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Dark_Angel
May 25th, 2012, 02:15 AM
http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/...5/P1000927.jpg (http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff385/darkangel45255/P1000927.jpg)

Next few weeks going through my Naive Vivaldi collection........

If you force me to say which is my fav for now I choose:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51RIdRNvglL._AA300_.jpg (http://go.redirectingat.com/?id=24931X841027&site=operalively.com/forums&xs=1&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fgp%2Fcustomer-media%2Fproduct-gallery%2FB0001XPYLQ%2Fref%3Dcm_ciu_pdp_images_0%3 Fie%3DUTF8%26index%3D0&xguid=7078ac3710ed724f89dc20bb81f10f6c&xcreo=0&sref=http%3A%2F%2Foperalively.com%2Fforums%2Fshowt hread.php%2F37-What-have-you-been-listening-to-lately%2Fpage54%3Fp%3D12113%23post12113)

This is a very lively work with very dramatic passages and thrilling arias, Gemma Bertagnolli really shines check this out to see what I mean:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=w4kkM9W335I

The sound quality with all Naive operas is really good but this stands out for excellence even among such a quality field

Dark_Angel
May 26th, 2012, 03:35 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/511k2VCr%2BJL._SL500_AA300_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B005OSP65W/ref=dp_image_z_0?ie=UTF8&n=5174&s=music)

I don't have this newest Vivaldi opera release yet, Teuzzone conductor Jordi Savall
Don't ever try to follow the plot of Vivaldi operas, but this is his "turandot" dealling with Chinese empire stuff

Any comments for this......

HarpsichordConcerto
May 27th, 2012, 07:58 AM
The Teuzzone under Jodi Savall is the better version around (there is another period instrument version from Brilliant Classics that doesn't quite do it justice). I am also collecting the Vivaldi opera CDs on Naive. Overall, the quality of Vivaldi opera recordings have been rather uneven across all record labels that I have come across (compared with say, Handel operas where the quality has been higher). But all these Vivaldi operas are great welcome to Baroque opera lovers like me anyway!

Dark_Angel
May 27th, 2012, 12:06 PM
The Teuzzone under Jodi Savall is the better version around (there is another period instrument version from Brilliant Classics that doesn't quite do it justice). I am also collecting the Vivaldi opera CDs on Naive. Overall, the quality of Vivaldi opera recordings have been rather uneven across all record labels that I have come across (compared with say, Handel operas where the quality has been higher). But all these Vivaldi operas are great welcome to Baroque opera lovers like me anyway!

Thanks for the vote of confidence.....I was going to buy Teuzzone (Naive) set sooner rather than later.

Those Naive label Vivaldi performances really sell themselves here, unformly very good to great singing with excellent sound quality and smart attractive packaging.

I really like Handel's Italian opera work, his time in Italy during early formative years was well spent

Schigolch
May 27th, 2012, 09:05 PM
http://ximo.files.wordpress.com/2007/03/bajazet_vivaldi.jpg

Of course, Bajazet is a pasticcio, with only just about half of the arias written by Vivaldi himself (others are from Hasse, Porpora, Broschi,...), but this recording by Fabio Biondi and Europa Galante is nothing short of fantastic, from a musical point of view. Dramatically, it's not that good.


[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

HarpsichordConcerto
May 27th, 2012, 11:52 PM
Yes, that's one of the characteristics of Vivaldi operas to be aware of in general: that he was a very "pragmatic" opera composer. With this in mind, one might not feel too surprised by the often recycling of arias and instrumental pieces in many of the operas. This was a common practice amongst opera composers of the period, and Vivaldi was probably just as practical as many others. (So was Handel, but I think to a lesser extent than Vivaldi). Sit back and enjoy!

Dark_Angel
May 28th, 2012, 12:48 AM
http://ximo.files.wordpress.com/2007/03/bajazet_vivaldi.jpg

This set has huge extra with bonus DVD of rehearsal performances which that youtube above was sampled from.....
This should be standard practice a great idea, I love watching those personal touches.

