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Clayton
September 11th, 2014, 03:59 PM
A is for Anfossi

Pasquale Anfossi (1727-1797) was an Italian opera composer of the Metastasio period composing between sixty and seventy operas who also wrote several sacred pieces. He worked in Rome, Venice, Paris and London after studying composition under Sacchini and Piccinni.
Amongst his works was his successful La Finta Giardiniera, which premiered at Rome's Teatro delle Dame during the 1774 carnival, the year before Mozart wrote his version. This opera was recently produced by Westdeutscher Rundfunk, directed by Werner Ehrhardt and released by Sony Music.

...

Okay, this might have been done many times before but not in my OL lifetime.

Post anything; interesting or funny just to put a smile on a readers face but something (vaguely) to do with opera.

Start post with "A is for..." and once we have exhasuted that (perhaps if no one has posted for a couple of days), we'll move on to the next letter.

Of course expansion on previous posts or correction or just discussion also welcome (so these posts do not start with "A is for..."

This thread is titled "community" guide, so please post! Don't let me play all by myself (it will be like I'm back at school); post anything!

Clayton
September 11th, 2014, 04:04 PM
A is for A-B-A

The wrong way to start the alphabet.

Clayton
September 11th, 2014, 04:10 PM
A is for A-B-A

The wrong way to start the alphabet.

It is also a common representation for Da Capo aria, where the first section (A) is repeated after the second section (B), where the singer would add their expression on the repeat. It is a character of the operas of the baroque period.

...

Okay, do we get the gist?

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 11th, 2014, 07:11 PM
A is for Aida, an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Antonio Ghislanzoni.

Some older people's first experience of opera was seeing a film made with Sophia Loren (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0045483/fullcredits?ref_=tt_ov_st_sm) acting the role of Aida. :confused:

http://d1oi7t5trwfj5d.cloudfront.net/f3/8b1cb013a811e2b9e522000a1d0930/file/aida_poster.jpg

That's enough trauma for one day.

Soave_Fanciulla
September 11th, 2014, 10:54 PM
A is for Alagna, quite a divo in his own right:

Likes sopranos:

http://assets7.classicfm.com/2011/38/angela-gheorghiu--roberto-alagna8-1316790624-view-1.jpg
http://www.enational.ro/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/roberto-aleksandra-2.jpg


Does not like being booed


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxyBxbGF-Qg


A fine singer-cook


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8IuXZ4L6JQ

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 11th, 2014, 11:20 PM
A is for Anna Netrebko, of course! :heart1: How could you guys think of anybody else??? :dejection:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4f/Anna_Netrebko_-_Romy_2013_a.jpg

Amfortas
September 11th, 2014, 11:33 PM
A is for Amfortas, the most complex, compelling, and diabolically handsome figure in the operatic universe.

Oh, he's also a character in some Wagner thing or other, too.

MAuer
September 12th, 2014, 01:09 PM
A is for Azucena, the gypsy whose quest for revenge against the di Luna family drives the plot of Verdi's Il Trovatore. Azucena's mother had been caught bending over the cradle of one of the old Count di Luna's sons, and when the infant became ill, it was assumed the old lady had bewitched him and, in keeping with ideas of justice at the time, she was burned at the stake. While this was happening, her daughter snatched the Count's brat, planning to toss him in the fire, but got a little mixed up and flung her own kid in the flames instead.
All of this preceded the opera's events, in which the current Count di Luna is engaged in a romantic rivalry with a troubadour named Manrico for the favors of one of the Queen of Spain's ladies-in-waiting named Leonora. The Count is also determined to find the gypsy who cremated his baby brother and settle the score with her. As we soon realize, Manrico is none other than Garcia di Luna, the Count's brother, whom Azucena raised in place of her own child. Eventually, both Manrico and his mother are captured by the Count's soldiers. Leonora tries to save her lover's life by offering herself to di Luna, but sneaks a little sip of poison afterward so that she won't actually have to fulfill her promise. She dies before the Count can have any fun, and in a fit of pique, he sends Manrico off to execution. At this point, Azucena, who had been sharing the dungeon with her supposed son, triumphantly informs di Luna that he's just killed his own brother.

In the aria, "Stride la vampa," Azucena is recalling the events surrounding her mother's burning at the stake.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDS7N4SIqMI

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 12th, 2014, 04:55 PM
A is for Anna Netrebko, of course! :heart1: How could you guys think of anybody else??? :dejection:


Err because it begins with N? :p

Hoffmann
September 12th, 2014, 06:34 PM
A is for Almaviva, handsome and dashing and one of the greatest of all operatic heroes

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 12th, 2014, 11:16 PM
A is for Almaviva, handsome and dashing and one of the greatest of all operatic heroes

I agree. This guy Luiz Gazzola, a.k.a. Almaviva, is indeed handsome and dashing and one of the greatest of all operatic heroes.

The name, incidentally, is also used by a top Chilean wine, and as a character in some operas by Mozart, Rossini, Paisiello, and Corigliano - you find him in Beaumarchais as well. None of these other Almavivas, however, are as handsome and dashing and heroic as the original one, Opera Lively's Alma!

:biggrin:

I hope Anna Netrebko is reading this and agrees, dumps her fiancé, and becomes my second wife after I move to Utah.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 12th, 2014, 11:21 PM
Err because it begins with N? :p

Well, we'll just have to nominate her for both A and N! :happydance.2:

Soave_Fanciulla
September 12th, 2014, 11:47 PM
A delicious rival Anna....Caterina Antonacci - totally qualified to be in the "a" section

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01173/arts-graphics-2006_1173999a.jpg

http://www.standard.co.uk/incoming/article7887925.ece/alternates/w620/lestroyens.jpg

Soave_Fanciulla
September 13th, 2014, 07:34 AM
Ariadne, daughter of Minos, King of Crete, who helped Theseus defeat the Minotaur and is subsequently abandoned by him on Naxos, where she becomes the bride of Bacchus, is of course most famously represented in opera by Strauss' eponymous work Ariadne auf Naxos.

But we also meet her earlier on in the story in Birtwistle's The Minotaur, where it is clear that she is just itching to get away from her oppressive family life (and when you consider the rather unpleasant habits of her half-brother, are you surprised?)

A cause of great sadness to me is the loss of Monteverdi's opera on the subject - all that is left to us is the lament, here aptly sung by Anna Caterina in Amsterdam:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LARI9cIub1k

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 13th, 2014, 08:29 AM
Ildebrando d'Arcangelo

Alidoro

:love2:



http://youtu.be/G6pG4_5p8_M

Clayton
September 13th, 2014, 09:20 AM
A is for Accompagnato

or more fully recitativo accompagnato. It is the bits where there is talking accompanied by music.

5196

It is a bit different to some perceptions of opera when first encountered but the talking is a bit more than just the "Hi honey, I'm just on the train on the way home now..." kind of talking. It is "recitative" where the text is a generally more poetic and recited in a more artistic or expressive way and the music that accompanies can enhance this expression.
Also it can sort of shift the story along (especially when otherwise it takes Fred six and a half minutes to say "I love you" in the following aria)...

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 13th, 2014, 10:37 AM
A nod to contemporary opera

A is for (John) Adams, great American contemporary opera composer who wrote Nixon in China, Doctor Atomic and The Death of Klinghoffer.
A is for (Thomas) Àdes, great British contemporary opera composer who wrote The Tempest and Powder Her Face.
A is for (Dominick) Argento, great Italian-American contemporary opera composer who wrote Postcard from Morocco and The Aspern Papers.

Soave_Fanciulla
September 13th, 2014, 11:00 AM
A nod to contemporary opera

A is for (John) Adams, great American contemporary opera composer who wrote Nixon in China, Doctor Atomic and The Death of Klinghoffer.
A is for (Thomas) Àdes, great British contemporary opera composer who wrote The Tempest and Powder Her Face.
A is for (Dominick) Argento, great Italian-American contemporary opera composer who wrote Postcard from Morocco and The Aspern Papers.

Let's also add contemporary American composer Mark Adamo, who wrote the very popular "Little Women" based on the novel by Louisa May Alcott. His "Gospel of Mary Magdalene" premiered recently.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 13th, 2014, 11:12 AM
Let's also add contemporary American composer Mark Adamo, who wrote the very popular "Little Women" based on the novel by Louisa May Alcott. His "Gospel of Mary Magdalene" premiered recently.

True!

MAuer
September 13th, 2014, 12:15 PM
A is for Alberich, the Nibelung in Richard Wagner's tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen. He appears in three of the four operas, and after renouncing love, forges the Ring that is (temporarily) swiped by the chief god Wotan to pay off a pair of giant brothers for a certain construction project. Alberich puts a curse on the Ring, which pretty much gets the ball rolling for the events in the following three operas.
Here's the Nibelung cursing his ring:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWyJaeKcQXY

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 13th, 2014, 01:29 PM
He appears in three of the four operas

Not only that, but he's the freaking title role, which not many realize or acknowledge. He's also the only survivor at the end when there is all the mayhem. He opens and closes the whole thing. So, it's *his* opera, LOL.

Soave_Fanciulla
September 13th, 2014, 08:39 PM
A is for Alberich, the Nibelung in Richard Wagner's tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen. He appears in three of the four operas, and after renouncing love, forges the Ring that is (temporarily) swiped by the chief god Wotan to pay off a pair of giant brothers for a certain construction project. Alberich puts a curse on the Ring, which pretty much gets the ball rolling for the events in the following three operas.
Here's the Nibelung cursing his ring:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWyJaeKcQXY

I don't know if the video still appears the same to everyone, but to me Alberich here is a dead ringer for Jack Nicholson in the Shining. If I were those nixies I'd swim a mile.:scared2:

Amfortas
September 13th, 2014, 09:30 PM
Let's also add contemporary American composer Mark Adamo, who wrote the very popular "Little Women" based on the novel by Louisa May Alcott. His "Gospel of Mary Magdalene" premiered recently.

You always beat me to it. http://images.yuku.com/image/gif/f9f26f55274dedba16cdcd0c4a493a3657831e7f.jpg

Clayton
September 13th, 2014, 10:07 PM
A is for Tobia Gorrio

eh?

It's the pseudonym that Arrigo Boito (1842-1918) used when writing some of his works.

Well 'hoos he, wat's 'e dun and whadd'e 'av to hide?

Whoa! I'm trying to be clever does not mean I am clever.

As much as I understand he was a Italian composer and librettist. His librettos include Otello (Verdi) and La Gioconda (Ponchielli). I think his operatic compositions leave him as a bit of a one hit wonder with Mefistofele, though this was a more of a two hit wonder. First hit (1868) was more of a miss... it left him a bit battered and bruised which lead him to work under a pseudonym, an anagram of his name. His revision (1875) let it be recorded well in history.

5210
Via Arrigo Boito in Milan runs behind La Scala

MAuer
September 14th, 2014, 12:41 PM
A is for Anna Bolena, the first of three operas by Donizetti that are often referred to as the Tudor Trilogy or the Tudor Queens. Anne Boleyn's daughter Elizabeth I is the Tudor Queen who appears in the other two operas, Maria Stuarda and Roberto Devereux. And though she was of the House of Stuart, Mary was the daughter of Margaret Tudor, Henry VIII's sister.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=69atpi_K5zA

And after watching this video, let's hope Alma doesn't say A is for (cough, cough) assets . . .

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 14th, 2014, 01:11 PM
Haha, see, sospiro? If A is for Anna Bolena, then A can also be for Anna Netrebko! With even better reason, when Anna portrays Anna!

And of course Mary is right, A is also for cough cough Assets cough cough which makes of La Bellissima an even better candidate for the letter A, thus giving us the nice advantage of mentioning her twice, when we get to N!

(Now I feel like a Sesame Street character - minus the cough cough assets cough cough, of course, which would be weird to find in a G-rated TV show)

But let me add an important one:

A is for Annie, the Awesome Opera Lively member and good friend, and the biggest Simon Keenlyside fan in the world, which is a hallmark only behind the fact that she is also the biggest Simon Boccanegra fan in the world! Oh! I just got an insight. Maybe she likes the opera because the title role's first name is the same as her favorite performer's first name!

Here's to Annie a.k.a. sospiro (so that we can remember her when we get to S as well!) :kiss.1:

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 14th, 2014, 03:48 PM
Haha, see, sospiro? If A is for Anna Bolena, then A can also be for Anna Netrebko! With even better reason, when Anna portrays Anna!

And of course Mary is right, A is also for cough cough Assets cough cough which makes of La Bellissima an even better candidate for the letter A, thus giving us the nice advantage of mentioning her twice, when we get to N!

(Now I feel like a Sesame Street character - minus the cough cough assets cough cough, of course, which would be weird to find in a G-rated TV show)

But let me add an important one:

A is for Annie, the Awesome Opera Lively member and good friend, and the biggest Simon Keenlyside fan in the world, which is a hallmark only behind the fact that she is also the biggest Simon Boccanegra fan in the world! Oh! I just got an insight. Maybe she likes the opera because the title role's first name is the same as her favorite performer's first name!

Here's to Annie a.k.a. sospiro (so that we can remember her when we get to S as well!) :kiss.1:

Awesome post!!


but ... Can we start on the Bs?

