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Schigolch
January 11th, 2013, 07:35 PM
Looking beyond Opera, and including all genres, who are our ten favorite composers?.

This is my list:

Johann Sebastian Bach
Olivier Messiaen
Benjamin Britten
Giuseppe Verdi
Claude Debussy
Alban Berg
Salvatore Sciarrino
Vincenzo Bellini
Erich Wolfgang Korngold
Steve Reich

Aramis
January 11th, 2013, 08:21 PM
This is my list:

Johann Sebastian Bach
Olivier Messiaen
Benjamin Britten
Giuseppe Verdi
Claude Debussy
Alban Berg
Salvatore Sciarrino
Vincenzo Bellini
Erich Wolfgang Korngold
Steve Reich

YOUR list? And what claims on it do you have? I might just as well write this list myself right now and how do you think you could prove that it's YOUR list, not MINE list? Possession is illusion... the truth is delusion... Return to Forever plays fusion...

Amfortas
January 11th, 2013, 10:47 PM
This is not MY list. It belongs to the world:

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Ludwig van Beethoven
Richard Wagner
Giuseppe Verdi
Johannes Brahms
Gustav Mahler
Anton Bruckner
Richard Strauss
Sergei Rachmaninov
Sergei Prokofiev

HarpsichordConcerto
January 11th, 2013, 10:53 PM
YOUR list? And what claims on it do you have? I might just as well write this list myself right now and how do you think you could prove that it's YOUR list, not MINE list? Possession is illusion... the truth is delusion... Return to Forever plays fusion...

Young geezer Anne, Schigolch meant to say those names are his top ten personal favourites, and the collection of top ten favourites in this thread when we post ours then becomes collectively our top ten favourite.

Here is my list:-
John Cage
Iannis Xennakis
Karlheinz Stock....ooops wait a minute, my top ten favourite, well OK. Not in any particular order:

George Frideric Handel
Johann Sebastian Bach
Johann Christian Bach
Franz Joseph Haydn
Michael Haydn
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Ludvig van Beethoven
Felix Mendelssohn
Franz Schubert
Giuseppe Verdi

AnaMendoza
January 12th, 2013, 06:16 AM
Young geezer Anne, Schigolch meant to say those names are his top ten personal favourites, and the collection of top ten favourites in this thread when we post ours then becomes collectively our top ten favourite.

Here is my list:-
John Cage
Iannis Xennakis
Karlheinz Stock....ooops wait a minute, my top ten favourite, well OK. Not in any particular order:



Was that a little list you were starting to make? ;)

Nervous Gentleman
January 12th, 2013, 07:33 AM
Looking beyond Opera, and including all genres, who are our ten favorite composers?

Yikes! That's a difficult proposition. It should be affirmed, though, that "favorite" does not necessarily equate to whom each of considers to be "the best"; rather, those whom we count among our personal favorites.

Well, in my case (as I am sure it is with most of us who continue to discover composers with whom we were not previously familiar) the list is ever shifting.

Also, I take it that this list is confined to what is termed "classical" or "art music" (or any of a number of other unsatisfactory variations), excluding "popular music," jazz, etc.

Off the top of my head I would say (in no particular order):

Johann Sebastian Bach (a tour of the many places in Thüringen in which Bach resided is highly recommended, followed by Leipzig)
George Frideric Handel (I also recommend visiting Händel-Haus in Halle)
Franz Schubert
Gaetano Donizetti
Anton Rubinstein
Hector Berlioz
Leoš Janáček
Anton Webern
Sergei Prokofiev
Dmitri Shostakovich
Sofia Gubaidulina

Ok, eleven... Amfortas reminded me of Prokofiev. From the time that I first heard "Peter and the Wolf" and later was mesmerized by "Alexander Nevsky," my life would have been considerably poorer without Prokofiev.

HarpsichordConcerto
January 12th, 2013, 07:40 AM
Yikes! That's a difficult proposition. It should be affirmed, though, that "favorite" does not necessarily equate to whom each of considers to be "the best"; rather, those whom we count among our personal favorites.

Well, in my case (as I am sure it is with most of us who continue to discover composers with whom we were not previously familiar) the list is ever shifting.

Also, I take it that this list is confined to what is termed "classical" or "art music" (or any of a number of other unsatisfactory variations), excluding "popular music," jazz, etc.

