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Thread: Ponselle Opinions Needed For A Speech I'm Giving

          
   
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  1. #1
    Junior Member Newcomer Seattleoperafan's Avatar
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    Ponselle Opinions Needed For A Speech I'm Giving

    Are there other Ponselle fans out there. I've done 14 opera appreciation talks at my Toastmasters Club ( all on Youtube) and plan to do my second talk on Ponselle... the last was 4 years ago. What do you find unique or superlative about her voice? What recording do you think best shows her uniqueness? I worship her myself At this point I plan on playing an excerpt from La Vestale O nomi tutelar and one from Trovatore (" D'amore sull'..... I think it goes). There is supposed to be an article by the per son who runs this board but I can't find it. I appreciate your help.
    Last edited by Seattleoperafan; April 2nd, 2013 at 05:30 AM. Reason: Forgotten bit

  2. #2
    Schigolch
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    http://operalively.com/forums/conten...-rosa-ponselle

    About her best recording, there are many that can be named. Personally, I would choose this one:

    Moderator note: The Youtube clip posted here has now been taken down
    Last edited by Soave_Fanciulla; January 7th, 2018 at 02:24 AM.

  3. #3
    Junior Member Newcomer Seattleoperafan's Avatar
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    Thanks. I'll give that one another listen. I've heard it and know it is one of her best.

  4. #4
    Schigolch
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    Ponselle was very fond, and very proud, of her Violetta, that was acclaimed in London, but got mixed reviews in New York.

    On the other hand, she was rather indifferent to, and even afraid of, singing Aida.

    It's funny, but with the passing of the decades, I think that listening to the recordings she was a dream Aida, especially in her younger years, while Violetta was not the best role for her voice, though she gave a great rendition.

    Moderator note: The Youtube clip posted here has now been taken down
    Last edited by Soave_Fanciulla; January 7th, 2018 at 02:24 AM.

  5. #5
    Junior Member Newcomer Seattleoperafan's Avatar
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    I think she was superlative in Aida, but the exposed high C in O Patria Mia terrified her and she stopped doing it.. Met Opera Radio broadcast her Traviata from the 30's some time ago. I wish they could dig up a Norma broadcast.

  6. #6
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Welcome to Opera Lively.

    For some reason only 7 of the excellent articles by Schigolch on Rosa Ponselle were showing (although I had set that section for up to 20 articles, and had, I thought, correctly numbered them). There are actually 16 of them. I played with the settings a bit and now I believe all 16 are showing. It's hard to tell since the board shows differently when it's an administrator looking, as opposed to a general member. I think I've fixed it, but please let me know if now you can see all 16 articles when you click on the link below:

    http://operalively.com/forums/conten...-rosa-ponselle

    About finding these articles and other similar ones, when you go to our "Home Page - Articles and Interviews" by clicking on the tab up there on the top left corner of all our pages, there are two ways to navigate to our content. One is to use the widget on the top left. When you click on Exclusive Articles the tree of articles opens. You keep clicking on what you need. Please notice that further down, if you click on Local Area, then United States, you'll find an area for Washington State.

    The other way, is to use our Clickable Index. It is right in the middle of our Home Page (top center), and it contains not only descriptions of our content, but also links that you can click on, to be taken to the various articles and discussion forums.

    You can also get directly to the clickable index by clicking [here].

    Feel free to send to me (by Private Message which you can do from your profile or just clicking on my nickname Almaviva) announcements for your opera appreciation talks and I'll be glad to post them on the Washington State area. General members can't post on that area of the board (given the complexities and permissions necessary to manage the CMS publishing area) but you can send your announcements to me and I'll copy and paste them there.

    You can also use the News forum to post about your opera talks, or the Classifieds forum (although the latter is more appropriate if you are actually selling something).

    Feel free to use Opera Lively's resources to the maximum extent; we'd love to have more coverage of the Seattle events, and since you're a lecturer on the topic of opera, we'll be delighted to read your contributions to the discussions.
    Last edited by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva); April 2nd, 2013 at 10:36 AM.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  7. #7
    Schigolch
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seattleoperafan View Post
    I think she was superlative in Aida, but the exposed high C in O Patria Mia terrified her and she stopped doing it.. Met Opera Radio broadcast her Traviata from the 30's some time ago. I wish they could dig up a Norma broadcast.

    She was, and she transposed the aria to be more at ease. However, the recording above from 1918 (she premiered the role in 1920 at the MET) is fantastic. Such a voice, with those *wonderful* low notes and with the same colour up to the high C. There are other recordings of the aria from 1923 and 1926. Her last Aida was in Richmond, in 1930 (in the MET, she stopped singing Aida in 1926).

    There is not a realistic chance of getting a complete Norma. Again, not the best role for her, though Maestro Serafin thought so highly of Ponselle's Norma, that he even preferred her to Callas.

  8. #8
    Junior Member Newcomer Seattleoperafan's Avatar
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    The La Traviata from the Met in the 30's was broadcast on Sirius and I was not completely blown away with it. I LOVE her voice, but after she got in her 30's I felt she was realistically more of a mezzo because of her unreliability with B and C. She probably thought so herself, hence her huge disappointment that her Carmen wasn't highly thought of. She was a star and there Carmen and Delila are about the only star mezzo roles. Her recordings of Delila's arias are superb. She retired shortly after Carmen. She was a big enough star to have simply transposed down more arias like she did with Sempre Libera. BTW, thanks for the links to the articles on her on this site.

  9. #9
    Schigolch
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    Ponselle's retirement was due to several things: she was genuinely tired after two decades of singing opera, she was newly married, her voice was changing...

    The recordings from the 1950s at Villa Pace showed indeed that she could have sung twenty years more, with no problem. But that's life.
    Last edited by Soave_Fanciulla; January 7th, 2018 at 02:25 AM.

  10. #10
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seattleoperafan View Post
    I've been looking for that!!!!!!
    Hehehe, you came to the right place, my friend! Schigolch is quite the Ponselle expert! When I first read your quest - "are there other Ponselle fans out there?" - I thought, "oh boy, Seattleoperafan is in for a treat, wait until he meets our good Schigolch!"

    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  11. #11
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    That's not entirely coincidence. I met Seattleoperafan somewhere else and suggested he visit here - thought he'd find some kindred spirits!
    Natalie

  12. #12
    Schigolch
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    "A sapphire having had the misfortune to be mounted next to a diamond."

    That's what Giuseppe Martinelli said about Carmela Ponselle, Rosa's elder sister, her vaudeville companion and also an operatic singer at the MET.

    Both sisters singing together:


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