Can we? Can we? Please?

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 14th, 2014, 05:33 PM
Awesome post!!


but ... Can we start on the Bs?

Can we? Can we? Please?

I'm sure you want B for Boccanegra but one might say that it's only good for S for Simon Boccanegra, since the name of an opera isn't usually alphabetized by the last name of the title character but rather by the first letter of the title, so, no Boccanegra for ya! :devilish:

Soave_Fanciulla
September 14th, 2014, 06:47 PM
Awesome post!!


but ... Can we start on the Bs?

Can we? Can we? Please?

Nonono wait - two more ideas at least for A but no time to compose them this morning....

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 14th, 2014, 07:50 PM
Nonono wait - two more ideas at least for A but no time to compose them this morning....

OK, I can wait a bit longer but I have a million ideas for Basses and Baritones


:tongue-new:

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 14th, 2014, 07:56 PM
I'm sure you want B for Boccanegra but one might say that it's only good for S for Simon Boccanegra, since the name of an opera isn't usually alphabetized by the last name of the title character but rather by the first letter of the title, so, no Boccanegra for ya! :devilish:

If you can bend the rules, then so can I!!! http://www.pic4ever.com/images/clap.gif

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 15th, 2014, 12:29 AM
If you can bend the rules, then so can I!!! http://www.pic4ever.com/images/clap.gif

I didn't bend the rules. It's been proven that Anna portrays Anna and has cough cough Assets cough cough. And besides, she is an A+++ lady, in singing, beauty, acting, and overall Awesome personality!

A is for Anna Netrebko!
A is for Anna Netrebko!
A is for Anna Netrebko!

:happydance.2:

OK, here. Regardless, we can always say this:

A is for Anna Netrebko's Assets:

5211

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 15th, 2014, 12:44 AM
OK, since we're dangerously close to moving to B, let's log in some more As.

A is for Claudio Abbado
A is for Acis and Galatea
A is for Adriana Lecouvreur
A is for Aggripina
A is for Pierrette Alarie
A is for Licia Albanese
A is for Albert Herring
A is for Alceste
A is for Aleko
A is for Ahmal and the Night Visitors
A is for L'Amico Fritz
A is for Andrea Chénier
A is for Victoria de los Angeles
A is for Arabella
A is for Ariadne auf Naxos
A is for Ariane et Barbe-bleue
A is for Ariodante
A is for Atys
A is for Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny

Soave_Fanciulla
September 15th, 2014, 03:36 AM
A is also for Aria, a vehicle for expressing emotion (and showing off beautiful legato and phrasing, insane coloratura, bonkers high Cs, etc etc)

Soave_Fanciulla
September 15th, 2014, 04:01 AM
OK, since we're dangerously close to moving to B, let's log in some more As.

A is for Claudio Abbado
A is for Acis and Galatea
A is for Adriana Lecouvreur
A is for Aggripina
A is for Pierrette Alarie
A is for Licia Albanese
A is for Albert Herring
A is for Alceste
A is for Aleko
A is for Ahmal and the Night Visitors
A is for L'Amico Fritz
A is for Andrea Chénier
A is for Victoria de los Angeles
A is for Arabella
A is for Ariadne auf Naxos
A is for Ariane et Barbe-bleue
A is for Ariodante
A is for Atys
A is for Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny

What's the hurry?

But if you insist...

A is for Albéniz, composer of Merlin
A is for Laura Aiken, Zerlinetta in the Gyndebourne Ariadne
A is for Roberta Alexandra, most recently appearing in Elektra from Aix
A is for Alfano, whose main claim to fame is not his own compositions (eg Cyrano de Bergera), but his rather unsatifactory ending for Puccini's Turandot
A is for Adam, whose opera Le Postillon de Longjumeau contains the aria 'Mes amis, écoutez l'histoire' which allows tenors to show off their high D
A is for Auber, whose Opera La Muette de Portici has two claims to fame: 1. the central character is mute ( in an opera!!!!!) and 2. its performance in Brussels in 1830 caused a riot which led to Belgian independence.
A is for Alceste, faithful wife of Admeto who sacrifices her life for her husband. Gluck wrote Alceste, Handel wrote Admeto.
A is for the lovely John Mark Ainsley, the best captain Vere ever. Other great tenors in a similar fach: Cyril Auvity, Paul Agnew.
A is for L'Arlesiana, an opera which is rarely heard in its entirety but whose aria È la solita storia del pastore is one of verismo's greatest hits.
A is for Francesco Araiza and Fabio Armiliato
A is for L'Africaine, based on the life of Vasco da Gama. Puzzling name really as the title role Sélika, is obviously Indian. Sélika wins the prize for most imaginative suicide: she dies by inhaling the perfume of the poisonous blossoms of the manchineel tree.
A is for Jaume Aragall, possessor of one of the most lovely tenor voices ever, but afflicted by crippling stage fright

Clayton
September 15th, 2014, 09:05 AM
A is for Alcina,

one of Handel's most popular operas. His thirtieth Italian opera, it premiered at the new Covent Garden theatre, the newest and biggest theatre in London, in 1735 with performances in the following year and 1737. This was a no-expenses-spared opera, with loads of money at the new theatre for new sets and singers. Competition from the newly formed Opera of the Nobility now housed at the King's Theatre added importance to the success of the opera.

It is a three act opera based on the 16th century poem Orlando furioso by Ludovic Ariosto about the sorceress (no relation to Harry Potter) Alcina who tricks heroes to coming to her island and falling in love with her. Her victim in this opera is Ruggiero, who whilst being rescued by Bradamante his betrothed, sees through the illusion when he puts on a magic ring (no relation to Tolkein or Nibelungen).
Aria Verdi Prati. There are many great arias in this opera but this one is a favourite. Ruggiero understanding that this idyllic life and his love was just an illusion that he must leave, nevertheless feels some sadness for leaving it behind. It is a very simple piece musically but together with the poetry of the situation, I find it striking. So simple was the music thought, at first the castrato Giovanni Carestini refused to sing it!


- - - Updated - - -

a is also for I will appreciate it if some one adds a post with a youtube clip of verdi prati

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 15th, 2014, 05:39 PM
What's the hurry?


I'm not in a hurry, sospiro is. I thought she might prevail in moving us to B, so I wanted to insert some As while I could.

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 15th, 2014, 06:07 PM
OK, since we're dangerously close to moving to B, let's log in some more As.

A is for Claudio Abbado
A is for Acis and Galatea
A is for Adriana Lecouvreur
A is for Aggripina
A is for Pierrette Alarie
A is for Licia Albanese
A is for Albert Herring
A is for Alceste
A is for Aleko
A is for Ahmal and the Night Visitors
A is for L'Amico Fritz
A is for Andrea Chénier
A is for Victoria de los Angeles
A is for Arabella
A is for Ariadne auf Naxos
A is for Ariane et Barbe-bleue
A is for Ariodante
A is for Atys
A is for Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny

OP said


Post anything; interesting or funny just to put a smile on a readers face but something (vaguely) to do with opera.

OP didn't say post an encyclopaedia

:p

Soave_Fanciulla
September 15th, 2014, 06:31 PM
OP said



OP didn't say post an encyclopaedia

:p

Trying to calm himself down after all the assets.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 16th, 2014, 12:29 AM
OP said

"Post anything; interesting or..."

OP didn't say post an encyclopaedia

:p

Encyclopedias are interesting.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 16th, 2014, 12:43 AM
Trying to calm himself down after all the assets.

But those assets are gifts that keep on giving.

As we move on to other letters, I could say:

B is for Anna Netrebko's breasts
C is for Anna Netrebko's cleavage
D is for Anna Netrebko's cup size (well, if they're not Ds, they give the impression that they are)

and so on and so forth (there are many other letters... none as elegant as cough cough assets cough cough, though...)

:biggrin:

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 16th, 2014, 04:36 AM
Italian bass baritone Simone Alberghini


http://youtu.be/8iay4chH7s4

Soave_Fanciulla
September 16th, 2014, 07:56 AM
Italian bass baritone Simone Alberghini


http://youtu.be/8iay4chH7s4

Who was once engaged to Anna Netrebko:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_KGPGgpnX5S8/TMWto9tCTfI/AAAAAAAAALU/OSmtTCOugWM/s1600/chiquitilla10.jpg

Clayton
September 16th, 2014, 08:20 AM
Who was once engaged to Anna Netrebko:
...


Um... I'm thinking if we all leave the AN posts to Almaviva...

we'll probably have enough posts for her.

- - - Updated - - -

Odds are 1/68 that he can (and probably will) post something about AN for every letter.

- - - Updated - - -

And Captain, this is not a challenge.

Clayton
September 16th, 2014, 11:33 AM
B is for Brindisi

A term derived from an old German toast, is a drinking song where after a toast is offered the other party members respond.

The most popular songs include

Libiamo ne' lieti calici, from La Traviata

Il segreto di esser felice, from Lucrezia Borgia

Si colmi il calice, from Macbeth

...

Just out of respect for the host, I pretty much always have a drink at hand during these songs.

MAuer
September 16th, 2014, 11:51 AM
B is for Beethoven.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6f/Beethoven.jpg/375px-Beethoven.jpg

He only wrote one opera (or three versions of one opera), but Fidelio is part of the mainstream repertoire, whereas the works of some of his contemporaries who wrote more than 100 operas have largely been forgotten.

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 16th, 2014, 04:20 PM
Benjamin Britten

I found him difficult to get into at first but I'm really learning to appreciate him now.

Nat said recently that one of the great things about following specific singers is that they can lead you to discover all sorts of lovely pieces. 18 months ago, I wouldn't have considered going to see a Britten opera but I wanted to hear my favourite bass so I went to see him in The Church Parables which were being performed as part of the centenary of Britten's birth.

This is one of the originals


http://youtu.be/DYSYYupdvVo

Soave_Fanciulla
September 16th, 2014, 06:37 PM
B is for Billy Budd, one of the above's greatest operas, and a wonderful study of tormented evil (Claggart), joyful innocence (Billy) and the failure to do the right thing in the face of "duty to authority" (Vere). Sung by an all-male cast, there are some beautiful melodies, none more touching than Billy's simple musings in his last hour before he is hanged.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WdGSryj5RQ

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 16th, 2014, 09:17 PM
Um... I'm thinking if we all leave the AN posts to Almaviva...

we'll probably have enough posts for her.



B if for La Bellissima, of course!

5215

Now, since I used A for Anna, then B is also for Barbara Hannigan, awesome soprano, conductor, and dancer who champions contemporary music like nobody. She is also smart and pretty.

5216

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 17th, 2014, 06:51 AM
B is for Brünnhilde, the best character in the world's best opera

http://www.cantabile-subito.de/Sopranos/Lawrence__Marjorie/lawrencebruennhilde.jpg

And B is also for Bayreuth, where it all started

http://www.bayreuth.de/images/kultur/festspiele/festspielhaus.jpg

MAuer
September 17th, 2014, 11:48 AM
B is for Karl Böhm and Leonard Bernstein, two of the 20th century's major Maestri who made many outstanding opera recordings, quite a few on the Deutsche Grammophon label.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/03/Karl_B%C3%B6hm.jpg http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6a/Leonard_Bernstein_by_Jack_Mitchell.jpg/345px-Leonard_Bernstein_by_Jack_Mitchell.jpg

And, of course, Bernstein was also a composer who wrote three operas, Trouble in Tahiti, A Quiet Place, and Candide, as well as a number of musicals, the best known of which are West Side Story and On The Town.

Clayton
September 17th, 2014, 08:14 PM
B is for Body Involuntary Movement

This manifests itself in a variety of different occasions not particular to opera but music in general.

The Spine Chill is a very familiar form where there is resonance between the listener and the music being heard, resulting in a dog-shake like syndrome.

The Arm Flick; particularly common amongst the Italian loggionisti style audience. A sudden gesturing of the arm (mostly the right but on occasion the left) thrust forward as if flicking something horrid off the hand, as a result of immediate displeasure of a performance.

Shuffle Foot results with one foot without any warning, sliding six inches forward causing a scraping noise to make immediate neighbours in the audience to momentarily glance at you. It is caused by a sudden surge in bio-chemicals by the stimulation of the music or by the fact you were bored out of your skull and were on the way to noddy land. This can occur with over consumption of alcohol preceding the performance or just by over excitement.

SSM is the term normally used to refer to Sudden Spasm Movement. There has been countless hours of research by many academic institutions that has not been invested in to the research of this but it broadly covers all of the above situations.

Warble mouth occurs when a non descript burble is spilt from the oral cavity. It normally occurs when such emotions are experienced that an attempt to shout “bravo” just doesn’t work as intended.



For any of the cases above, it is advised* that medical help is not required, as research has shown that these symptoms broadly occur across all samples of opera audiences within data sample**


*This is not the view of Opera Lively but of the publisher of this post only.
**Data sampled was the experience of one particular OL member, who has expressed the wish to remain anonymous.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 17th, 2014, 08:26 PM
B is for Body Involuntary Movement

This manifests itself in a variety of different occasions not particular to opera but music in general.