Off the top of my head I would say (in no particular order):

Johann Sebastian Bach (a tour of the many places in Thüringen in which Bach resided is highly recommended, followed by Leipzig)
George Frideric Handel (I also recommend visiting Händel-Haus in Halle)
Franz Schubert
Gaetano Donizetti
Anton Rubinstein
Hector Berlioz
Leoš Janáček
Anton Webern
Dmitri Shostakovich
Sofia Gubaidulina

Sofia Gubaidulina - that good, uh? I don't know her pieces, not even introductory level and the segments of a few I have heard were very difficult on my ears. SG is an unusual name mixed in with your top ten list. Which piece(s) might you recommend me to begin with?

Nervous Gentleman
January 12th, 2013, 07:51 AM
Which piece(s) might you recommend me to begin with?

Oh, please don't put me in that position. :scared2: I don't want to recommend something that you may end up hating!

HarpsichordConcerto
January 12th, 2013, 10:30 AM
Oh, please don't put me in that position. :scared2: I don't want to recommend something that you may end up hating!

Don't worry. I know Gubaidulina is a modernist composer.

This was enjoyable.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_D2H47jhNQ

Schigolch
January 12th, 2013, 04:10 PM
Sofia Gubaidulina is great. She has an incredible fantasy, and an uncanny ability to use the timbre of the different instruments.

This is one of her more notorious pieces:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9PpmlBmVns

Personally, I've always liked better Galina Ustvolskaya, though:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0LWwbLhfr0

emiellucifuge
January 12th, 2013, 04:36 PM
Wagner
Dvorak
Bach JS
Handel
Rachmaninov
Puccini
Schubert
Schoenberg
Ravel
BA Zimmermann

HarpsichordConcerto
January 12th, 2013, 11:24 PM
Sofia Gubaidulina is great. She has an incredible fantasy, and an uncanny ability to use the timbre of the different instruments.

This is one of her more notorious pieces:



It sounded alright after the introduction. But no way as notorious/extreme as this piece, which I found totally horrible.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RDg8miytz4

Schigolch
January 13th, 2013, 11:10 AM
Well, the treatment of the String Quartet is one of the great stories (maybe *the* great story) in the development of chamber music from the 18th century to our own days, in my view. I will try to open a thread about it, so we can discuss this fascinating subject. Or maybe other member can do it.

I find Gubaidulina's piece above quite interesting and an aural challenge. I'm all for extended techniques, and hers are not even among the most extremes. But it's a nice example of how she can manipulate timbres to build the Quartet on the acoustic nature of the sound, rather than in the usual and well-tested tecniques from the past.

This is the last String Quartet (number six) by Brian Ferneyhough:

[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

that could be considered as using a "similar" approach, but that with the other five are among the most important canons of String Quartets in classical music.

Then again, I'm aware many people won't like Gubaidulina's approach (or Ferneyhough's), and will be rather disappointed with the result. But that's fine, as I always say it's impossible that everyone loves everything. :tiphat:

Amfortas
January 13th, 2013, 11:56 AM
But that's fine, as I always say it's impossible that everyone loves everything. :tiphat:

Not so fast there. There's still hope, and all of you can help in the great cause.

Please contribute your ideas to my new thread, "How Can We Make It So That Everyone Loves Everything?" (http://operalively.com/forums/showthread.php/1460-Our-Top-Ten-Favorite-Composers?p=23870#post23870)

Dins
January 14th, 2013, 10:41 AM
In particular order:

Johan Sebastian Bach (He seems to be on almost everyone's list)
Antonio Vivaldi
Lovely Lovely Ludwig van (Beethoven)
Arvo Pärt
Gioachino Rossini
Carl Orff
Gustaf Holst
Hendryk Gorecki
George Frideric Händel
Modest Mussorgsky

BandoRGCG
February 1st, 2013, 08:57 AM
These are some of my favorite composers -
Beethoven
Chopin
Verdi
Puccini
Mozart
Tchaikovsky
Bach
Schubert
Brahms
Rachmaninov
I play piano in spare time so this list is probably weighted towards piano, although these composers are also orchestral (and opera). Hard to make a list like this, since on a different day, might prefer some other composers on the list.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
February 2nd, 2013, 01:01 AM
These are some of my favorite composers -
Beethoven
Chopin
Verdi
Puccini
Mozart
Tchaikovsky
Bach
Schubert
Brahms
Rachmaninov
I play piano in spare time so this list is probably weighted towards piano, although these composers are also orchestral (and opera). Hard to make a list like this, since on a different day, might prefer some other composers on the list.

Welcome to Opera Lively, BandoRGCG.

