over like they do in real operas (I can't remember what that repeating is called... help please).

    I have noticed recently that there is a program at the Atlanta Opera named "OPERA IN YOUR SCHOOL" with some pretty interesting offerings for the public schools. http://atlantaopera.org/education/operainschool.aspx I'm home schooled but I get to go to the opera a lot anyway.

    I think it would be great if some of the kids I talk with could respond to my bringing up the topic of Opera with something besides crossed eyes. Then again, I get that from a lot of the adults too.

    When I brought my best friend with me to see Puccini's Turandot back in 2007, with a huge gold dragon on the stage, it made such an impression on her that she will still bring it up today. Unfortunately her parents have never brought her to another opera and she moved to California so I can't bring her again.

  8. #7
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    I posted some nice opera animation, Elena. Check it out:

    http://operalively.com/forums/showth...pera-Animation
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  9. #8
    Senior Member Involved Member Tardis's Avatar
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    Treemaker's comment about the "Bravo Club" is really interesting to me because I recently finished Joe Volpe's memoir, The Toughest Show on Earth, on his time at the Met.
    Near the end of the book, he talks about some of the challenges that the opera world faces in the 21st century. Regarding young professionals and the average age of opera goers, he didn't seem particularly concerned about them. In brief, Volpe seemed to think that with young professionals and college students, that they simply didn't have the time to go to operas because this was the period of time in their lives where they were busy establishing their careers and raising a family. Volpe thought that the high average age of opera goers was more a symptom of older opera enthusiasts having more free time than younger ones.
    I wonder if that's part of the reason that the Met doesn't seem to have as advanced a program as Seattle. Under Volpe's leadership, it simply wasn't a priority for them. After all, the Met were getting around 88%-95% attendance before 2001.
    The Met does have a Young Associates Program, but the entry fee is $600, compared to Seattle's $65.

    Individual opera houses seem to run their own programs towards attracting young professionals and students. But reading Opera America's Strategic Plan 2010-2015, I am curious to see whether there is a concerted effort by America's opera organizations to increase overall opera awareness and knowledge among high school, college, and graduate students. Everyone just seems to be running around doing their own thing.


    Quote Originally Posted by treemaker View Post
    I'm hoping that, as we define what opera is, or even what Opera Lively is, that somewhere in that definition, some plank on the party platform, needs to be us as opera enthusiasts reaching out to those younger than ourselves. Whether it be through cartoons, or whatever. Maybe this thread can be discussion of those goals.

    Here is a link: Seattle Opera has the "Bravo Club" as a way to attract people aged 21 through 39. Club members get reduced price tickets and invitations to regularly scheduled parties. I'm told it is very successful.

    Scott

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