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Clayton
December 24th, 2014, 02:24 PM
Listening to the William Christie Messiah

The cover is a part depiction of the painting Resurrection (1518) by Albrecht Altdorfer c1480-1538, a German painter of the Danube school.

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another of his well known works is The Battle of Alexander at Issus (1529), showing the scene of Alexander the Great's victory against Darius, the King of Persia 333BC

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Which covers do you like?

Ann Lander (sospiro)
December 24th, 2014, 04:31 PM
Cool thread!

I love the EMI covers. A couple of my favourites.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41g-HhA5ngL._SX450_PJautoripBadge,BottomRight,4,-40_OU11__.jpg

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51zOGPQa3hL._SX425_.jpg

Clayton
December 24th, 2014, 05:12 PM
I also have been listening ALOT to Rinaldo Alessandrini's Monteverdi's vespers (off topic but stormed up the Clayton charts to one of favourite CD, next to GC and ICDP - GET IT)

The cover is part of Vittore Carpaccio's The Lion of St Mark in the Doge's Palace, Venice (1516) although facing the wrong way. Carpaccio (1465-1525) was an Italian painter of the Venetian school.

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another of his well known pieces is The flight into Egypt (1500)

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Clayton
December 24th, 2014, 07:13 PM
just one more for now (whilst feeling like I'm posting too much blah, blah blah)

Alan Curtis' Giulio Cesare

I can't attribute this to a specific artist, only that I know the actual piece is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York). The cover is beautiful yet powerful, physical strength and legal power. It also tells me that the producers think this is really a special work.

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I don't think this is a Roman piece of armour but probably medieval Europe and a dress piece (armour for show rather than fighting). Like the Glyndebourne production with the red tunics, it's a symbol.

Dark_Angel
December 27th, 2014, 10:26 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51qgkyBvuZL._SX425_.jpg

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/512WZ42C77L.jpg

All of the Naïve label Vivaldi series are very original and striking, the Renee Jacobs Mozart series are decadently deluxe looking boxsets

Dark_Angel
December 27th, 2014, 10:42 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51SqZTh5iUL.jpg

Renee Fleming wearing an iconic original dress design for MET Thais, visually striking


http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41nobwRLPVL.jpg

A striking visual cover for best baroque opera production I have ever seen on video......

Clayton
December 27th, 2014, 11:29 PM
The LIG cover has such good composition

(or balance)

Clayton
December 28th, 2014, 08:14 PM
A contender for revival/rediscovered work of the year, La Clemenza di Tito

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uses a picture by Giovanni Paolo Panini (A Capriccio of the Roman Forum 1741), a painter and architect from Rome (1691-1765) who did many studies of sites in and around Rome of historical importance.

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Clayton
December 28th, 2014, 10:40 PM
Another very good cover, again Gluck (guess which operas I haven't been posting on the listening thread), this time from the label Harmonia Mundi but on the lower price range collection (though with no effort spared on a good presentation)

The cover for Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice uses part of the painting by Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, a French neo-classical artist 1796-1875, of whom Monet once referenced "There is only one master here—Corot. We are nothing compared to him, nothing".

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Orphée ramenant Eurydice des enfers 1861

The pathetic figures of the two are as romantic as the drama requires

Donizetti fans may recognize another of Corot's works

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1860-1870 - La Femme à la perle

Soave_Fanciulla
December 29th, 2014, 04:14 AM
Another very good cover, again Gluck (guess which operas I haven't been posting on the listening thread), this time from the label Harmonia Mundi but on the lower price range collection (though with no effort spared on a good presentation)

The cover for Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice uses part of the painting by Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, a French neo-classical artist 1796-1875, of whom Monet once referenced "There is only one master here—Corot. We are nothing compared to him, nothing".

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Orphée ramenant Eurydice des enfers 1861

The pathetic figures of the two are as romantic as the drama requires


I really love this one.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
December 29th, 2014, 12:10 PM
How do you find these things, Clayton? Is there mention of what the painting is, or you just have encyclopedic knowledge of paintings?

