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Schigolch
February 1st, 2012, 06:23 PM
Louise Bertin:

http://www.victorhugo.asso.fr/images/Lbertin.jpg

A French poet and composer from the 19th century, that was able to stage at thirty years old the opera La Esmeralda, based on "Notre-Dame de Paris" with a libretto by Victor Hugo himself. It was not a big success, but it was recovered a couple of years ago in France, and a CD was published:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41RauZG4aQL._SL500_AA240_.jpg


A sample in youtube:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCSTCMBiArY

Schigolch
February 1st, 2012, 06:24 PM
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Arts/Arts_/Pictures/2009/7/17/1247821204804/Composer-Judith-Weir-001.jpg

Judith Weir, British composer that has written one of the best operas in the last thirty years, in my view, A Night at the Chinese Opera.

A couple of youtubes:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfjGmTt_krY


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJIyzDTWmp8

Schigolch
February 1st, 2012, 06:25 PM
Ruth Crawford Seeger, Suite for wind quintet:

[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

Schigolch
February 1st, 2012, 06:26 PM
From the Austrian avant-garde composer Olga Neuwirth, the trumpet concerto "miramondo multiplo":


[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

Schigolch
February 1st, 2012, 06:26 PM
Priaulx Rainier

Cello concerto


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqqaAwUjx0g

Schigolch
February 1st, 2012, 06:27 PM
English composer Rebecca Saunders is one of the most interesting contemporary voices, male or female. This is a chamber piece from the 1990s, Into the Blue:

[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

Schigolch
February 1st, 2012, 06:29 PM
http://static.politika.co.rs/uploads/rubrike/144184/i/1/vrebalov%20foto%20sasha%20jancic.jpg

Aleksandra Vrebalov is a Serbian composer, resident in the United States. Sometime ago I heard this piece in a recital by the Kronos Quartet:

Pannonia Boundless

that caught my attention, first for the evocative "Roman Empire" flavour of the title, and then by the homage to the folklore music of the 'pannonian' gypsies. This is very approachable music, suitable for all type of sensibilities:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=scrVEMCwv1I

Elektra
February 1st, 2012, 09:49 PM
Sofia Gubaidulina


[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvD2FUwZjD4

Elektra
February 1st, 2012, 10:00 PM
Barbara Strozzi (1619 – 1677)

Lagrime mie:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2lBnocuMC0


[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

Schigolch
February 2nd, 2012, 11:26 AM
Japanese composer Misato Mochizuki spent some years in Europe, after completing her studies in Japan. During her stay at IRCAM she wrote this beautiful piece, Si bleu, si calme, inspired on the cycles of water and air in Nature. The choice of instruments, and the treatment of sound, is far from traditional, but the final result is not so different from a 19th century's tone poem:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r66LJ3Rd1mg

Schigolch
February 3rd, 2012, 06:50 PM
http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/_/3633535/Thea+Musgrave+theamusgrave.jpg

Thea Musgrave is a Scottish composer, already in her eighties, that have written ten operas in a career spanning almost fifty years. Her major success was Mary, Queen of Scots, premiered the year 1978, in Edimburg. This is one aria from this opera:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-3VbWz6f_c

A non operatic example of her recent production:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mXrbpYuTI8

Schigolch
February 7th, 2012, 08:06 PM
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_E3YYPDHMPCM/RcR-I_raa7I/AAAAAAAAABs/p9xUa_Zti-Y/s400/Galina.jpg

Galina Ustvolskaya, is one hell of a composer. Recently dead, she wrote just a couple of dozens pieces, notably the piano sonatas and the symphonies.

Among the sonatas, my favourite is the number 2:


[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

Of the symphonies, let's hear the Third, written for winds, percussion, piano and voice, 37 years after the sonata number 2:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0LWwbLhfr0

Schigolch
February 12th, 2012, 11:05 PM
Kaija Saariaho, after the big success of her first opera, L'Amour de Loin, is perhaps the best known woman composer nowadays.

Looking for inspiration to write her opera, Saariaho read a brief review on the medieval troubadour Jaufré Rudel. Then, she also read a 15th century manuscript on his life, and listened to the songs written by Rudel.

Fascinated by this subject about the "distant love" ('Amor de Lonh', in Occitan) that Rudel professed for a Christian lady living in the Holy Land, Saariaho wrote a beautiful piece, properly titled "Lonh".

Conceived for soprano voice (amplified) and electronics, that accompanies and evolves the singer. The electronics it's made of mixed recordings of spoken dialogue and songs, in Occitan, French and English, along with percussion and sounds from Nature.

"In the long days of May, the sweet song of the faraway birds is lulling me. Then, I remember a distant love".


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrXaWt0UJ5Y

Schigolch
February 27th, 2012, 09:38 PM
http://es.cantorion.org/photos/composers/large_135.jpg


Fanny Hensel (1805 - 1847) received musical training along with his brother, Felix Mendelssohn. She was a gifted pianist, and her surname comes from her husband, painter Wilhelm Hensel.