The Spine Chill is a very familiar form where there is resonance between the listener and the music being heard, resulting in a dog-shake like syndrome.

The Arm Flick; particularly common amongst the Italian loggionisti style audience. A sudden gesturing of the arm (mostly the right but on occasion the left) thrust forward as if flicking something horrid off the hand, as a result of immediate displeasure of a performance.

Shuffle Foot results with one foot without any warning, sliding six inches forward causing a scraping noise to make immediate neighbours in the audience to momentarily glance at you. It is caused by a sudden surge in bio-chemicals by the stimulation of the music or by the fact you were bored out of your skull and were on the way to noddy land. This can occur with over consumption of alcohol preceding the performance or just by over excitement.

SSM is the term normally used to refer to Sudden Spasm Movement. There has been countless hours of research by many academic institutions that has not been invested in to the research of this but it broadly covers all of the above situations.

Warble mouth occurs when a non descript burble is spilt from the oral cavity. It normally occurs when such emotions are experienced that an attempt to shout “bravo” just doesn’t work as intended.



For any of the cases above, it is advised* that medical help is not required, as research has shown that these symptoms broadly occur across all samples of opera audiences within data sampled**


*This is not the view of Opera Lively but of the publisher of this post only.
**Data sampled was the experience of one particular OL member, who has expressed the wish to remain anonymous.


You forgot air conducting (and the uncontrollable urge to do engage in it, to the great chagrin of seat companions). I'm particularly afflicted by this disabling condition.

PS - The condition is only annoying during live opera. At home, I actually bought a maestro's baton (no kidding, I do own one) so that I can do it properly, while watching a DVD.

Clayton
September 17th, 2014, 08:39 PM
...B is also for Barbara Hannigan, awesome soprano, conductor, and dancer who champions contemporary music...
5216

I think we should expand Barbara Hannigan further.

She was born in Canada and studied at the university of Toronto and the Conservatory of The Hague (amongst other institutions). There is a very personal and insightful interview with her on Opera Lively. Le Figaro commented on her performance (in Lulu) "...made history ...this woman must come from another planet..." She created the role of woman in George Benjamin's Written on Skin.

5219

5220

5221

Clayton
September 17th, 2014, 08:54 PM
You forgot air conducting (and the uncontrollable urge to do engage in it...

Yes, there are also times when you get so excited, a tiny bit of wee wee comes out... but I didn't mention it, did I?



Oops! Did i just say that out aloud?

Hoffmann
September 17th, 2014, 11:44 PM
B is for Bellini, almost certainly deserving of inclusion in the pantheon of the greatest operatic composers and without whom civilization itself likely would be in doubt.

Amfortas
September 18th, 2014, 01:11 AM
B is for Béla Bartók and his Bluebeard's Castle.

http://www.musicalcriticism.com/recordings/dvd-bluebeard.jpg

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 18th, 2014, 01:30 AM
I think we should expand Barbara Hannigan further.

She was born in Canada and studied at the university of Toronto and the Conservatory of The Hague (amongst other institutions). There is a very personal and insightful interview with her on Opera Lively. Le Figaro commented on her performance (in Lulu) "...made history ...this woman must come from another planet..." She created the role of woman in George Benjamin's Written on Skin.

5219

5220

5221

Thanks for this. Barbara is just amazing. What an artist!
I was re-watching the Written on Skin blu-ray disc this Sunday, since I'm currently involved with writing the guidebook to the opera. Oh my God, she is so incredibly good in acting and singing!!!

On March 7 she will be in Toronto singing Written on Skin. I'm tempted to go see her live. The annoying thing is that my birthday is March 8 and I usually throw a party, so, if I go to Toronto, I'll have to skip the party.

Adrian
September 18th, 2014, 05:00 AM
B is for Bellini, almost certainly deserving of inclusion in the pantheon of the greatest operatic composers and without whom civilization itself likely would be in doubt.

You just beat me to it. ;)

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 18th, 2014, 11:15 AM
without whom civilization itself likely would be in doubt.

Civilization itself is already in doubt since the end of Götterdämmerung. :)

MAuer
September 18th, 2014, 11:40 AM
B is for Il Barbiere di Siviglia, the name of operas composed by Gioacchino Rossini, Giovanni Paisiello, Nicolas Isouard, and Francesco Morlacci. All are based on the first play in Pierre Beaumarchais' Figaro Trilogy, but while Rossini's version has become a popular repertoire staple, the other three have largely been forgotten -- though Paisiello's is occasionally revived.

Clayton
September 18th, 2014, 04:15 PM
B is for Cecilia Bartoli

one of our favourite Roman mezzo-sopranos, who studied at the Accademia di Santa Cecilia...

and of course cover girl of the infamous Bellini and Body art review magazine, August edition


Bellini and Body art review magazine

...with Norma but this is the one where Cecilia Bartoli is about to show us her new embarrasing tattoo she got last night when on the sauce.

Bellini: Norma
Cecilia Bartoli (Norma), Sumi Jo (Adalgisa), John Osborn (Pollione) & Michele Pertusi (Oroveso), Liliana Nikiteanu (Clotilde), Reinaldo Macias (Flavio)
Orchestra La Scintilla, International Chamber Vocalists
Giovanni Antonini
Recorded April and September 2011 and January 2013, Evangelisch-reformierte Kirchgemeinde, Zürich-Oberstrass, Switzerland

5231


Bellini and Body art review magazine

So, Cecilia, how many tattoos did you get?

5232

Four? Are you telling the truth?

5233

Come on now, tell me honestly. How many tattoos did you get?

5234

Five! Now was that a really good idea? What do you think your mother will say? How do you feel?

5235

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 18th, 2014, 04:23 PM
Civilization itself is already in doubt since the end of Götterdämmerung. :)

Bs Luiz, Bs! :sarcastic:

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 18th, 2014, 04:28 PM
And talking of Bs --- whose birthday is it today?

Clue - check out Anna Netrebko news.

Clayton
September 18th, 2014, 04:37 PM
And talking of Bs --- whose birthday is it today?

Clue - check out Anna Netrebko news.

Just for once,

I would like to be the one who says

Don't encourage him!

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 18th, 2014, 04:41 PM
Just for once,

I would like to be the one who says

Don't encourage him!

Well he's been going on about La Bellissima ever since I've known him; and he forgets her birthday!! :rotgl:

Hoffmann
September 18th, 2014, 07:56 PM
B is for Berlin, very possibly the world capital of opera: the city has not one but 3 major opera companies, each with a full schedule. Who says state subsidies are a waste of money - what do they know??

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 18th, 2014, 11:01 PM
Well he's been going on about La Bellissima ever since I've known him; and he forgets her birthday!! :rotgl:

Darn! :dejection:

But I promise her that if she dumps her new fiancé and marries me, I won't forget her birthday again! :culpability:

Clayton
September 19th, 2014, 10:01 AM
B is for Beatrice di Tenda

a tragedia lirica in two acts, it is the ninth of ten operas written by Vincenzo Bellini (1801-35) and the last collaboration with Felice Romani (1788-1865).

It premiered at Teatro La Fenice, Venice, 16 March 1833 with the title role being written for the legendary Giuditta Pasta. It was unsuccessful during Bellini’s lifetime and only had a run of six performances with shouts of “Norma!” being heard from the galley on the opening night.

Romani had recently been appointed by La Scala to write all opera librettos and was over stretched; he only started on this libretto three months before the premiere. Even Bellini had started to see a possible disaster the month before. Music recycled from earlier works and some unfinished sketches are evidence to the hurried work.

Nevertheless the work is a one of the greats of belcanto opera, with some melodies of sublime beauty, great characterization and wonderful poetry and is one of my absolute favourites (and apparently also of the cat staring at me through the window as I write this listening to it). It was also championed by Richard Bonynge and Joan Sutherland.

The opera is based on a true Italian story from 1416.

There are many very good recordings available of this opera but my choice remains Pinchas Steinberg recorded by Nightingale Classics with Edita Gruberova (1992 live performance).

5236

Soave_Fanciulla
September 19th, 2014, 10:45 AM
B is for Bizet, who wrote that godsend to all struggling opera houses, the phenomenally popular Carmen. I won't say any more about that, except that despite writing an opera which certainly made a Hispanophile of at least one acquaintance of mine, Bizet never set foot in Spain.

Bizet liked exploring exotic locations for his operas: his second most popular opera Les pêcheurs de perles is set in Ceylon, and my recommendation for today is based on an oriental tale by Alfred de Musset:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41KMjB00KML.jpg

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 19th, 2014, 11:26 AM
B is for Bizet, who wrote that godsend to all struggling opera houses, the phenomenally popular Carmen. I won't say any more about that, except that despite writing an opera which certainly made a Hispanophile of at least one acquaintance of mine, Bizet never set foot in Spain.

Bizet liked exploring exotic locations for his operas: his second most popular opera Les pêcheurs de perles is set in Ceylon, and my recommendation for today is based on an oriental tale by Alfred de Musset:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41KMjB00KML.jpg
Is it really good? Because while Carmen and Pêcheurs are both spectacular, I thought that the one people usually place right after these two, La Jolie Fille de Perth, was garbage, so I'm a bit afraid for the quality of a fourth one. I only know the three I've mentioned.

Adrian
September 19th, 2014, 12:13 PM
B = Beverly Sills.
I Know you have to like this voice but it gives me goosebumps every time.
I love her Lucia and this is also very high quality.


http://s6.postimg.org/4ti6387wx/Sills_Queens.jpg (http://postimage.org/)

Clayton
September 19th, 2014, 12:31 PM
B = Beverly Sills.
I Know you have to like this voice but it gives me goosebumps every time.
I love her Lucia and this is also very high quality.
...

Yes, I love her Lucia. :)

MAuer
September 19th, 2014, 01:07 PM
B is for the late Carlo Bergonzi, one of the greatest Italian tenors in the second half of the 20th century . . .

http://content.answcdn.com/main/content/img/amg/classical_artists/drz000/z052/z052651iu53.jpg

. . . and another leading international singer from the same period, mezzo soprano Teresa Berganza (whom we hope will be with us for many more years yet).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7f/Teresa_Berganza_1957.jpg/315px-Teresa_Berganza_1957.jpg

Soave_Fanciulla
September 19th, 2014, 10:59 PM
B is for the late Carlo Bergonzi, one of the greatest Italian tenors in the second half of the 20th century . . .

http://content.answcdn.com/main/content/img/amg/classical_artists/drz000/z052/z052651iu53.jpg



Just got this:heart1:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ola5Ca6WL._SY300_.jpg

Soave_Fanciulla
September 19th, 2014, 11:02 PM
Is it really good? Because while Carmen and Pêcheurs are both spectacular, I thought that the one people usually place right after these two, La Jolie Fille de Perth, was garbage, so I'm a bit afraid for the quality of a fourth one. I only know the three I've mentioned.

Well, it's a long time since I watched it, but looking at my spreadsheet I gave the DVD 4 stars out of 5, so I definitely enjoyed the show.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 19th, 2014, 11:57 PM
Well, it's a long time since I watched it, but looking at my spreadsheet I gave the DVD 4 stars out of 5, so I definitely enjoyed the show.

You have a spreadsheet with your opera ratings? :ohmy:

:tiphat:

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 20th, 2014, 12:11 AM
Yes, I love her Lucia. :)

I agree. Beverly Sills was tops. I love her voice and her agile coloratura. Also, her importance to opera in New York City was great, in her capacity as general manager of NYCO. She was the soul of the company as a performer, and then for another decade as an administrator. Then she was also the chair woman at Lincoln Center and the Met. She was a great advocate for opera and fundraiser, and also got involved in charity. A very nice woman.

Soave_Fanciulla
September 20th, 2014, 12:19 AM
You have a spreadsheet with your opera ratings? :ohmy:

:tiphat:

I have a spreadsheet with every opera DVD/CD/recital that I own. When I watch or listen I give it a rating.

I'm on 2146 items:o

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 20th, 2014, 12:32 AM
I have a spreadsheet with every opera DVD/CD/recital that I own. When I watch or listen I give it a rating.

I'm on 2146 items:o

TWO thousand one hundred forty-six items rated??? :ohmy::ohmy::ohmy::ohmy:

Now I know why the poor girls have nothing to eat! :dejection:

http://www.110pounds.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/clipart-blob-hungry-with-food-sign.gif

Amfortas
September 20th, 2014, 01:25 AM
B = Beverly Sills.

Also known as Bubbles!

Soave_Fanciulla
September 20th, 2014, 03:41 AM
TWO thousand one hundred forty-six items rated??? :ohmy::ohmy::ohmy::ohmy:[SIZE=7][SIZE=3]


Oops, only in the catalogue, not all rated yet.

Hoffmann
September 20th, 2014, 11:59 AM
I agree. Beverly Sills was tops. I love her voice and her agile coloratura. Also, her importance to opera in New York City was great, in her capacity as general manager of NYCO. She was the soul of the company as a performer, and then for another decade as an administrator. Then she was also the chair woman at Lincoln Center and the Met. She was a great advocate for opera and fundraiser, and also got involved in charity. A very nice woman.