Clayton
December 29th, 2014, 01:05 PM
More often than not, there is a mention of where the cover art comes from and where it is kept. I read through all the printed material to get to know all I can about the CDs and how they are produced.

Then I have been looking up on the interweb about the paintings and artists. There are lots of sites about paintings that are very interesting so I thought I would like to import a bit of that magic in to this forum.

I do not have an encyclopedic knowledge. I have the memory function of a juvenile ring-tailed lemur. that fell out of tree. and hit its head. hard. twice.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
December 29th, 2014, 06:54 PM
I do not have an encyclopedic knowledge. I have the memory function of a juvenile ring-tailed lemur. that fell out of tree. and hit its head. hard. twice.

OK. Now I have to find a juvenile ring-tailed lemur that fell out of the three and hit his head hard twice and submit him to some memory testing, so that I understand what I'm dealing with. I'd like to make it clear for the intention of PETA and the Humane Society in advance that no animal will be harmed while I try to figure out what Clayton's memory is like, since I wouldn't throw a juvenile ring-tailed lemur twice from a three in order to complete this experiment. I just need to find one that has done it on his own, twice. It shouldn't be difficult, I guess.

[Alma types ad for Craig List, asking for juvenile ring-tailed lemurs known for sloppy behavior when they climb trees]

[Alma consults the archives of Animal Psychology Today to find out what is the best memory test which is appropriate for juvenile ring-tailed lemurs]

[After much browsing, Alma sighs in realization that this might take longer than expected]

Hoffmann
December 29th, 2014, 10:34 PM
OK. Now I have to find a juvenile ring-tailed lemur that fell out of the three and hit his head hard twice and submit him to some memory testing, so that I understand what I'm dealing with. I'd like to make it clear for the intention of PETA and the Humane Society in advance that no animal will be harmed while I try to figure out what Clayton's memory is like, since I wouldn't throw a juvenile ring-tailed lemur twice from a three in order to complete this experiment. I just need to find one that has done it on his own, twice. It shouldn't be difficult, I guess.

[Alma types ad for Craig List, asking for juvenile ring-tailed lemurs known for sloppy behavior when they climb trees]

[Alma consults the archives of Animal Psychology Today to find out what is the best memory test which is appropriate for juvenile ring-tailed lemurs]

[After much browsing, Alma sighs in realization that this might take longer than expected]


Maybe just start with an empirical analysis of Clayton's posts over the past year and look for a patterns...
It might explain his all-consuming taste for things Baroque:

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Of course, there's always:

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Clayton
December 29th, 2014, 10:45 PM
That is not my candelabrum. It was only included in the picture on the insistance of the stylist.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
December 30th, 2014, 12:01 AM
That is not my candelabrum. It was only included in the picture on the insistance of the stylist.
Nah! From my research with juvenile ring-tailed lemurs that fell from a tree on their head, hard, twice -- which indeed has advanced quite a lot since I last posted thanks to Craig List and to a nice article I finally found in the archives of Animal Psychology Today, I've concluded that this is indeed your candelabrum. You just forgot that you bought it. My lemur was particularly bad at recalling any candelabra, which of course are prominent items in the memory tests I got from the professional journal.

It's actually fascinating research. The conclusions I've reached are almost worth the effort, if not for the fact that the darn lemur bit my hand, hard, twice, and now I'm having a lot of trouble typing. I don't want to conclude yet from this event that you also bite people's hands, but until further research I wouldn't get too close to you.

Clayton
January 1st, 2015, 07:06 PM
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I have nothing intelligent to say (said Clayton) about this cover, I just think it's pretty and I like it

Clayton
January 1st, 2015, 07:12 PM
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ditto explanation

Dark_Angel
January 2nd, 2015, 02:51 AM
SLG reminded me that Netrebko does have some nice CD covers.......

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51fVT-9byCL._SX425_.jpg http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Iiw8f3D7L._SX425_.jpg

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81iLcZ-JtaL._SX425_.jpg

JohnGerald
January 2nd, 2015, 04:09 AM
What's a lemur?

Can it be grilled?

And I trust that "PETA" is the acronym for "People Eating Tasty Animals" ....