She wrote many pieces, but only a few have been published. She died of a heart attack while conducting one of his brother's works.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppTCMjJFw_Y

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
February 28th, 2012, 05:01 AM
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Arts/Arts_/Pictures/2009/7/17/1247821204804/Composer-Judith-Weir-001.jpg

Judith Weir, British composer that has written one of the best operas in the last thirty years, in my view, A Night at the Chinese Opera.

A couple of youtubes:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfjGmTt_krY


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJIyzDTWmp8

I like her music.
A Night at the Chinese Opera: recommendation of recordings? Can it be seen on YouTube?
I found this version, maybe it's the only one available - do you know if it comes with a libretto?

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/413RJQGQ2YL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Expensive on Amazon.com but more reasonably priced by their marketplace vendors (http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B000056TA0/ref=dp_olp_new?ie=UTF8&qid=1330405375&sr=1-24&condition=new).

Schigolch
March 4th, 2012, 11:01 PM
http://geliot.mel.bonis.free.fr/Images/Melbo/corbineauvisage.jpg

Mel Bonis (1858 - 1937) was born in a family totally unrelated to music, but her great talent was recognised and she was able to take classes in a Conservatory after her 18th birthday.

However, in the musical school she met the singer and writer Amédée Hettich and she fell in love. His father, not approving of Mr. Hettich as a husband for her daughter, forced Mel to marry a widower, 25 years her senior. Eventually, Mel gave birth to three childs.

At forty, Mel met again Amédée, and they started a secret affair, with her getting pregnant of a daughter, Madeleine, born in secret. After her husband's death, Mel brought Madeleine home, posing as an orphan. Unfortunately, some years later, Mel's youngest son, Eduard, and Madeleine also fell in love, and a distressed Mel had to confess and cause the disgrace of her two children.

With all this melodramatic stuff, it's almost a miracle that Mel Bonis found time to wrote some good music, like this mélodie, based on a poem from her lover, Amédée:


[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

Comme l'aigle blessé, s'élance dans l'espace
Sans souci de la flèche attachée à son flanc,
Et bravant les regards qui cherchent sa trace,
Verse à travers l'éther la pourpre de son sang...

Elève-toi, mon âme ! et laisse ta blessure
Ouverte à la douleur qui la vient aviver
Plus profonde est la plaie, et plus nous semble pure
L'indicible douceur de l'éternel rêver !

Va ! franchis les sommets où l'aigle altier succombe,
Et de son mal gardant l'impassible orgueil,
Comme l'aigle, ô mon âme ! Choisis une tombe
Grande ainsi que ton deuil !

Schigolch
March 13th, 2012, 11:08 AM
http://image.allmusic.com/00/acg/pic200/drz000/z086/z08624q7p4z.jpg

Grazyna Bacewicz was a Polish violinist and composer, born in 1909 and educated in Warsaw and Paris. After the Second World War she worked as a teacher, until her death in 1969.

This is a beautiful fragment of the String Quartet number three, written in 1947:


[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

Schigolch
May 12th, 2012, 10:03 PM
Peggy Glanville-Hicks was a 20th century Australian composer, that worked mainly in England and the US, written several operas. Her biggest success was The Transposed Heads, based on a tale by Thomas Mann, and premiered in 1954.

http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/b7/57/824c9833e7a0e9d29c952110.L._SL500_AA240_.jpg

In 1963, San Francisco Opera commissioned an opera by Glanville-Hicks, Sappho, based on Lawrence Durrell's play, and Maria Callas was to be the protagonist. However, financial issues made the project to falll through.

A small piece in youtube:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETooTbxrWvI

Nekrotzar
June 19th, 2012, 06:34 AM
Louise Farrenc is also a brilliant composer. I think that her symphonies are some of the best non-operatic works of the 19th century.

No. 3:


[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

Schigolch
July 6th, 2012, 06:55 AM
http://ww2.heidelberg.de/stadtblatt-alt/stbl4702/dinescug.jpg

Violeta Dinescu is a Romanian composer and pianist, living in Germany. She has written several operas, but let's hear "Reversing Fields", inspired in Romanian folklore, coupled with extended techniques to play the clarinet:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUXSs2IM8s4

Schigolch
July 16th, 2012, 10:43 AM
Germaine Tailleferre was a French composer and the only female member of the group of composers known as Les Six (along with Georges Auric, Louis Durey, Arthur Honegger, Darius Milhaud and Francis Poulenc).

Tailleferre wrote several operas, but in this thread let's hear this nice "Concertino pour harpe et piano":


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cv650bvCoYw

Schigolch
August 19th, 2012, 03:01 PM
http://www.haendel.it/photogallery/photo18120/compositori/mawalpurgis.jpg

Maria Antonia Walpurgis, princess of Bavaria, was also an active composer in the 18th century. In 1741, at 23 years old, she married Friedrich Christian, the Elector of Saxony, and remained in Dresden until her death, in 1780. One of the pieces written there was this "Talestri, regina delle amazzoni", from which we can hear the aria 'Vieni al trono':

[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

Schigolch
October 14th, 2012, 12:28 PM
http://www.pithmusic.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/julia_wolfe.jpg

American composer Julia Wolfe (born in 1958) has been active since the 1980s. To the best of my knowledge she has not written any opera yet, but arguably her more succesful piece so far is this "Arsenal of Democracy", premiered in 1993:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_F9IXUGTy4