I only saw Beverly Sills sing one time (Barber of Seville), when NYCO toured to DC and, on top of her wonderful singing, she had a charismatic presence who absolutely sparkled onstage. I met her once and got her to autograph my book when she came to a meeting at the National Endowment for the Arts, when I was working in the budget office. Very, very charming woman.

MAuer
September 20th, 2014, 12:03 PM
B is for La Boheme, the name of operas by Giacomo Puccini and Ruggero Leoncavallo. Puccini's version, of course, is by far the most popular and one of the repertoire warhorses guaranteed to draw audiences.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiTHjfmSyQU

Adrian
September 20th, 2014, 03:21 PM
I only saw Beverly Sills sing one time (Barber of Seville), when NYCO toured to DC and, on top of her wonderful singing, she had a charismatic presence who absolutely sparkled onstage. I met her once and got her to autograph my book when she came to a meeting at the National Endowment for the Arts, when I was working in the budget office. Very, very charming woman.

I am not the jealous type but this.....I envy you. ;)

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 20th, 2014, 04:51 PM
I am not the jealous type but this.....I envy you. ;)

I think Hoffmann is our member who has the most impressive record of seeing live many great performers!

Hoffmann
September 20th, 2014, 08:43 PM
I think Hoffmann is our member who has the most impressive record of seeing live many great performers!

It is one of the distinct advantages of living in a big city, and one of the things that endeared living in Washington to me from the beginning. Most of the performances I was fortunate to attend happened in the years right after I moved to Washington in 1975. The good news is that I was interested enough to take advantage of the opportunity when it was available. The bad news is it wasn't very long before the kind of touring that made the Kennedy Center such a jewel became so wildly expensive that it stopped completely. I am a very fortunate opera lover.

MAuer
September 21st, 2014, 12:03 PM
B is for the leading mezzo Agnes Baltsa, one of von Karajan's favorites who was at her peak in the late 20th century, and who is still maintaining an active career.

Clayton
September 22nd, 2014, 11:29 AM
B is for Basso

the lowest of the male voices written for opera, often portraying a character of power or nobility and a more general term that under which falls many subcategories.

A couple of examples would be:

Basso buffo, such as Leporello in Don Giovanni
Basso cantante, such as Silva in Ernani
Basso profundo, such as Fiesco in Simon Boccanegra

Clayton
September 22nd, 2014, 11:42 AM
C is for Cupid

Sometimes known as Amore or Eros, depending on the origins of the story, pops up in many, many places. Sometimes as a mischievious rascal and sometimes with grave responsability.

Clayton
September 22nd, 2014, 11:56 AM
c is for continuity...

as I will be going offline in the next day or so for a few weeks, I hope all you guys will keep this thread alive...

:)

MAuer
September 22nd, 2014, 02:11 PM
C is for La Clemenza di Tito, the title of operas by Mozart, Gluck, and Josef Mysliveček. The title character is the Roman Emperor Titus Vespasianus, better known in history as Vespasian, whose clemency is taxed to the maximum by the betrayal of his friend Sesto, instigated by the jealous Vitellia after Tito chose yet another woman (Sesto's sister Servilia) rather than her to be his Empress. But Servilia is in love with another one of Sesto's pals, Annio, and declines the honor.

Here's the aria "Se all' impero" in which Tito broods over the fact that his duties as Emperor require him to be severe, and ultimately decides that he'd rather not be Emperor if he has to be cruel. (This dude may not look like an ancient Roman Emperor, but he certainly can sing. :love8:)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vVKURF-9_g

Hoffmann
September 22nd, 2014, 04:27 PM
I will leave the biggest "C" of them all to DA, who I know will do justice to the posting...

Gigli13
September 22nd, 2014, 07:37 PM
I will be barred from Greece for this: Caruso great Neapolitan tenor. Then like Paul Lynn to block Maria Caniglia's. Then half a last name acoustic recording soprano omit the Galli and leave the Curci. 1938 at the Met Caniglia with Gigli vs Callas with Di Stefano. Both excellent in Tosca but how does power beat those beautiful Italian accents. Or for B's to be fair to the Non-Italian voices the great
Bjorling paired with Hjordis Schymberg (Aug 29, 1939) other C's Correlli . Callas for power and drama but those Golden Age Ladies had voices without an edge. Even though her first name only started with a C, Claudia Muzio had enough power yet a voice of pure cream. If this doesn't convince a listener wait til you guys get to T.

Soave_Fanciulla
September 23rd, 2014, 07:14 AM
Great master of the patter song - no comic Rossini or Donizetti opera is really complete without Alessandro Corbelli:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXF1yoXKF3o

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 23rd, 2014, 04:12 PM
Great master of the patter song - no comic Rossini or Donizetti opera is really complete without Alessandro Corbelli:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXF1yoXKF3o

How utterly fabulous!!!

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 23rd, 2014, 05:59 PM
Piero Cappuccilli

Cappuccilli trained as a deep sea diver - no wonder he had such superb breath control.


http://youtu.be/TA_00WTmaU0

Amfortas
September 23rd, 2014, 07:39 PM
Luigi Cherubini (1760 - 1842), an Italian composer who wrote operas for Paris's Théâtre Feydeau. He is best known today for his Médée.
http://operamag.cluster002.ovh.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/n55-anniversaire-cherubini-2.jpg

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 24th, 2014, 04:20 AM
C is for Domenico Cimarosa

Il maestro di cappella: a 20 minute piece of froth


http://youtu.be/aR1LZCetMIQ

and the more well known

Il matrimonio segreto


http://youtu.be/NmlxiKPV-zY

Ann Lander (sospiro)
September 24th, 2014, 04:30 AM
C is for Josep Maria Carreras i Coll otherwise known as José Carreras and my first opera love.

Hundreds of clips to choose from but in keeping with the letter C, you can't get bigger than this C.


http://youtu.be/la9Yu1XiqjU

MAuer
September 24th, 2014, 12:11 PM
C is for Cosi fan tutte, one of three operas Mozart composed to librettos by Lorenzo da Ponte. And C is also for "Come scoglio," Fiordiligi's aria from the same.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFp4Oqz49As

JohnGerald
September 24th, 2014, 07:15 PM
Most of you kids do not remember one of the truly great "C"s, no doubt due to your youth. But Franco Corelli had a fantastic voice (and was tall and good looking, ladies).

Soave_Fanciulla
September 24th, 2014, 11:35 PM
Most of you kids do not remember one of the truly great "C"s, no doubt due to your youth. But Franco Corelli had a fantastic voice (and was tall and good looking, ladies).

Just finished listening to his Don Carlo - and I'm afraid that although I can see he might be thrilling if you want a lot of loud singing and high notes, I didn't enjoy his performance much - nuance and finesse not in his musical vocabulary, not really much attention to the meaning of the words, and by the end I was ready to scream if I heard one more muddy consonant and muffled "s" ("Shacro giuro legò a queshto mio cor...")

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
September 24th, 2014, 11:44 PM
Most of you kids do not remember one of the truly great "C"s, no doubt due to your youth. But Franco Corelli had a fantastic voice (and was tall and good looking, ladies).

What? Of course we all know Franco Corelli! :fish4:

MAuer
September 25th, 2014, 12:06 PM
C is for Cinderella, the heroines of operas by Rossini (La Cenerentola) and Massenet (Cendrillon).
Here's Joyce Di Donato appearing as Cinders in her Italian and French guises:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3reLK2FbNI


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=av8AwaCrEXE

Soave_Fanciulla
September 25th, 2014, 06:40 PM
C is for Cinderella, the heroines of operas by Rossini (La Cenerentola) and Massenet (Cendrillon).
Here's Joyce Di Donato appearing as Cinders in her Italian and French guises:


C is also for Alice Coote, the prince in the Cendrillon clip above. Also worth checking out is her Nerone in a DVD with Dani de Niese. She is suitably deranged while still singing very well.

Gigli13
October 12th, 2014, 06:37 PM
5316
5314

Clayton
November 4th, 2014, 09:48 AM
D is for Doenngohthea,

A type of opera that exists all over the world and throughout the history of the art.

It is typically characterized by the listener who for whatever reason decides that they “do not want to listen to that kind of opera” or simply states “I don’t go there”.

These types of operas are mostly recognized within the opera community as having a detrimental effect on listening pleasure as it reduces the number of pieces available.

It is generally born out of either a misconception (it’s too faffy, too complicated, I don’t consider that real opera), a first experience that had negative consequences or in some cases a genuine conflict with the receptor’s neurobiology.

In the latter cases, studies have shown* that this may not be innate but could have environmental factors contributing. For this reason, Doenngohthea’s should be revisited under different conditions (inc. temporal).
Similarly it is advised that all Doenngohthea’s should be addressed when and where possible.


Related
See also Doennlaekhuh and Doennlaekim

Clayton
November 4th, 2014, 10:58 AM
D is for Ghena Dimitrova,

A Bulgarian soprano (1941 – 2005) who made her debut as Abigaille at Sofia in 1966.

After winning an international singing competition in Sofia in 1970, her career took her all over the world, including La Scala, Covent Garden and the Met where her repertoire included Turandot, Elvira (Ernani),La Gioconda, Lady Macbeth and Aida.

The exciting drama and power that is Dimitrova as Abigaille can be experienced with the excellent recording with Sinopoli in 1982.

Verdi: Nabucco
Piero Cappuccilli (Nabucco), Plácido Domingo (Ismaele), Evgeny Nesterenko (Zaccaria), Ghena Dimitrova (Abigaille), Lucia Valentini Terrani (Fenena), Kurt Rydl (Gran Sacerdote), Volker Horn (Abdallo), Lucia Popp (Anna)
Chorus & Orchestra of German Opera Berlin, Giuseppe Sinopoli

5505

MAuer
November 4th, 2014, 12:58 PM
D is for Donizetti, one of the great bel canto composers of the 19th century, and D is also for his opera Don Pasquale.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ab1-furp1LU

(I figured Alma would enjoy this clip of La Bellissima as Norina. :) )

Amfortas
November 4th, 2014, 02:44 PM
D is for Ghena Dimitrova.

D is also for Ghena's sister, Doenngohthea Dimitrova.

Ann Lander (sospiro)
November 4th, 2014, 06:26 PM
Some more from Donizetti's Don Pasquale from Mr Hampson + son-in-law


http://youtu.be/cssPOwU1jNo

Gigli13
November 6th, 2014, 04:38 AM
551455155516

Adrian
November 6th, 2014, 06:07 AM
D is for Christina Deuetkom.
My home land soprano who past away a few months ago,

http://s6.postimg.org/53l38tx5d/image_2014_08_09.jpg (http://postimage.org/)

Clayton
November 6th, 2014, 10:59 AM
D is for Christina Deuetkom.
My home land soprano who past away a few months ago,
...

Dutch soprano 28 August 1931 - 7 August 2014
as Norma in Florence, 1973

5519

MAuer
November 6th, 2014, 12:34 PM
D is for Antonín Dvořák, the composer of several operas, of which Rusalka is the most popular. Its best-known aria is the title character's Song to the Moon, sung here by Camilla Nylund.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EFddQnSdij0

Gigli13
November 6th, 2014, 08:02 PM
5521552255235524552555265527
Dutch soprano 28 August 1931 - 7 August 2014
as Norma in Florence, 1973

5519
She sang in Attila in Chicago on October 25, 1980.

Clayton
November 7th, 2014, 09:02 AM
D is for Deidamia,

catalogued as HWV 42 and the last opera composed by Handel. The libretto is by Paolo Antonio Rolli, an Italian poet resident in London. It premiered 10 January 1741 at Lincoln’s Inn Field Theatre.

Amongst waning interest in the Italian opera in London (and maybe also due to a misunderstanding/disagreement with supporters), it was not a success having only three performances.

The libretto takes us to the Greek island of Scyros, where young Achilles has been hidden, disguised as a girl Pyrrha under the care of the King Lycomedes, for fear of a prediction that he would be killed in the Trojan war. He falls in love with the daughter of Lycomedes, Deidamia but they are separated when Ulysses and Phoenix come in search of Achilles to help fight Troy.

The opera is a lighter more comical approach than the more traditional strong dramatic usual for the classics, a reflection of the changing preference of Handel but maybe not of the audience at that time.

There are a number of bright stars in this piece, just one example being the Lycomedes’ aria “Nel riposo e nel contento” a sad acceptance of ageing.

The opera was revived at Halle in 1953 and now there are recordings available in both CD and video format. A recommended opera for all Handel, baroque and opera fans.


2002 recording by Alan Curtis and Il Complesso Barocco available at all good music stores.