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
January 2nd, 2015, 04:50 AM
What's a lemur?
The ring-tailed lemur is the species Lemur catta, a member of the Lemuridae family, which are Strepsirrhini primates. I hope this clears any doubts.

Operatic link: they're from Madagascar. Just like L'Africaine, if you accept the notion that she is from there.


Can it be grilled?
It sure can.

Here: [clicky (http://www.organicauthority.com/blog/organic/madagascars-wild-lemurs-feed-nations-hungry/)]


And I trust that "PETA" is the acronym for "People Eating Tasty Animals" ....
You almost got it right, if you believe that eating them is akin to ethically treating them. In the case of tasty confit de canard which I actually had today cooked by the Countess, I couldn't agree more.

JohnGerald
January 2nd, 2015, 07:05 PM
I'll pass on cannibalism, but duck confit is the ultimate proof that God loves us. That and good wine, And opera. and ... and ...

Amfortas
January 2nd, 2015, 11:31 PM
censored

Amfortas hovers over the button, agonizing over whether to report this post.

But to whom? :dejection:

Oh well . . . at least he didn't actually recommend grilling the baby.

JohnGerald
January 3rd, 2015, 12:15 AM
Amfortas hovers over the button, agonizing over whether to report this post.

But to whom? :dejection:

Oh well . . . at least he didn't actually recommend grilling the baby.

But the serious question is whether he would refuse a portion if someone else did? Like a nice veal saltimbocca?

Soave_Fanciulla
January 3rd, 2015, 02:33 AM
censored

You are. utterly. incorrigible.

JohnGerald
January 3rd, 2015, 03:58 AM
censored

Good Lord!! For one of the few times in my life, I am without words ... unless they are

RUN!!!

HIDE!!!

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
January 3rd, 2015, 05:32 AM
OK, I think I... erm... went a bit too far. So, I self-censored. :culpability:

Soave_Fanciulla
January 3rd, 2015, 06:06 AM
OK, I think I... erm... went a bit too far. So, I self-censored. :culpability:

I was joking you know:kiss.1:

MAuer
January 3rd, 2015, 01:09 PM
Naturally, I like any album cover adorned by the image of the gorgeous Jonas. :biggrin:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81wZ4qggAUL._SX522_.jpg

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
January 3rd, 2015, 06:04 PM
I was joking you know:kiss.1:
I know, but sometimes I worry. My running jokes about cough cough assets cough cough are one thing, internally, but when they get to the front page side by side with our interviews (there are no fewer than 6 transcribed, awaiting revision for publication - Christmas break, all the agents seem to be away), maybe our interviewees will think Opera Lively is not a serious operation... Sometimes I think I should tone down a little...

JohnGerald
January 3rd, 2015, 08:26 PM
Are you kidding us?????????????????? :puter:

Especially as respects opera, attempting to be more "serious" can equate with being boring or stuffy. Too many people think that the arts are boring and stuffy without adding to their number.

What could possibly 'liven' things up a bit??

(JGG ponders...)

Perhaps if some assets were uncovered/ (The IRS does this frequently ...)

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
January 3rd, 2015, 09:04 PM
Perhaps if some assets were uncovered

It's interesting to notice that a thread we once started to discuss nudity on stage was the one that got the most hits, looking at Google Analytics stats...

But the thing is, it's all good when we are funny about it and we talk about those, erm, assets in general. However I do interview the very ladies who own those assets, and I wonder if they'd get offended/annoyed with the jokes. Of course many of them have told me that they read the site and get curious to read their own interviews and to see what people on Opera Lively are saying about them. If we get too specific, I don't know, some of them might think - wait a moment, are these people listening to my singing, or... "My eyes are up here, mister!"