Even without the bonus it is indeed a wonderful set

Dark_Angel
June 2nd, 2012, 02:00 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/511k2VCr%2BJL._SL500_AA300_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B005OSP65W/ref=dp_image_z_0?ie=UTF8&n=5174&s=music)

I don't have this newest Vivaldi opera release yet, Teuzzone conductor Jordi Savall
Don't ever try to follow the plot of Vivaldi operas, but this is his "turandot" dealling with Chinese empire stuff


It is mine......nice sale price from Amazon USA seller importcds $18.89 (this won't last long)

This opera uses horns/brass in large presence for Vivaldi and if you were to guess is sounds like early Handel Italian opera, perhaps Handel even heard it during his early days in Italy, very nice.....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=hL9fFUA4iZA

Dark_Angel
June 9th, 2012, 02:51 AM
http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/...5/P1000927.jpg (http://i1233.photobucket.com/albums/ff385/darkangel45255/P1000927.jpg)

Next few weeks going through my Naive Vivaldi collection........

Finished another trip through the Naive Vivaldi operas, while still fresh in my memory

two favorite:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51RIdRNvglL._AA300_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-media/product-gallery/B0001XPYLQ/ref=cm_ciu_pdp_images_0?ie=UTF8&index=0&isremote=0) http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61hUqD05vsL._AA300_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-media/product-gallery/B00008Y152/ref=cm_ciu_pdp_images_0?ie=UTF8&index=0&isremote=0)




two less preferred:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51VbgSt8v5L._SL500_AA300_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B00004ZBLD/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=5174&s=music) http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51TNSGXeppL._SL500_AA280_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B0036I7BCI/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=163856011&s=dmusic)


On paper the singing talent of La Fida Ninfa should be great, but it is a sluggish mid tempo affair that has long sections of rather bland performance. Juditha Triumphans has one heavy fat vibrato ridden voice that really irritates me.....

My two favorites sparkle like a sunlit stream, full of life and dramatic excitement

Dark_Angel
June 9th, 2012, 02:53 AM
Thanks for the vote of confidence.....I was going to buy Teuzzone (Naive) set sooner rather than later.

Those Naive label Vivaldi performances really sell themselves here, unformly very good to great singing with excellent sound quality and smart attractive packaging.

It has arrived, listening this weekend........

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
June 9th, 2012, 01:57 PM
What I like best about them is the beautiful ladies on the cover pictures...

Aksel
June 9th, 2012, 07:51 PM
What I like best about them is the beautiful ladies on the cover pictures...

The covers on the Naïve Vivaldi series are amazing! Still dunno what they have to do with anything, but they are totally amazeballs.

Dark_Angel
June 9th, 2012, 08:57 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/511k2VCr%2BJL._SL500_AA300_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B005OSP65W/ref=dp_image_z_0?ie=UTF8&n=5174&s=music)

I don't have this newest Vivaldi opera release yet, Teuzzone conductor Jordi Savall

This is a very successful edition, I would easily rank it in top half of released Naive Vivaldi series while not displacing either of my two top picks (Orlando Finto + La Verita) All voices give inventive exciting arias and Savall's orchestral work is just delightful, 3 CD set as usual for Naive has excellent sound, a real winner......

Soave_Fanciulla
June 9th, 2012, 09:06 PM
What I like best about them is the beautiful ladies on the cover pictures...

No seriously, we could have Topi Lehtipuu and we get this? Not impressed.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41aTtao00gL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
June 9th, 2012, 10:18 PM
No seriously, we could have Topi Lehtipuu and we get this? Not impressed.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41aTtao00gL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Oh yeah. I'd much rather have her, obviously.:heart1:

Aksel
June 9th, 2012, 10:47 PM
Oh yeah. I'd much rather have her, obviously.:heart1:

I also want Topi Lehtipuu. 2 against 1. I and Nat win.

HarpsichordConcerto
June 10th, 2012, 02:27 AM
On paper the singing talent of La Fida Ninfa should be great, but it is a sluggish mid tempo affair that has long sections of rather bland performance. Juditha Triumphans has one heavy fat vibrato ridden voice that really irritates me.....


This version of Juditha Triumphans would be my pick, under Robert King with The King's Consort.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pJKbszzvL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Dark_Angel
June 10th, 2012, 02:33 AM
This version of Juditha Triumphans would be my pick, under Robert King with The King's Consort.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pJKbszzvL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

I think that is also in the 11 CD Vivaldi boxset of Robert King............
I purchased this long ago but have not listened much since collecting the Naive series of Vivaldi


http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61e6wrMSgML._SL500_AA300_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B00000DUE7/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=5174&s=music)

On the plus side I did like Magdalena Kozena (Mrs Simon Rattle) on the Naive Jubitha Triumphans, but the bar is set very high for the Naive series and even a slight problem keeps it from the elite status acheived by others in the series

Schigolch
June 10th, 2012, 09:44 AM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41ED05STG6L._SL500_AA300_.jpg

For seasoned lovers of Vivaldi's operas, this could be a welcome surprise.