My interest for non-operatic classical music, although existing, is greatly dwarfed by my interest for opera, so, I'd tend to only quote opera composers in my list.

It would be something like this (the order matters):

1. Wagner
2. Verdi
3. Mozart
4. Handel
5. Berlioz
6. Beethoven
7. Rossini
8. Richard Strauss
9. Puccini
10. Donizetti

I'd have to say that the only exception to the "opera composer" rule in my top 10 list is Beethoven, because I'm not listing him as my 6th favorite composer for the sake of his only opera Fidelio (which I like a lot, but is only one), but rather because of his symphonies, sonatas, etc. Even if he hadn't composed Fidelio I'd still list him there. No other non-operatic composer, however, would be able to break into my top 10. Bach, for instance, is really not for me. I know it may sound like heresy, and it is weird because I profoundly love Baroque opera - but I actually can barely stand non-operatic Baroque music. People like Chopin and Mahler would get close to breaking into the top ten but not quite (probably more like top 20), and if I allowed Vivaldi there, although I do like his non-operatic output, his getting in would have to include his operatic output which I'm getting to know and liking more and more, so, he wouldn't be a true breaker of the rule. Tchaikovsky is the same case - I do like his non-operatic works but equally value his operas. So, only Beethoven for non-operatic music... and the other spots, for me, are opera - opera - opera.

Tardis
February 14th, 2013, 10:27 PM
I completely agree with you. I don't know why. I respect Bach but his music doesn't really strike an emotional chord with me like the later Classical and Romantic composers do. I will keep trying.
I think if Bach was born in a later time period, and had the opportunity to really express himself more without the musical conventions at the time, my own views on him would be much different.

It probably has more to do with personal sensibilities than anything else.
It's kind of like Feynman vs. Schwinger. They are both geniuses but with very different approaches.
I appreciate Schwinger's mathematical precision but I love Feynman's intuition more.





Welcome to Opera Lively, BandoRGCG.

I'd have to say that the only exception to the "opera composer" rule in my top 10 list is Beethoven, because I'm not listing him as my 6th favorite composer for the sake of his only opera Fidelio (which I like a lot, but is only one), but rather because of his symphonies, sonatas, etc. Even if he hadn't composed Fidelio I'd still list him there. No other non-operatic composer, however, would be able to break into my top 10. Bach, for instance, is really not for me. I know it may sound like heresy, and it is weird because I profoundly love Baroque opera - but I actually can barely stand non-operatic Baroque music. People like Chopin and Mahler would get close to breaking into the top ten but not quite (probably more like top 20), and if I allowed Vivaldi there, although I do like his non-operatic output, his getting in would have to include his operatic output which I'm getting to know and liking more and more, so, he wouldn't be a true breaker of the rule. Tchaikovsky is the same case - I do like his non-operatic works but equally value his operas. So, only Beethoven for non-operatic music... and the other spots, for me, are opera - opera - opera.

Schigolch
February 14th, 2013, 10:43 PM
The "musical conventions" of the 18th century didn't prevent Bach from fully "expressing" in his music wathever was in his mind. http://www.millerfilm.com/spacelinks/wink_emoticon.bmp

Sometimes (well, quite a few times, really) I keep being surprised by how alive and kicking is still Romanticism after so many, many years.

Baroque music, or Classical music afterwards, was not limited in any way by any kind of musical 'blocks' that needed other techniques to liberate torrents of passion and the capacity to pour emotion into the scores. It's really a question of mindset.

For sure, one can enjoy or not Bach's music, like that of any other composer. But there were not real technical limitations to constraint his genius. :)

BandoRGCG
February 18th, 2013, 07:17 PM
I have been extremely impressed by the genius of Bach in being able to place voices next to each other, especially in fugues. Although my knowledge of theory is very lacking, I can hear that the music to me is pretty unbelievable. I had a conversation the other day with a musician (composer) who indicated that in his musical training that a major assignment was to separate each voice from the Preludes & Fugues into separate pieces (so four voices would be four musical compositions) and then memorize them. ( I can't even imagine). I sometimes wonder if Bach were alive today, would he be a mathematician or an astrophysicist. Even though I don't know the theory, I find that there is much emotion there, which reminds me of a popular album I think from the 1970's, "Switched on Bach" which was played on radio quite often. Last thought on this is that Romantic composers could be quite contrapuntal. I play piano in spare time and there is so much Chopin where he is constantly putting themes within chords seemingly out of nowhere (one reason I always loved Vladimir Horowitz who was ingenious at bringing out these melodies. Anyway, just some random thoughts and enjoyed the above posts.