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Simone Kermes (Deidamia), Dominique Labelle (Nerea), Anna Maria Panzarella (Achille), Anna Bonitatibus (Ulisse), Furio Zanasi (Fenice) & Antonio Abete (Licomede)

Soave_Fanciulla
November 7th, 2014, 09:38 AM
D is for Don Giovanni, the naughtiest boy in the whole of opera. And who wouldn't fall for this one:love_heart::


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FY6VV3Z-Dc4

MAuer
November 7th, 2014, 02:06 PM
D is for Anton Dermota, one of the leading Mozart tenors of the mid-20th century (who also later moved into the spinto repertoire). Here he is singing Don Ottavio's "Il mio Tesoro."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADhztZDePIg

Ann Lander (sospiro)
November 7th, 2014, 05:15 PM
D is for Plácido Domingo. Still going strong at (allegedly) 73 years of age. I've heard some stories about him which would make your hair curl and he's not really a baritone but for now let's just listen to him in his prime.


http://youtu.be/1eMtK2-0GOU

Soave_Fanciulla
November 7th, 2014, 09:48 PM
D is for Plácido Domingo. Still going strong at (allegedly) 73 years of age. I've heard some stories about him which would make your hair curl and he's not really a baritone but for now let's just listen to him in his prime.


http://youtu.be/1eMtK2-0GOU

He he I might have told you one of those stories which I heard from the horse's mouth!

And no I'm not going to share it on the internet but let's just say that if he'd remained a baritone in his youth he could have sung the naughtiest boy in opera without batting an eyelid.

Ann Lander (sospiro)
November 8th, 2014, 07:16 AM
He he I might have told you one of those stories which I heard from the horse's mouth!

;)


And no I'm not going to share it on the internet but let's just say that if he'd remained a baritone in his youth he could have sung the naughtiest boy in opera without batting an eyelid.

Indeed!

MAuer
November 8th, 2014, 11:47 AM
D is for Dulcamara, the quack "doctor" in Donizetti's L'Elisir d'Amore, and for the bass-baritone Ildebrando D'Arcangelo.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmGQQC0m1QU

Soave_Fanciulla
November 8th, 2014, 08:10 PM
D is for Dulcamara, the quack "doctor" in Donizetti's L'Elisir d'Amore, and for the bass-baritone Ildebrando D'Arcangelo.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmGQQC0m1QU

My favourite patter song ever. It's hilarious.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
November 8th, 2014, 08:24 PM
D is for Joyce DiDonato, the American Diva, here as Dejanira, in the best mad scene ever.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOFHISqfwjk

Amfortas
November 8th, 2014, 10:04 PM
D is for Joyce DiDonato, the American Diva, here as Dejanira, in the best mad scene ever.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOFHISqfwjk


My favourite patter song ever. It's hilarious.

xxxxxxxxxx

MAuer
November 10th, 2014, 02:14 PM
D is for another leading international singer of the mid-20th century, Lisa Della Casa. The Swiss soprano was especially noted for her interpretation of Mozart and Strauss roles.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Upg6wwaS2cs

Clayton
November 11th, 2014, 10:31 AM
E is for Epilogue

err... we have operas with prologues but are there any epilogues?

Amfortas
November 11th, 2014, 02:11 PM
Clayton, I can't believe you didn't start out with your favorite "E"!

You'll kick yourself if I have to tell you.

Clayton
November 11th, 2014, 02:31 PM
:confused:

Um...

err...

'ang on, let me go put on some shin pads first then.


- - - Updated - - -

I just slapped myself.

Soave_Fanciulla
November 11th, 2014, 05:41 PM
E is for Epilogue

err... we have operas with prologues but are there any epilogues?

How about Don Giovanni? That last scene always sounds like an epilogue. And the last scene of Les Contes D'Hoffmann.

Ann Lander (sospiro)
November 11th, 2014, 07:10 PM
E is for Ettore Bastianini


http://youtu.be/2eX0bQsW0uA

Hoffmann
November 12th, 2014, 12:22 AM
E is for Ella giammai m'amò (Don Carlos), perhaps the grandest of all bass arias.

Here, heard and seen with Nicolai Ghiaurov as Philip II:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzEu727qabs

Soave_Fanciulla
November 12th, 2014, 02:58 AM
E is for Ernani


http://youtu.be/1Vj9VR1Uffg

See, what is she doing wandering off with Pav in that silly wig when she could have glorious Ruggero???

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
November 12th, 2014, 04:12 AM
E is for Elina Garanca, the great Latvian mezzo with the beautiful timbre of voice and the gorgeous eyes, here performing with our Anna in a recording section - and this clip is particularly nice because we can follow the vocal score.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2vI6Jjeu8Q

MAuer
November 12th, 2014, 01:26 PM
E is for Die Entführung aus dem Serail (The Abduction From the Seraglio), which, along with Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute) are Mozart's two best-known operas composed in the German Singspiel style. Belmonte's opening aria is sung here by the incomparable Fritz Wunderlich:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3WEhdjohTQ

(The clip also includes a scene from Strauss' Die schweigsame Frau with Wunderlich and soprano Ingeborg Hallstein.)

Ann Lander (sospiro)
November 12th, 2014, 06:01 PM
See, what is she doing wandering off with Pav in that silly wig when she could have glorious Ruggero???

Indeed!:love2:

Clayton
November 12th, 2014, 07:26 PM
Clayton, Clayton, Clayton!

E is for Edita!
...


Oh codswallop! :fish4:

I thought you meant that; at one point.

I over thought it and have been going round and round in circles. So much so that even Doctor Who would look like a low mileage traveller. I was going for Elsa, who I thought you meant and thought to wait for your authorative post.

Amfortas
November 12th, 2014, 07:39 PM
Well if you'd posted as much about Elsa as you have about Edita, that might have been what I meant.

But you didn't, so it wasn't. :p

Clayton
November 12th, 2014, 08:28 PM
Well if you'd posted as much about Elsa as you have about Edita, that might have been what I meant.

But you didn't, so it wasn't. :p


Yup. My brain doesn't function in the slightest bit logically.


- - - Updated - - -


Yup. My brain doesn't function in the slightest bit


- - - Updated - - -


Yup. My brain doesn't function in the slightest


- - - Updated - - -


Yup. My brain doesn't function


- - - Updated - - -


Yup. My brain

Amfortas
November 12th, 2014, 08:46 PM
Yup.

Hoffmann
November 13th, 2014, 12:09 AM
E is for (the sublime) Elena Suliotis, the reigning Abigaille assoluta:

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Clayton
November 13th, 2014, 10:57 AM
Clayton, Clayton, Clayton!

E is for Edita!
...


Let us expand on this.

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KS Edita Gruberová, born 23 Dec 1946 Bratislava, Slovakia (then Czechoslovakia), is a coloratura soprano. Known to her fans as "The Queen of Coloratura", "The Queen of Belcanto", "L'Unica" and "La Santa di Bratislava", she is widely regarded (about the width of my living room) as one of the greatest coloratura sopranos on modern recordings. She is known for her voice of great agility and tonal clarity.

She studied at the Bratislava Conservatory and made her debut as Rosina in Bratislava in 1968 and two years later performed as the Queen of the Night at the Vienna Staatsoper, February 1970.
Her international breakthrough came with the new production in 1976 of Ariadne auf Naxos as Zerbinetta under Karl Böhm. Since then she has performed at all the important international stages, among other at the Met, the Scala, the ROH Covent Garden, the Opéra National Paris, the Deutschen Oper Berlin, the Bayerischen Staatsoper, the Opernhaus Zürich, the Hamburgischen Staatsoper, the Teatro Comunale Florenz, the Liceu in Barcelona, the Salzburger Festspielen and at the Festival in Glyndebourne.

She has the honorific title Kammersängerin (abbreviated KS) of Austria.


Some (but not all) favourites

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MAuer
November 13th, 2014, 01:11 PM
E is for Electra, here in one of her several operatic incarnations as Elettra in Mozart's Idomeneo. This lady can do Mad Scenes with the best of them. (Anja Harteros' costume will have Alma wishing for a "wardrobe malfunction.")


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dvPlf8O_xs

Soave_Fanciulla
November 13th, 2014, 05:19 PM
E is for Electra, here in one of her several operatic incarnations as Elettra in Mozart's Idomeneo. This lady can do Mad Scenes with the best of them. (Anja Harteros' costume will have Alma wishing for a "wardrobe malfunction.")


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dvPlf8O_xs

I love her in this. She really chews up the scenery.

Soave_Fanciulla
November 13th, 2014, 05:33 PM
E is for Die Entführung aus dem Serail, Mozart's "Turkish" opera, full of youthful exuberance and idealism. Dramatically the most important role is the speaking one of Bassa Selim, the renegade Christian turned magnanimous despot (although there are some pretty nasty undercurrents made explicit by more recent European productions)

However for a straight telling you simply can't go wrong with this perfect little gem:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51TzjkXzsvL.jpg

An interesting semi doco /semi opera is Mozart in Turkey (http://vimeo.com/51526127): the making of an opera, with fully staged scenes in Turkish locations, with Paul Groves and Désirée Rancatore.

http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMTY5MTE4ODQ1NV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMDIxMTUyMQ@@._ V1_SY317_CR6,0,214,317_AL_.jpg

Floria
November 13th, 2014, 08:36 PM
E is for Elinor Ross
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E is for Eleanor Steber
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MAuer
November 14th, 2014, 12:44 PM
E is for Elizabeth I of England, a character in Donizetti's Maria Stuarda and Roberto Devereux, Rossini's Elisabetta, regina d'Inghilterra, Britten's Gloriana, and probably a few more operas of which I'm unaware.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/af/Darnley_stage_3.jpg/330px-Darnley_stage_3.jpg

Adrian
November 14th, 2014, 01:18 PM
E is for Elinor Ross


E is for Eleanor Steber
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Another Steber fan, very rare species ;)

Clayton
November 20th, 2014, 02:51 PM
F is for Falsetto,

(from Italian for false) is a treble range produced by a technique of using only part of the vocal chord. It is used for comic effect in opera though also used sometimes where a tenor can not reach top notes in modal voice.
In the seemingly highly complicated world of operatic voice classification the modern countertenor (sometimes replacing parts originally written for castrato) will also use falsetto for part of his upper range.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
November 20th, 2014, 03:34 PM
F is for Ferruccio Furlanetto (no doubt that this one belongs in the letter F), the great Italian bass, here singing one of the most beautiful bass arias in the entire repertory, "Ella giammai m'amò" from Don Carlo, at La Scala:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzwwGYqyK-c

Floria
November 20th, 2014, 06:49 PM
F is for Franco Corelli

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Amfortas
November 20th, 2014, 07:20 PM
F is for Floria Tosca. Who is . . . pretty cool.

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5336/10059692075_f6ea5f0501_b.jpg

Floria
November 21st, 2014, 03:23 AM
F is for Giordano's Fedora with Mirella Freni

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MAuer
November 21st, 2014, 12:46 PM
This is just too obvious for me . . .

F is for Fidelio, Beethoven's only opera, and for its hero, Florestan, who is rescued by his wife Leonore (a.k.a. Fidelio) from the tyrcannical prison governor Don Pizarro. For my tastes, the best Florestan yet is Jonas Kaufmann -- sounds fabulous, and actually looks like a starving prisoner.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJEUqzFcLkQ

Floria
November 21st, 2014, 01:44 PM
F is for Ferruccio Tagliavini

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F is for Le Nozze di Figaro

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Hoffmann
November 21st, 2014, 01:59 PM
F is for Fafner - giant, dragon (giant dragon?), wife stealer, real estate developer, bling admirer and dramatic antagonist par excellence.


Here, as characterized by Andreas Kriegenburg for the Bayerische Staatsoper Ring, 2012:

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Soave_Fanciulla
November 23rd, 2014, 06:59 AM
F is for Faust, a character from the eponymous work by Goethe, whose flawed pact with the devil has inspired works by Gounod (Faust), Boito (Mefistofele), Berlioz (la Damnation de Faust), Busoni (Doktor Faust), and Stravinsky (The Rake's Progress), among others. I've only listed the ones I know personally.

My favourite is probably the Stravinsky, with the Berlioz coming second. Which is yours?

MAuer
November 23rd, 2014, 01:33 PM
F is for Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, one of the great lyric baritones of the 20th century, and for Ferenc Fricsay, a leading mid-century Maestro who made many opera recordings for Deutsche Grammophon -- including Fidelio, with Fischer-Dieskau as the most truly menacing Pizarro I've ever heard. (The same recording also has Gottlob Frick as Rocco.)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1s_65mxDPk

Floria
November 24th, 2014, 01:23 PM
F is for Figaro, Figaro, Figaro

Clayton
November 24th, 2014, 04:17 PM
F is for Fioritura

(Italian: flourish, flowering) when long and complex decorations are added to a composition, these are known as fioritura. Sometimes referred to as "coloratura" (Italian: colouring).

Clayton
November 24th, 2014, 06:04 PM
F for I have failed to hear this opera yet...

... I thought I would take advantage of your post

but German subtitles? Maybe not good for me.

Floria
November 25th, 2014, 08:21 PM
F is for Fricka

Stephanie Blythe as Fricka

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Soave_Fanciulla
November 26th, 2014, 03:14 AM
F is for Falstaff,the 80-year-old Verdi's last composition, and only his second comedy, where he was able to create a seamless flow of inventive melody.

Here is THE Falstaff of the current period, whose appropriately mighty pancia is sustained by plenty of home-made risotto (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oj0CRbo5T-I).