It's an early piece, written in 1717, and this is also an "early" recording, as HIP performances go. But it's great music, and beautiful singing!.


[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
October 28th, 2012, 02:05 AM
Vivaldi / Giacomelli: L'Oracolo In Messenia on CD

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51NfMbDBZhL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

L'Oracolo in Messenia, overo La Merope - opera in musica, RV 726

Pastiche in three acts, music by Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) - 11 numbers, and Germiniano Giacomelli (1692-1740) - 13 numbers, with one number by Riccardo Broschi (ca. 1698-1756, Farinelli's brother) and one by Johann Adolph Hasse (1699-1783).
Libretto by Apostolo Zeno - sung in Italian; adapted from the libretto by the same author for Giacomelli's La Merope, in its turn derived from Euripide's tragedy Cresphontes.
Premiered at the Teatro S. Angelo, Venice, 28 December 1737
Vienna Version first performed at the Kärntnertortheater, Vienna, Carnival 1742

Reconstruction of the Vienna version by Fabio Biondi

Orchestra: period ensemble Europa Galante, conducted by Fabio Biondi (who also plays the violin), and made of three violins, viola, cello, double bass, oboe, bassoon, horn, theorbo, and harpsichord

Cast

Polifonte, king of Messenia - Magnus Staveland, tenor
Merope, queen of Messenia, widow of Cresfonte - Ann Hallenberg, mezzo-soprano
Epitide, son of Merope, disguised under the name of Cleon - Vivica Genaux, mezzo soprano
Elmira, princess of Etolia - Romina Basso, mezzo-soprano
Trasimede, chief minister of Messenia - Julia Lezhneva, soprano
Licisco, ambassador from Etolia - Franziska Gottwald, mezzo-soprano
Anassandro, confidant of Polifonte - Xavier Sabata, countertenor

Recorded live at the Wiener Konzerthaus, Vienna, on 13-15 January 2012, as part of the Resonanzen festifal, by ORF (Austrian Broadcasting Corporation), Radio Österreich I

Released on 2 CDs in 2012 by EMI Records / Virgin Classics

Libretto included, in Italian, with side-by-side translations into English, French, and German

The insert includes color pictures of the conductor, the singers, and the ensemble; a 1-page essay about the opera authored by Fabio Biondi and Frédéric Delamea; a much longer 8-page essay about the opera, the composer, and the circumstances of composition, authored by Frédéric Delamea; a 2-page synopsis authored by Berhnhard Drobig; list of tracks with names of the arias, characters, and duration; sources for all numbers including who composed them, and from what opera they were lifted. All of the above come in English, French, and German, and everything is nicely packaged in a rigid box.

Running times: CD 1 79:49 (Act I, Act II scenes 1-7), CD 2 76:52 (Act II scenes 8-14, Act III)

Sound quality: impeccable, the highest possible, with perfect balance, clarity, and volume.

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This recording is an admirable work. The score for Vivaldi's opera L'Oracolo in Messenia is lost. The libretto, however, survived, and Fabio Biondi reconstructed the opera as a pastiche, transplanting onto the words music from Giacomelli's opera La Merope, which is clever because there are hints that Vivaldi did just that, since his L'Oracolo in Messenia was a readaptation of Giacomelli's La Merope and may have had music directly borrowed from it - it was actually a pastiche as well. This practice of borrowing arias from other composers wasn't uncommon at the time, and there are numerous other examples of such in Vivaldi's works. Fabio Biondi also used music from Vivaldi's own operas, including Griselda, Catone in Utica, Motezuma, Dorilla in Tempe, Farnace (Ferrara version), and Semiramide. Two outstanding additional numbers come from Broschi's Artaserse, and Hasse's Siroe, re di Persia.

Vivaldi wrote a first version of this opera for Venice (in very short notice, to savage his season after his Siroe, re di Persia fell apart in Ferrara thanks to the archbishop refusing to allow the composer into the city due to suspecting him of sinful relations with the singer Anna Girò), and it was greatly successful. The score for it is lost. It was received with "tumultuous applause" and "firm approval" according to the papers. In need for something guaranteed to be successful thanks to the financial difficulties brought about by the Ferrara fiasco, Vivaldi relied on Giacomelli's La Merope, given that it was a smashing triumph (in part, thanks to the casting of the two best castrati in town, Farinelli and Caffarelli).