JohnGerald
January 3rd, 2015, 09:13 PM
D'accord. I have some videos where distinctions between opera and porn get blurred, and it's a distinction worth preserving. Singers dedicate a huge portion of their lives to developing and maintaining their skills, and are very serious about what they do. Because I have some sense of what they give up to provide us with memorable musical moments, I have both respect and appreciation for them.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
January 3rd, 2015, 09:29 PM
Fun discussion, but sorry, I'll have to turn my attention to something *much* more important than opera: the Arizona Cardinals @ Carolina Panthers wild card playoff game! Well, maybe not *much* more important. A little bit, I guess, depending on the mood. Now I'm definitely in the mood for football. Go Panthers!!!

JohnGerald
January 4th, 2015, 12:00 AM
How crude! I am going to watch Robert le Diable rather than gladiatorial sweaty stuff (unless She Who Must Be Obeyed pre-empts the HD TV; she is the resident jock!).

Clayton
January 15th, 2015, 08:08 PM
Hoffmann's post reminded me of one of my favourite covers. I don't like this one; I love it.

The cover for Opera Rara's recording of Belisario uses the picture by François-Joseph Kinson, a dutch painter, on the same subject titled The Death of Belisarius' Wife (circa 1817). Kinson 1770-1839 was a court painter, finishing his career in Paris and such painted many important portraits. I am fairly sure we have come across one of his works in An Opera Novel but I can not find it. Whether correct or not, if the author would help me here, I would appreciate it.

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I think it is tautology by the nature of this discussion to say that it is a great subject matter but also I love the framing, the colours (mostly by imagination) and the depiction of the four family characters from magnificent, innocence, humble and well, Antonina.

The picture is an Oil on canvas, 258 x 217 cm and displayed at Groeninge Museum, Bruges. If I knew it was restored, it would almost be enough for me to travel to Bruges just to see this picture (I would of course indulge in the local beer and fries whilst I was there). Bruges has so much great art on display and in such close proximity (small city), I really love it.

Amfortas
January 15th, 2015, 11:48 PM
The cover for Opera Rara's recording of Belisario uses the picture by François-Joseph Kinson, a dutch painter, on the same subject titled The Death of Belisarius' Wife (circa 1817). Kinson 1770-1839 was a court painter, finishing his career in Paris and such painted many important portraits. I am fairly sure we have come across one of his works in An Opera Novel but I can not find it. Whether correct or not, if the author would help me here, I would appreciate it.

I'm not aware of any Kinson work in the thread, but that doesn't rule out the possibility. Kinson himself settled in Paris a year before the events of the novel, and so easily might have figured, like other painters of the time, as a character in my story.

Clayton
February 8th, 2015, 10:14 PM
The recording of Handel's Saul by Harry Christophers and The Sixteen on the Coro Label

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shows part of the painting by Giovanni Francesco Barbieri, an Italian baroque painter from Emilia (1591-1666), also known as Il Guercino (the squinter due to being cross-eyed). The painting is Saul attacking David (1646) and is displayed at The Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica in Rome.

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I like this picture even though we do not see David because of the expression on Saul's face. It is attractive as there initially seems something wrong with the picture; even though Saul weilds the spear, it his face that has the fear and anguish. Of course once we know the story all becomes clear. Then we can look at the picture whole and we see David's expression...

The cover serves the recording well, it is excellent.

JohnGerald
February 9th, 2015, 12:20 AM
I find the artistic stuff, some VERY good, on book jackets as well as media covers. It's too bad that art, as with music (at least in the US) is so under-appreciated.

I have a print of Botticelli's Birth of Venus, nicely framed, in the living room. I don't dare mention that Venus reminds me of a friend from my wicked youth or it would disappear.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
February 9th, 2015, 01:24 AM
I find the artistic stuff, some VERY good, on book jackets as well as media covers. It's too bad that art, as with music (at least in the US) is so under-appreciated.

I have a print of Botticelli's Birth of Venus, nicely framed, in the living room. I don't dare mention that Venus reminds me of a friend from my wicked youth or it would disappear.

Beware. Wives at times read Opera Lively. Mine at least does. She even posts from time to time (very, very rarely), under Countess_Almaviva, of course.

JohnGerald
February 9th, 2015, 03:57 AM
Luiz, no guts, no glory!

Florestan
July 30th, 2015, 09:23 PM
This one is a gem:
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51uOFQ7n0XL.jpg