Amfortas
February 18th, 2013, 07:31 PM
Welcome to the forum, BandoRGCG!

BandoRGCG
February 18th, 2013, 10:00 PM
Thanks, for welcome

StLukesGuildOhio
November 10th, 2013, 03:33 AM
1. J.S. Bach
2. W.A. Mozart
3. L.v. Beethoven
4. Joseph Haydn
5. Franz Schubert
6. Richard Wagner
7. Richard Strauss
8. Gustav Mahler
9. Johannes Brahms
10. Gabriel Faure (one non-German!)

11. G.F. Handel (probably should be no. 10... but then...)
12. Piotr Tchaikovsky
13. Claude Debussy
14. Maurice Ravel
15. Hector Berlioz
16. Robert Schumann
17. Antonio Vivaldi
18. Franz Liszt
19. Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber
20. Frederic Chopin

21. Giacomo Puccini
22. Christoph Willibald Gluck
23. Gioachino Rossini
24. Jules Massenet
25. Jacques Offenbach
26. Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
27. Giuseppe Verdi
28. Gaetano Donizetti
29. Guillaume Dufay
30. Claudio Monteverdi/Jean-Philippe Rameau/Carlo Gesualdo/Johann Strauss II

The first 15 are pretty much set in stone... although those lower down may shift up or down one or two places depending on when I am asked. The remaining 15 would always remain in my top 50... but may shift around quite a bit.

Florestan
November 19th, 2017, 03:09 AM
No particular order:

Beethoven
Mendelssohn
Mahler
Rachmaninoff
Saint-Saens
Handel
Wagner
Donizetti
Bellini
Rossini

Soave_Fanciulla
November 19th, 2017, 05:08 AM
Handel
Britten
Tchaikovsky
Monteverdi
Wagner
Mozart
Rossini
Vivaldi
Rameau
Rachmaninov… or Rimsky Korsakov…. or just Russians. I love Russian opera.

I also like Verdi and Puccini but don’t listen much to their operas these days.

Nemorino
November 19th, 2017, 07:20 PM
Beethoven
Stravinsky
Prokofiev
Britten
Shostakovich
Wagner
Verdi
Adams
Handel
Tchaikovsky

In my pre-opera symphony-crazed days, Dvorak and Mahler would have been on there, but Verdi and Handel have taken their place (and Rossini is probably #11).

Sonata
December 7th, 2017, 12:21 AM
1) Verdi
2) Brahms
3) Mozart
4) Dvorak
5) Mendelssohn
6) Chopin
7) Ravel
8) Charpentier
9) Haydn
10) R.Strauss

Mahler is hard to leave out, the fact is I love his music but don't listen to him much. I treat listening as a special occasion that I sometimes forget to have that occasion. I could see him taking Haydn or Strauss' spot if I get into my next Mahler kick

Soave_Fanciulla
December 9th, 2017, 06:20 PM
1) Verdi
2) Brahms
3) Mozart
4) Dvorak
5) Mendelssohn
6) Chopin
7) Ravel
8) Charpentier
9) Haydn
10) R.Strauss

Mahler is hard to leave out, the fact is I love his music but don't listen to him much. I treat listening as a special occasion that I sometimes forget to have that occasion. I could see him taking Haydn or Strauss' spot if I get into my next Mahler kick

Mahler was my favourite composer before I started getting obsessed with opera. I still listen sometimes to the vocal parts of his symphonies, and his songs.

Sonata
December 22nd, 2017, 12:46 AM
1) Verdi
2) Brahms
3) Mozart
4) Dvorak
5) Mendelssohn
6) Chopin
7) Ravel
8) Charpentier
9) Haydn
10) R.Strauss

Mahler is hard to leave out, the fact is I love his music but don't listen to him much. I treat listening as a special occasion that I sometimes forget to have that occasion. I could see him taking Haydn or Strauss' spot if I get into my next Mahler kick

I'm on a Bruckner kick right now and this man's music is really speaking to me. I love the grandeur, I can happily lose myself in a Bruckner symphony. Almost meditative.

I think he would take Haydn's place much as I'd hate to bump him out

Sonata
December 22nd, 2017, 01:11 AM
1) Verdi
2) Brahms
3) Mozart
4) Dvorak
5) Chopin
6)Ravel
7) Bruckner
8) Mendellsohn
9)Charpentier
10) R.Strauss

Here is my updated list with Bruckner