When Vivaldi decided to quit Venice (the circumstances are well explained in the insert) and move to Vienna, he thought he should take this particular opera with him, due to the fact that Zeno, the librettist, was a former poet laureate to the imperial court in Vienna. Besides, this was arguably Zeno's best libretto, described by the poet as "the least bad of my dramas." Vivaldi wanted to make an even better impression, and added three ballets and seven new arias, dropping three of the old ones (Fabio Biondi does conserve one of them - "S'in campo armato" - which only existed in the Venetian version). He also changed the name of one character - the princess Argia became Elmira.

Vivaldi evidently hoped for the same success achieved in Venice for his Viennese version, since he wanted to impress the emperor. But fate decided otherwise: on 20 October 1740, before Vivaldi's premiere, Charles VI suddenly died, allegedly after eating poisonous mushrooms. All theaters in Vienna were closed down for one year, in sign of grieving for the emperor. Vivaldi made unsuccessful attempts to obtain a commission from the emperor's successor (Prince Anton Ulrich von Saxe-Meiningen). Without a sponsor, the composer plunged into financial turmoil, sold his scores at rock-bottom prices, and died himself shortly thereafter, receiving a pauper's funeral.

Still, after the theaters reopened, Vivaldi's L'Oracolo in Messenia, Viennese version, did see the light of day. Apparently Prince Anton was remorseful for having brushed off Vivaldi, and Anna Girò, Vivaldi's loyal friend, also insisted that the opera should be staged (she sang the role of Merope). This posthumous production allowed the Viennese public to hear a moving postscript to the great composer's operatic career. And now, Fabio Biondi brings us what is likely to be a rather close approximation, because while the score for the second version is also lost, in the surviving libretto Vivaldi did give indications of what music he was planning to borrow for his pastiche.

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The CD

The result of Fabio Biondi's work is extraordinary. In spite of the eclectic sources, Maestro Biondi's inspired mastery of the music from this period ensured excellent unity of style and great pace. He recovered most of the recitatives from La Merope, and everything flows smoothly. And of course, by lifting great music from several different operas, Fabio Biondi was able to put together a great collection of fabulous arias. Particularly notewhorty, for example, are the very energetic "Nel mar cosi funesta" from Vivaldi's Farnace, the agile coloratura of "Son qual nave" from Broschi's Artaserse, the sonorous "Spera quest'alma amante" from Giacomelli's La Merope, and the very rhythmic "Nell'orror di notte oscura" from Hasse's Siroe, re di Persia - but there are many others just as excellent, particularly in the second half of the work when things pick up speed and excitement. The overture is by Vivaldi and comes from Griselda, but unlike the original, is transposed to F major and uses horns.

Add to the great music a very interesting libretto that actually has a compelling story with some intriguing twists, and you have a winner, as far as the opera is concerned.

And then, to complete the pleasure, get a homogeneous cast of absolutely virtuosic singers accompanied by no less accomplished musicians, and package everything with a very complete insert that contains plenty of information about the work. The ice on the cake, deliver it with impeccable sound!

What do you get? A highly recommended CD, of course. This is absolutely indispensable for lovers of music from this period.

It is hard to say individual praise for each of the seven singers, because they are all incredibly - and equally - good. The expression "no weak links" hasn't been as appropriately used in a long time. We get a Vivica Genaux full of energy and incredibly agile. She steals the show several times over, and shines in many of her numbers. Ann Hallenberg is creamy and suave, but then explodes in fury when needed. Magnus Staveland with the only tenor role in a sea of mezzos, a soprano, and a contralto, holds very well the male-sounding part of the enterprise. Xavier Sabata, with a dark voice for a contralto, is a welcome surprise. Julia Lezhneva has a peculiar, delicate, and pleasant timbre, and together with Vivica Genaux, is arguably one of the two most dazzling singers in this recording - oh well, maybe I should say the three best, since Ann Hallenberg is also great! Romina Basso is able to convey good color (she is a bit breathy, though, but not to a bothersome point). Franziska Gottwald is very powerful and precise, especially in the fiendshly difficult "Nell'orror di notte oscura."

The period ensemble Europa Galante is simply sublime, as is Biondi's dynamic direction.

Like I said, early opera lover: you can't not have this CD in your collection. Here is the Amazon.com link ($28): [clicky (http://www.amazon.com/Vivaldi-LOracolo-Messenia-Julia-Lehzneva/dp/B008QUQKBY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1351382373&sr=8-1&keywords=l%27oracolo+in+messenia)]

HarpsichordConcerto
October 28th, 2012, 04:20 AM
I think that is also in the 11 CD Vivaldi boxset of Robert King............
I purchased this long ago but have not listened much since collecting the Naive series of Vivaldi


Yes, it is in the Robert King box.