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhEeWVMiLdw

Floria
November 26th, 2014, 01:37 PM
F is for La Fleur que tu m'avais jetee - Flower Song from Carmen

Soave_Fanciulla
November 26th, 2014, 05:34 PM
F is for Juan Diego Flórez, reigning bel canto tenor and cutest Tonio ever in La fille du régiment:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3aS6M8j3pvQ

Ann Lander (sospiro)
November 26th, 2014, 05:34 PM
F is for Juan Diego Flórez

Probably his most famous piece


http://youtu.be/bcHb2-TrUno

Soave_Fanciulla
November 26th, 2014, 05:54 PM
Great minds.....

Clayton
November 26th, 2014, 05:58 PM
:laugh4:

Ann Lander (sospiro)
November 26th, 2014, 06:32 PM
Great minds.....

Both timed at 5.34! (GMT)

Amfortas
November 26th, 2014, 11:08 PM
F is for Juan Diego Flórez . . .

Oh crap.

Clayton
November 27th, 2014, 10:04 PM
G is for Giulio Cesare,

or Giulio Cesare in Egitto, an opera in three acts by Handel catalogued as HWV 17 (there is also an opera by the same title composed by Sartorio but this post refers to Handel's opera) and premiered at King's Theatre London in 1724.

An opera with murder, conspiracy, treason, love, jealousy, a little of Handel's comedy and some of the best musical composition in operatic history, it is widely considered the best work of the composer and perhaps in opera.

There are many very fine recordings available which include but are not limited to:

5839 5840

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Obsessive fans may consider themselves a Cesareian. The question is: were you born a Cesareian?

Amfortas
November 28th, 2014, 03:30 AM
G, Clayton . . . G.

Don't disappoint me this time.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
November 28th, 2014, 05:09 AM
G is for maestro Valery Gergiev, General and Artistic Director of the Mariinsky Theater, and principal conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra. Maestro Gergiev conducted the first full Ring cycle in Russia after 90 years, was the principal guest conductor at the Met for 11 years, and most importantly... discovered Anna Netrebko! Thank you, maestro! Valery Gergiev, a native of Moscow, has recorded 24 complete operas, 19 of them being Russian operas. He has also recorded 8 ballets, 44 symphonic works, 8 symphonic works with vocal soloists, and 7 albums of vocal music. In addition to the above albums and CDs, Gergiev has 11 DVDs and 5 VHS, bringing his discography/videography to a total of 118 recordings to date! Impressive! He earned 60 awards and titles in Russia and abroad. What a career (and he is far from done)! I had the pleasure of meeting him briefly in person and chatting with him. The very bad picture below was taken that day.

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Floria
November 28th, 2014, 01:49 PM
G is for Umberto Giordano

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Umberto Menotti Maria Giordano (28 August 1867 – 12 November 1948) was an Italian composer.
Giordano's best known work is Andrea Chénier (1896), based on the life of the French poet André Chénier. Fedora (1898), based on Victorien Sardou's play, featured a rising young tenor named Enrico Caruso; it was also a success, and is still performed today. His later works are much less known, but occasionally revived and in the case of La cena delle beffe (based on the play of the same title by Sem Benelli) recognised by musicologists and critics with some respect. He died in Milan at the age of 81

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Clayton
November 28th, 2014, 02:38 PM
G, Clayton . . . G.

Don't disappoint me this time.

In the eloquent words of a dear poet friend..



Oh crap.

Soave_Fanciulla
November 28th, 2014, 08:43 PM
In the eloquent words of a dear poet friend..

Oforheavensake. Even I know who he's talking about.

Hint: clear as a bell, coloratura, still going strong past 60.

Floria
November 28th, 2014, 10:12 PM
Oforheavensake. Even I know who he's talking about.

Hint: clear as a bell, coloratura, still going strong past 60.

After Natalie's hint, I think I might know.:biggrin:

Ann Lander (sospiro)
November 29th, 2014, 06:29 AM
Oforheavensake. Even I know who he's talking about.

Hint: clear as a bell, coloratura, still going strong past 60.

And me! And I don't even like or have much knowledge of women singers!

Clayton
November 29th, 2014, 11:42 AM
Okay, sooo....

1. We are talking about Edita Gruberova :love_heart:

2. This is a conspiracy led by Amfortas to make Clayton feel stupid :sour:

3. Other :confused:


then...

1. I already posted under E :victorious:

2. No need; I've been pretending to be stupid all my life :p

3. rats.

Amfortas
November 29th, 2014, 04:21 PM
1. I already posted under E :victorious:

You can never have too much Edita! (or Gruberova, for that matter).

Clayton
November 29th, 2014, 05:29 PM
Okay, sooo....

1. We are talking about Edita Gruberova :love_heart:

2. This is a conspiracy led by Amfortas to make Clayton feel stupid :sour:

3. Other :confused:

...

and the answer is...


...Edita!

Phew!

MAuer
November 29th, 2014, 06:10 PM
G is for Reiner Goldberg, a leading Heldentenor of the late 20th century who is still performing the occasional bit part with the Berlin State Opera.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHwVjcq7ZI0

Ann Lander (sospiro)
November 29th, 2014, 06:25 PM
G is for Boris Godunov

Pimen's monologue


http://youtu.be/hWp-ZLnlF20

Clayton
November 29th, 2014, 09:51 PM
G is for Emanuela Galli,

and this week we are very honoured to have a very special post, courtesy of The Unofficial Emanuela Galli Fan Club, also known as The Emanuela Galli Greats (abbreviated to The EGG).

Here to make the very special presentation on behalf The EGG, I would like to present the chairman, Clayton.

Clayton:
Thank you very much, it is an honour to write here at the very respectable Opera Lively forum, where all the members are wonderful, intelligent and persons. [sic]
Emanuela Galli is a soprano, born in Milan and studied singing at The Conservatory of Music in Mantova. She has recorded many wonderful works.
Thank you.

Err.. Mr. Chairman, is that... well is that all?

Yes it is. I know no further information. However I do urge you to buy and listen to as many of her performances as possible. Sorry, I've got nothing more. Unfortunately, as she has no website, no press contact details or any other biography published and as mentioned this is the UNofficial fan club (we have NO restraining order). I have no further information.
I can add though, her Poppea has been cited (by at least the EGG) to have been the most beautiful ever recorded and her Cleopatra has equal status. This of course has elevated her to a Demi God status (in the eyes of the EGG) and whatever she does, her privacy is respected.

Some (but not all) of her recorded performances

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Clayton
November 29th, 2014, 10:07 PM
General information for those wishing to join the EGGs (The unofficial Emanuela Galli fan club):

Unfortunately we have no contact information for the fan club and so are unable to give you their details. Futhermore, there have been reports that this club has since been disbanded to form the Galli Interest Tribute club.
Again we are unable to confirm this as there are no details published for this establishment.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
November 30th, 2014, 04:35 AM
Ahem, Mr. Chairman. There *is* more.

------------

Emanuela Galli has collaborated with some ensembles and orchestras of Baroque music, such as the Cappella della Pietà dei Turchini, La Risonanza, Venexiana, Pian&Forte and La Fenice. She has participated in festivals and performed in the major Italian cities and abroad, among which are ''Música e Poesia'' of S. Maurizio in Milan, Festival Barroco of Pontoise, the Festival of Beaune, the Festival of Bruges, the Festival of Utrecht and the Festivals of Freiburg and Lugano. Beyond that, she has appeared at Theatre la Fenice in Venice, in Santiago de Compostela, in Barcelona, at the Konzerthaus of Vienna, the Konzerthaus of Berlin, and Lisbon at Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian.

Emanuela Galli has interpreted various roles of the repertoire of the Italian Baroque opera, being distinguished Erosmina in La Finta Cameriera by Gaetano Latilla, for the Teatro Petruzzelli in Bari, Cupido and Maria Madre in La Colomba Ferita by Francesco Provenzale, at the Theater San Carlo of Naples, Belluccia Mariano in Li Zite'n Galera by Leonardo Vinci, directed for Antonio Florio, and Alcina and Sirena in the opera-ballet of Francesco Caccini La Liberazione di Ruggiero dall'Isola di Alcinasob directed by Gabriel Garrido. In Teatro Massimo of Palermo she also participated, as a soloist, in Vespro della Beata Vergine by Claude Monteverdi.

-------------

Presto Classic has 21 of her CDs: [clicky (http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/a/-/3378/Emanuela-Galli/1)]

She is listed as singing next in Athens (L'Incoronazione di Poppea) and Santander (L'Orfeo).

------------

So, Clayton, what are you talking about? Who the hell doesn't know Emanuela Galli??? :mad5426:

Answer: Me. I had *never* heard of her until post # 203 above. :concern:

:biggrin:

Clayton
November 30th, 2014, 10:41 AM
...Emanuela Galli has collaborated with some ensembles and orchestras of Baroque music...

Thank you Captain for that post.

However, I have been quite spoilt by this forum and it's excellent in-depth interviews; I want more. To use the words of the OL interviewer, I want "to get to know the woman behind the artist". If you get to go to Athens, can you please arrange an interview with her?
Oh and please also pick up an autographeded photograph for me.

Thank you.

MAuer
November 30th, 2014, 12:31 PM
G is for Götterdämmerung. the fourth opera in Wagner's tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen. G is also for two of the characters in this opera, the siblings Günther and Gutrune, the children of King Gibich and his queen, Grimhild. Grimhild also gave birth to Hagen, the aforementioned Nibelung Alberich's son. And if those aren't enough "G" words, there is also Grane, the trusty steed of ex-Valkyrie Brünnhilde, who ends the opera by riding him into the flames of Siegfried's funeral pyre. (And wouldn't the folks from PETA like a word with her about that!)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0b/Brynhildr_by_Robert_Engels.jpg/330px-Brynhildr_by_Robert_Engels.jpg

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
November 30th, 2014, 04:52 PM
Thank you Captain for that post.

However, I have been quite spoilt by this forum and it's excellent in-depth interviews; I want more. To use the words of the OL interviewer, I want "to get to know the woman behind the artist". If you get to go to Athens, can you please arrange an interview with her?
Oh and please also pick up an autographeded photograph for me.

Thank you.
I would have done it, if you hadn't offended her by saying that there was no information available about her. This extremely well-known singer (cough cough except that I had no clue about her up to post #203 above cough cough) is so mad at Opera Lively now, that she indignantly said she won't grant us an interview. By the way, based on this, I had to cancel my first-class round trip to Athens which I had booked and paid for (cough cough I don't know where I put the receipt but you can trust me; I swear cough cough), and they refused to refund me the price of the ticket, quoting that the reason for the trip cancellation was Opera Lively's fault so the airline was not responsible for it. I'm sending a bill to your house for $50,000 which covers the tickets and my emotional distress with this cancelled interview with such a famous (cough cough unknown cough cough) singer! Please send payment at your earliest convenience.

Ann Lander (sospiro)
November 30th, 2014, 07:29 PM
G is for Verdi's Giovanna d'Arco


http://youtu.be/KqJwV-QmTH8

MAuer
December 1st, 2014, 12:24 PM
G is for the great 20th century Italian baritone Tito Gobbi, here in one of his "parade" roles as Baron Scarpia:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NfGQRbqOow

Clayton
December 1st, 2014, 03:45 PM
G is for The New Grove Dictionary of Opera,

a reference book for opera,

"A monument of enlightened scholarship."--Sunday Telegraph

"Written by an army of experts."--The Times

"Make no mistake: This will be the definitive reference work in opera for many, many years to come."--The Chicago Tribune

"All inquiries into Opera begin there from now on."--The San Francisco Examiner Chronicle

"...this work will significantly affect not only the way opera is enjoyed in the future, but the way it is made."--The Washington Post

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However it is very expensive, as a new set of the paperback will cost about GBP 195 and the paperback quality is not the sort of library book or collectors item quality but more like a very low cost school book. The hard back copies are being sold for about GBP 500 but there are many ex-library books available from about GBP 150. With hindsight, I wish I had purchased the ex-library books. The two copies I have seen in a library have been in excellent condition, are beautiful books and with so many unfortunate library closures, I am sure there are many in these treasured condition.
It was also last updated in 1992, which has missed twenty odd years of very fast paced opera rediscovery including a lot of baroque period opera.
That said, I probably have looked at it at least once a day since purchasing three months ago and though a lot of material can be found reproduced on the internet, there is much much more that has not.

Floria
December 1st, 2014, 08:23 PM
G is for Don Giovanni

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MAuer
December 2nd, 2014, 01:55 PM
G is for another great singer from the second half of the 20th century, the Swedish tenor Nicolai Gedda. Although very well known for his opera roles, he was also a noted recitalist, as this seasonally appropriate clip from a concert performance of Handel's Messiah illustrates:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3ZaoZPOoD0

Ann Lander (sospiro)
December 2nd, 2014, 05:28 PM
G is for Nicolai Ghiaurov. Ghiaurov was a Bulgarian bass and was married to Mirella Freni. He had a beautiful sumptuous voice which is well illustrated here.


http://youtu.be/yHuGuMvSiqM

Floria
December 2nd, 2014, 10:16 PM
G is for Angela Gheorghiu

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MAuer
December 3rd, 2014, 12:11 PM
G is for Christoph Willibald Gluck, 18th century composer of more than 40 operas (not including revisions of a number of them), and known for leading the Reform movement against the perceived excesses of the Baroque style.

http://www.naxos.com/SharedFiles/Images/Composers/Pictures/26064-1.jpg

MAuer
December 4th, 2014, 12:10 PM
Mustn't forget another one of opera's "G-men," Charles Gounod. Of the more than 10 operas he composed, Faust and Roméo et Juliette have become repertoire staples.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6d/Charles_Gounod.jpg

Hoffmann
December 5th, 2014, 04:34 PM
G is for German opera houses.