HarpsichordConcerto
October 28th, 2012, 04:22 AM
What do you get? A highly recommended CD, of course. This is absolutely indispensable for lovers of music from this period.


I shall buy. Thanks for the thorough review. It was enjoyable read.

Schigolch
October 28th, 2012, 08:43 AM
I've also listened to this recording.

I think there should be a limit to the inventiveness of the marketing guys. I mean, in this pastiche we have:

- 13 arias by Giacomelli
- 11 arias by Vivaldi
- 1 aria by Broschi
- 1 aria by Hasse
- Pretty much all the recitatives come from Giacomelli

And then the cover only shows Vivaldi, and not even a mention to Giacomelli, that is providing the bulk of the music!. Come on.

Apart from this, Europa Galante and Biondi are performing very, very well. Lezhneva and Hallenberg, simply great. Vivica Genaux, for those that don't care about her peculiar timbre and her mannerisms, is also providing some wonderful singing here. A nice intervention by the countertenor Sabata, and a solid Romina Basso, while Gottwald and Staveland are the weaker part of this recording.

Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)
October 28th, 2012, 12:24 PM
I've also listened to this recording.

I think there should be a limit to the inventiveness of the marketing guys. I mean, in this pastiche we have:

- 13 arias by Giacomelli
- 11 arias by Vivaldi
- 1 aria by Broschi
- 1 aria by Hasse
- Pretty much all the recitatives come from Giacomelli

And then the cover only shows Vivaldi, and not even a mention to Giacomelli, that is providing the bulk of the music!. Come on.

Apart from this, Europa Galante and Biondi are performing very, very well. Lezhneva and Hallenberg, simply great. Vivica Genaux, for those that don't care about her peculiar timbre and her mannerisms, is also providing some wonderful singing here. A nice intervention by the countertenor Sabata, and a solid Romina Basso, while Gottwald and Staveland are the weaker part of this recording.

Yes, this is why I titled my review Vivaldi / Giacomelli. Even though historically this was an opera by Vivaldi, since the music is lost and it was re-created using like you said Giacomelli's music more often than Vivaldi's own, it wouldn't have hurt to mention Giacomelli on the cover. I don't understand why they didn't, since even in terms of marketing, a pastiche is not a bad thing; lately people have been attentive to pastiches - one example, the smashing success of The Enchanted Island - so this could actually have been a selling point; it is hard to understand why they didn't mention the other composer. I find that this is a plus, we kind of increase our admiration for this work from the fact that Fabio Biondi did this reconstruction so well, choosing very compatible music with stylistic unity to make the pastiche. I mean, two of the best numbers are Hasse's and Broschi's. Why not publicize it as what it is, that is, a pastiche? Go figure...

Glad we agree on the three best singes of the seven - Lezhneva, Hallenberg, and Genaux.
It is true that Staveland doesn't shine as much as the others... this is predominantly female/contralto music, but I though he held well his part. But for my education, why didn't you like Gottwald?

Aksel
October 28th, 2012, 02:27 PM
Baroque music isn't really tenor-land, now is it (except Ercole sul Termodonte)? Staveland is wonderful both in the Oslo Poppea and the Berlin Orlando Paladino.

Schigolch
October 28th, 2012, 05:19 PM
But for my education, why didn't you like Gottwald?

Sometimes you can perceive a vibrato that is not in style, and she is kind of lost in the ensemble arias. It was a decent performance, anyway, but not in the same class than many of the other singers.

A performance with pretty much the same cast:


[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]

Dark_Angel
December 15th, 2012, 08:05 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51dYLeAaQGL._SL500_AA300_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B008R5OKD8/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=5174&s=music)

Another Naive Vivaldi opera release......and guess what, another winner! (big surprise)

Delightful opera full of lively arias dominated by female vocalists, look at this heavy hitter line up:

-Romina Basso (mezzo)
-Gaelle Arquez (soprano)
-Teodora Gheorghiu (soprano)
-Delphine Galou (contralto)
-Roberta Mameli (soprano)

I could care less what is going on with the plot, this is just delightful inspired baroque singing with Naive's typical excellent sound and quality packaging, almost no need to sample Naive Vivaldi opera releases....you just push the buy button!

Aria sung by Delphine Galou:


[Link to video deleted by Admin - video no longer available]