I'm going out on a limb here, but Germany probably is the last of the great powerhouses in the operatic world as a nation that still can afford to subsidize the arts in a meaningful way. There have been some cutbacks, of course, but local governments still provide enormous financial support to their opera companies in a way that would be overwhelmingly unpopular in the U.S. Other nations in the E.U. also provide heavy subsidies to their opera houses, but with economies struggling, have not been able to maintain the same level of support found in Germany.

Not to mention that German opera houses also tend to play to full or nearly full houses on a regular basis!

Ann Lander (sospiro)
December 5th, 2014, 05:06 PM
G is for German opera houses.

I'm going out on a limb here, but Germany probably is the last of the great powerhouses in the operatic world as a nation that still can afford to subsidize the arts in a meaningful way. There have been some cutbacks, of course, but local governments still provide enormous financial support to their opera companies in a way that would be overwhelmingly unpopular in the U.S. Other nations in the E.U. also provide heavy subsidies to their opera houses, but with economies struggling, have not been able to maintain the same level of support found in Germany.

Not to mention that German opera houses also tend to play to full or nearly full houses on a regular basis!

We're very lucky in Europe but even quite small towns in Germany have an opera house. And if you want to sing opera, as this article (http://www.newsweek.com/2014/07/25/if-you-want-sing-opera-learn-german-259368.html) says, 'Learn German'

Clayton
December 5th, 2014, 05:07 PM
G is for Gianandrea Gavazzeni,

Italian conductor, composer and writer, 27 July 1909 - 5 February 1996. He studied at the Accademia di Santa Cecilia and Milan Conservatory. He was associated with La Scala from 1948 and was artistic director 1965 - 1968.

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Clayton
December 9th, 2014, 10:53 AM
H is for Victor Marie Hugo,

a French author, 26 Feb 1802 - 22 May 1885. One of France's greatest, he was awarded the Légion d'honneur, elected to the Académie Française and made a Peer of France.

His works inspired many operas including Lucrezia Borgia, Ernani and Rigoletto.

5944

5945
Via Victor Hugo, Milan, is just around the corner from the delicious Peck delicatessen. A must go to spot in Milan.

MAuer
December 9th, 2014, 12:00 PM
H is for Jacques-François-Fromental Halévy, who composed around 40 operas, of which La Juive is the best known.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/08/Fromental_Halevy_by_Etienne_Carjat-crop.jpg/330px-Fromental_Halevy_by_Etienne_Carjat-crop.jpg

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
December 9th, 2014, 12:18 PM
H is for Barbara Hannigan, awesome soprano with a huge range, and a talented multi-tasking lady who sings, acts, plays the piano, dances, and conducts, not to forget that she is very pretty.

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Clayton
December 9th, 2014, 09:59 PM
H is for Ernst Haefliger,

a Swiss tenor, 6 July 1919 - 17 March 2007 who I first heard today in the Ferenc Fricsay's recording of Don Giovanni. Haefliger was a protégé of Fricsay and performed amongst others in all his Mozart productions. He has (had) a very thin and pure voice which is something almost astounding. I shall be further investigating his works.

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*I do not think this is technically the correct descriptive but I mean his voice is like silk (again this might not be a correct musical adjective...)

Soave_Fanciulla
December 10th, 2014, 03:27 AM
H is for Humperdinck's Hänsel und Gretel, a perfect introduction to opera for children, with magic and melodies and a good come-uppance for the wicked witch, here interpreted with great gusto by the late lamented Philip Langridge:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1elUvZauBk

MAuer
December 10th, 2014, 12:05 PM
H is for the baritone Dietrich Henschel, whose roster of opera roles extends from Monteverdi to Berg (and beyond), and who is also a noted Lied interpreter and concert performer. Here he is as Beckmesser:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWn6k4pzsIo

Soave_Fanciulla
December 10th, 2014, 06:32 PM
H is for the baritone Dietrich Henschel, whose roster of opera roles extends from Monteverdi to Berg (and beyond), and who is also a noted Lied interpreter and concert performer. Here he is as Beckmesser:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWn6k4pzsIo

Hmm. Beckmesser channelling Snape. Nice.

Floria
December 10th, 2014, 10:54 PM
H is for Marilyn Horne

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Ann Lander (sospiro)
December 11th, 2014, 04:56 AM
H is for Dmitri Hvorostovsky, a Russian baritone known as the silver fox and seen here with Anna Netrebko.

http://91.215.216.77/media/upload/gallery/movies/431790.jpg

Here singing the beautiful aria Il balen del suo soriso from Verdi's Il trovatore


http://youtu.be/9TOYKHcwFH4

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
December 11th, 2014, 06:25 AM
Here singing the beautiful aria Il balen del suo soriso from Verdi's Il trovatore


Well, as long as José Cura doesn't get any close, I'm fine with him!

:shoced:

MAuer
December 11th, 2014, 12:04 PM
H is for the Greco-German soprano Anja Harteros, one of today's leading ladies in the lirico-spinto/jugendlich-dramatische Fach. (Can't wait for her recording of Aida next year!)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfW62QK7Jfk

Floria
December 19th, 2014, 10:27 PM
H is for Jerry Hadley.

Jerry Hadley (June 16, 1952 – July 18, 2007) was an American operatic tenor. He received three Grammy awards for his vocal performances in the recordings of Jenůfa (2004 Grammy Award for Best Opera Recording), Susannah (1995 Grammy Award for Best Opera Recording), and Candide (1992 Grammy Award for Best Classical Album). Hadley was a leading American tenor for nearly two decades.[1] He was a protégé of soprano Dame Joan Sutherland and her husband, conductor Richard Bonynge. A versatile singer, Hadley was equally at home in opera and operetta and on Broadway.

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Amfortas
December 19th, 2014, 10:44 PM
H is for Jerry Hadley.

In January of 2008 I attended a memorial concert tribute to Hadley here in Champaign-Urbana at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts--where the tenor, a University of Illinois alumnus, made his debut. His friends and colleagues Elizabeth Futral, Frederica von Stade , Richard Leech, Thomas Hampson, and Samuel Ramey all took part in a memorable evening of song and touching, often funny reminiscences, culminating in a choral performance of “Let Our Garden Grow” from Bernstein's Candide that incorporated video footage of Hadley himself singing the title role.

A talented singer and actor who passed away far too soon.

Soave_Fanciulla
December 20th, 2014, 08:27 AM
In January of 2008 I attended a memorial concert tribute to Hadley here in Champaign-Urbana at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts--where the tenor, a University of Illinois alumnus, made his debut. His friends and colleagues Elizabeth Futral, Frederica von Stade , Richard Leech, Thomas Hampson, and Samuel Ramey all took part in a memorable evening of song and touching, often funny reminiscences, culminating in a choral performance of “Let Our Garden Grow” from Bernstein's Candide that incorporated video footage of Hadley himself singing the title role.

A talented singer and actor who passed away far too soon.

I just want to add:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51yrBNbWKmL.jpg

Clayton
December 20th, 2014, 09:20 PM
I is for Les Indes galantes

an opéra-ballet by Jean-Philippe Rameau premièred at the Théâtre du Palais-Royal in Paris on 23 August 1735. It is one of his most well known and perhaps most popular works, consisting of a prologue and four entrées. However the first performance had only two, and the perfectionist Rameau produced many further revisions with no less than seventeen autographed scores.

One day the world (Clayton's predictor model) will celebrate "mo' Rameau" day, probably on the 22nd September; all the world will have a holiday and all the principal broadcasters in each nation will broadcast the William Christie show. There will be no more war blah, blah, blah...
Seriously, go buy this DVD now!

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Hoffmann
December 20th, 2014, 10:54 PM
I is for Il

Il Pirata

plus

Il Barbiere di Siviglia
Il Turco in Italia
Il Viaggio A Reims

Not to mention:

Il Matrimonio Segreto

and

Il Corsaro
Il Trovatore

and probably some others ...

Hoffmann
December 20th, 2014, 10:59 PM
I also is for .. I

I Puritani
I Capuleti e i Montecchi

and

I Due Foscari
I Masnadieri
I Lombardi

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
December 20th, 2014, 11:29 PM
I is for Ildar Abdrazakov, Opera Lively interviewee and amazing bass with many roles at the Met, most notably the recent Prince Igor, and the very successful recent Le Nozze di Figaro, here with the lovely Marlis Petersen:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPkQP2gwyzM

MAuer
December 21st, 2014, 12:21 PM
I is for Mozart's Idomeneo, and for Idomeneo's son Idamante and Idamante's (eventual) bride, Ilia. Over the course of his career, tenor Francisco Araiza sang the roles of both Idomeneo and Idamante (Mozart having sensibly rewritten the latter role for a tenor :biggrin:). This clip has him singing the very difficult original version of Idomeneo's aria "Fuor del mar."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ezYAJcn7bM

Floria
December 21st, 2014, 03:08 PM
I is for Isabel Leonard

Isabel Leonard (born 1982) is an American lyric mezzo-soprano. She is of Argentinean ancestry on her mother's side.

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Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
December 21st, 2014, 04:41 PM
I is for Isabel Leonard

Isabel Leonard (born 1982) is an American lyric mezzo-soprano. She is of Argentinean ancestry on her mother's side.

6132

And let's not forget, the lovely Isabel granted two interviews to Opera Lively! If you click on her main one in the Home page, there is a link there for her second one.

Ann Lander (sospiro)
December 21st, 2014, 04:50 PM
I is for Mozart's Idomeneo, and for Idomeneo's son Idamante and Idamante's (eventual) bride, Ilia. Over the course of his career, tenor Francisco Araiza sang the roles of both Idomeneo and Idamante (Mozart having sensibly rewritten the latter role for a tenor :biggrin:). This clip has him singing the very difficult original version of Idomeneo's aria "Fuor del mar."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ezYAJcn7bM

Oooh! Thank you! More useful info for my Idomeneo homework.

Floria
December 21st, 2014, 06:50 PM
I is for Iolanta
Iolanta, (Russian: Иоланта) is a lyric opera in one act by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, his last. The libretto was written by the composer's brother Modest Tchaikovsky, and is based on the Danish play Kong Renés Datter (King René’s Daughter) by Henrik Hertz, a romanticised account of the life of Yolande de Bar. In the original Danish play, the spelling of the princess's name was "Iolanthe", which was a cause of confusion with the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta of that name.[1] The play was translated by Fyodor Miller and adapted by Vladimir Zotov. The opera received its premiere on 18 December 1892 in St. Petersburg.

6135

Clayton
December 21st, 2014, 07:06 PM
Nice post

This has just gone into my shopping basket

Tchaikovsky: Iolanta
Anna Netrebko (Iolanta), Sergey Skorokhodov (Vaudémont), Monika Bohinec (Martha), Jun Ho You (Almerik), Lucas Meachem (Robert, Duke of Burgundy), Vitalij Kowaljow (René), Luka Debevec Mayer (Bertrand), Nuška Rojko (Laura), Theresa Plut (Brigitte), Vladislav Sulimski (Ibn Haki)
Slovenian Philharmonic Orchestra, Emmanuel Villaume
£17.50

Scheduled for release on 5 January 2015

6136

MAuer
December 22nd, 2014, 11:50 AM
I is for the tenor Robert Ilosfalvy, a mainstay of the Hungarian State Opera in the latter half of the 20th century who also appeared at a number of leading opera houses in the West (back in the days of the Iron Curtain).


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gdxieh9ZT9k

Floria
December 22nd, 2014, 01:25 PM
I is for Tristan and Isolde

6137

Floria
December 23rd, 2014, 02:09 PM
I is for Mascangni'sIris

Iris is an opera in three acts by Pietro Mascagni to an original Italian libretto by Luigi Illica. It premiered on 22 November 1898 at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome. The story is set in Japan during legendary times.

The opera has three wonderful arias which span during the acts: the first is the well known tenor's serenade Apri la tua finestra (Open your windows), the second is the chorus number Inno al Sole (Hymn to the Sun) and the last one is the so-called "aria de la piovra" (Octopus aria): Un dì, ero piccina. In this last aria, Iris depicts a screen she had seen in a Buddhist temple, in her chilhood: an octopus coiling with tentacles around a young women

The so-called "aria della piovra" ("Octopus aria"), "Un dì, ero piccina", where Iris describes a screen she had seen in a Buddhist temple when she was a child, depicting an octopus coiling with its tentacles around a young woman, may have been inspired by the print "The Dream of the Fisherman's Wife" (1814) by the Japanese artist Hokusai.

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Clayton
December 24th, 2014, 04:13 PM
another (very good) recording

6164

Ilona Tokody (Iris), Placido Domingo (Osaka), Juan Pons (Kyoto), Bonaldo Giaiotti (Il Cieco), Gabriella Ferroni (Dhia), Conchita Antuñano (Geisha), Sergio Tedesco (Il Cenciaiuolo), Heinrich Weber (Un Cenciaiuolo, Un Merciaiuolo)
Chor Des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Münchner Rundfunkorchester
Giuseppe Patané
Studio recording (Studio One, Bayerischer Rundfunk) 1988

MAuer
December 27th, 2014, 06:36 PM
I is for Gluck's operas Iphigénie en Aulide and Iphigénie en Tauride, two of several works dealing with the Iphigenia myth (who was -- or wasn't -- sacrificed by her father Agamemnon to enable the Greek fleet to set off for war with Troy).

From the latter opera, Carol Vaness sings the leading lady's aria, "Ô malheureuse Iphigénie."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u3H8-bnYtE0

Clayton
December 27th, 2014, 10:59 PM
I is for Irina Arkhipova

a Russian mezzo-soprano (1925-2010), graduate of Moscow Institute of Architecture and Moscow conservatory.

6172

An absolutely delicious voice that came I first heard as Lel/Spring in Rimsky-Korsakov's Snegurochka or the Snow Maiden (second favourite Rimsky-Korsakov opera) 1976 Vladimir Fedoseyev's recording with Moscow Radio. The other recording I have is The Tsar's Bride (third favourite), where she sings the role of Lyubasha (1975 Fuat Mansurov recording with Bolshoi opera). A melt the heart voice with warmth and humanity that contibutes significantly to these wonderful recordings.

6173 6174

Clayton
December 28th, 2014, 06:48 PM
I is for Italian Opera Houses

some pictures of a random selection

61776178
La Fenice, Venezia

61796180
Teatro comunale di Bologna

61816182
Teatro Lirico Giuseppe Verdi, Trieste

61836184
Teatro dell'Opera di Roma

61856186
Teatro di San Carlo, Napoli

- - - Updated - - -

and still no tickets to any performance for Clayton...

MAuer
December 29th, 2014, 02:18 PM
I is for the Georgian soprano Tamar Iveri, who found herself in a whole lot of hot water earlier this year when a virulently anti-gay letter directed to the President of Georgia appeared on her Facebook page in May, 2013. After she was canned by Opera Australia this past summer, she tried to do damage control by claiming it was actually her husband who was responsible for the objectionable post, and then gave a concert in Tblisi benefitting gay/lesbian organizations in the country. Whether her international career has been permanently damaged by this incident remains to be seen.

http://www.independent.co.uk/incoming/article9555825.ece/alternates/w620/v2-tamar-iveri-facebook.jpg

Floria
December 29th, 2014, 03:16 PM
I is for Ingvar Wixell (7th May, 1931 - 8th October, 2011)

6192

Ingvar Wixell was a Swedish opera singer who was greatly appreciated for his baritone. His repertoire included roles such as, Rigoletto, Amonasro from Aida, baritone roles of Mozart such as Don Giovanni, Le Nozze di Figaro's Count Almaviva, Eugene Onegin by Tchaikovsky, and Germont from La Traviata.

He made his operatic debut at the Swedish Royal Opera in 1955, wherein he performed as Papageno from The Magic Flute by Mozart. He made his debut at the London, Royal Opera in 1960 and played the title role of Simon Boccanegra by Giuseppe Verdi. He performed in America in 1967 at the San Francisco Opera and performed as Belcore from L'elisir d'amore by Donizetti. In the same year, he was engaged by The Deutsche Oper Berlin where he continued to perform for the next three decades. In 1973, he had arrived at the Metropolitan Opera, where he performed the tile role of Rigoletto by Verdi. He performed for six seasons with the Metropolitan Opera.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
December 29th, 2014, 07:04 PM
I is for the Georgian soprano Tamar Iveri, who found herself in a whole lot of hot water earlier this year when a virulently anti-gay letter directed to the President of Georgia appeared on her Facebook page in May, 2013. After she was canned by Opera Australia this past summer, she tried to do damage control by claiming it was actually her husband who was responsible for the objectionable post, and then gave a concert in Tblisi benefitting gay/lesbian organizations in the country. Whether her international career has been permanently damaged by this incident remains to be seen.

http://www.independent.co.uk/incoming/article9555825.ece/alternates/w620/v2-tamar-iveri-facebook.jpg

What did she do regarding her husband? Does she need a new husband? Given her nice looks maybe there will be candidates. Our good Amfortas has mentioned that if he gets to interview nice-looking sopranos, the interview might end in a marriage proposal, so maybe we should send him to Georgia to interview Ms. Iveri, which might solve Amfortas' need for a wife, and Ms. Iveri's need for a non-gay-hating husband in order to restart her career.
-------
I got curious and looked it all up. La Monnaie has dropped her from their 2015 Ballo as well (and previously Opéra National de Paris had done it too), and her "upcoming schedule" has nothing beyond the Opera Australia Otello in Sidney and Tosca in Melbourne, and neither one was upheld by the company, so, I guess at this point she is unemployed. It also looks like she only claimed her husband's authorship several months into the controversy and he never quite confirmed that he was indeed the author of the post, so... it does seem suspicious. "However, in an interview in September last year, she defended the letter, didn’t deny writing it, and added that her husband supported her views." Also, the excuse she initially gave for writing the letter, that is, that she was merely concerned about possible violence given that a gay parade had been scheduled for the same day a religious orthodox event was happening in the same neighborhood, has been debunked as a fabrication, since the two events happened in separate days.

I've read the full letter (two and a half pages) and it is indeed a bigoted rambling mess. So, career suicide...
-------
OK, Amfortas, maybe you shouldn't marry her, after all. :sour:
-------
She was at the Met in 2008 in La Clemenza di Tito in the role of Vitellia, with Susan Graham and Ramon Vargas.

Amfortas
December 29th, 2014, 07:55 PM
OK, Amfortas, maybe you shouldn't marry her, after all. :sour:

Thank you for clearing that up.

Clayton
December 29th, 2014, 11:04 PM
J is for Le Jongleur de Notre-Dame

the 26th opera written by Jules Émile Frédéric Massenet (1842-1912) which had its premiere at the Monte Carlo Opéra 18 February 1902. It is called a Miracle in 3 acts and written to a libretto by Maurice Léna based on a medieval legend.

Very simply it is a tale of a poor starving juggler in the 14th century who finds refuge in the Abbey of Cluny on the suggestion of the Prior. Jean the Juggler seeks advice from Boniface, the monastery cook and consequently finds enlightenment though juggling (himself to death). The story may sound weak in my very brief account (actually there is not really much more to it) but told through this music is quite profound. The music that carries the story is much greater than that though and is rich but not overpowering, with hints of sacred music and light comic story telling that is wonderful.

It is my favoutite Massenet opera and apparently was his too.

"J’écris une pièce, unde légende, un conte en musique, appelez-le
Comme vous voudrez, où il n’y a pas un seul role de femme!
Pas un, entendez-vous, pas le plus petit role de femme…
J’approche de la fin, et depuis quelques jours, je sens, je sais
à coup sûr que Le Jongleur de Notre-Dame sera mon chef-d’oeuvre"
Jules Massenet

There is a very good recording (live but very good sound and no distracting noise) on DG with Alagna, in his finest form

Massenet: Le Jongleur de Notre-Dame
Roberto Alagna, Stefano Antonucci & Francesco Ellero d’Artegna
Orchestre National de Montpellier Languedoc Roussillon, Enrique Diemecke
Recorded February 2007 at Montpellier

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Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
December 29th, 2014, 11:45 PM
où il n’y a pas un seul role de femme!
Pas un, entendez-vous, pas le plus petit role de femme…

All right, not for me, then! :dejection:

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
December 29th, 2014, 11:46 PM
Thank you for clearing that up.
Anytime! See how I look after you? :biggrin:

Floria
December 30th, 2014, 02:43 AM
J is for Jussi Bjorling, one of my all time favorites.

6204

Jussi Björling (5 February 1911 – 9 September 1960) was a Swedish tenor and one of most highly regarded opera singers of the 20th century. Björling was one of the few non-Latin tenors to rival the Italian dominance of the opera world at that time.

Björling was born in Borlänge. He studied singing with his father, David, an accomplished vocalist, and made his debut public appearance at the age of four with the Björling Male Quartet. The group performed in concerts throughout Sweden and the United States for eleven and a half years.

Björling made his professional operatic debut as the Lamplighter in Manon Lescaut at the Royal Swedish Opera in Stockholm in 1930. This was soon followed by Don Ottavio in Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Arnoldo in Rossini’s William Tell and Almaviva in Rossini’s The Barber of Seville. This in turn led to engagements in Europe and the USA. Björling made his American concert debut in Carnegie Hall in 1937; the following year, he made his debut at the Metropolitan Opera as Rodolfo in La bohème.

The best recording of La Boheme, Jussi Bjorling, Victoria De Los Angelas, Sir Thomas Beecham

MAuer
December 30th, 2014, 12:47 PM
J is for Siegfried Jerusalem, once described by Matthew Gurewitsch in The New York Times as being "in a paradoxical class of his own" -- the real lyric Heldentenor. A regular at the Bayreuth Festival for more than 20 years, he actually started out as a bassoonist before beginning a singing career in his mid-30s, and had a repertoire that extended from Mozart's Tamino and Idomeneo all the way to Wagner's Siegfried and Tristan. Since the early 2000s, he has been a professor of voice at Nürnberg’s Music University, where he also served as Rector/President for about 10 years. This clip shows him early in his career in a concert gala at the Vienna State Opera.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZDOU2O7FPY

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
December 30th, 2014, 05:20 PM
J is for Jenůfa, one of Leoš Janáček's many astounding masterpieces. Actually the opera's real name is Její pastorkyňa which translates as Her Stepdaughter but fortunately also qualifies as J... It became known in the West by the main character's name.

It can be seen complete on YouTube with English subtitles and a very good cast, featuring Nina Stemme and Eva Morton, at the Liceu:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFbRCiChA1g

Amfortas
December 30th, 2014, 06:30 PM
J is for Eugen Jochum (1902 - 1987), the eminent German conductor famous for his recordings of the Bruckner symphonies, and perhaps best known to opera enthusiasts for his Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg featuring Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau and Plácido Domingo.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/db/Eugen_Jochum_.jpg

Soave_Fanciulla
December 31st, 2014, 02:23 AM
J is for Le Jongleur de Notre-Dame

the 26th opera written by Jules Émile Frédéric Massenet (1842-1912) which had its premiere at the Monte Carlo Opéra 18 February 1902. It is called a Miracle in 3 acts and written to a libretto by Maurice Léna based on a medieval legend.

Very simply it is a tale of a poor starving juggler in the 14th century who finds refuge in the Abbey of Cluny on the suggestion of the Prior. Jean the Juggler seeks advice from Boniface, the monastery cook and consequently finds enlightenment though juggling (himself to death). The story may sound weak in my very brief account (actually there is not really much more to it) but told through this music is quite profound. The music that carries the story is much greater than that though and is rich but not overpowering, with hints of sacred music and light comic story telling that is wonderful.

It is my favoutite Massenet opera and apparently was his too.



I saw an interview on Forumopera with Roberto Alagna and he said it was his favourite Massenet opera too (he also spent a fair bit of time complaining that Massenet had written Athanaël in Thaïs for baritone rather than tenor, but that's another story..)

Amfortas
December 31st, 2014, 04:19 PM
J is for Le Jongleur de Notre-Dame . . .

Very simply it is a tale of a poor starving juggler in the 14th century who finds refuge in the Abbey of Cluny on the suggestion of the Prior. Jean the Juggler seeks advice from Boniface, the monastery cook and consequently finds enlightenment though juggling (himself to death). The story may sound weak in my very brief account (actually there is not really much more to it) . . .

Isn't the point of the story that God (or in this case, the Virgin Mary) accepts our offerings, no matter how inappropriate they may seem, provided they are given with a sincere heart?

I've heard the story applied to Verdi's Requiem: religious music very much carrying the taint of the opera house, but nonetheless overwhelming in its passionate sincerity.

Clayton
December 31st, 2014, 04:25 PM
Isn't the point of the story that God (or in this case, the Virgin Mary) accepts our offerings, no matter how inappropriate they may seem, provided they are given with a sincere heart?...

Yes I think so, Jean understands this once Boniface explains to him that is doesn't matter if it's reading poetry in Latin or writing songs like the other clever monks. It's the with this purity of thought that Jean sees the light

MAuer
January 1st, 2015, 12:05 PM
J is for the Polish conductor Marek Janowski, who has led performances at many of the world's top opera houses and made a number of opera recordings, including two complete Ring cycles -- one with the Dresden Staatskapelle in the early 1980s for RCA, and the other within the last few years on Pentatone Classics with the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra.

http://www.cami.com/images/banner/236.jpg

Amfortas
January 1st, 2015, 05:43 PM
Not to be confused with J for the Russian conductor Vladimir Jurowski, until recently Music Director of the Glyndebourne Festival Opera (he's featured on the excellent DVD of David McVicar's Meistersinger production) and now Principal Conductor of the London Philharmonic Orchestra.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b1/Vladimir_Jurowski_2.jpg