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Thread: The A to Z of opera; the unofficial OL community guide to opera

          
   
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  1. #286
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    K is for the Polish lirico-spinto soprano Teresa Kubiak, who appeared at a number of major international opera houses in the latter decades of the 20th century, singing repertoire that encompassed the Italian, German, Slavic, and English (Ellen Orford in Peter Grimes) repertoires. She is currently a professor of voice at Indiana University, Bloomington.



    She recorded the role of Tatyana in Eugene Onegin under Sir Georg Solti, which forms the soundtrack for a film of the opera. It appears actors filled the roles on screen, as neither the Tatyana nor the Onegin here resembles Kubiak or Bernd Weikl.


  2. #287
    Senior Member Involved Member Floria's Avatar
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    K is for Kirsten Flagstad

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    Kirsten Målfrid Flagstad (12 July 1895 – 7 December 1962) was a Norwegian opera singer and a highly regarded Wagnerian soprano. She ranks among the greatest singers of the 20th century

    Flagstad's debut at the Met, as Sieglinde in Die Walküre on the afternoon of 2 February 1935, created a sensation, though it was not planned as a special event. By this time, after weeks of rehearsals, Met management already knew what they had, but they nonetheless decided on a low key debut. Flagstad was unknown in the United States at the time. The performance was, however, broadcast nationwide on the Met's weekly syndicated radio program, and the first inkling of the deluge of critical praise to come was given when intermission host and former Met star Geraldine Farrar discarded her prepared notes, overwhelmed by what she had just heard, and breathlessly announced that a new star had just been born. Days later, Flagstad sang Isolde, and later that month, she performed Brünnhilde in Die Walküre and Götterdämmerung for the first time. Before the end of the season, Flagstad sang Elsa in Lohengrin, Elisabeth in Tannhäuser, and her first Kundry in Parsifal. Almost overnight, she had established herself as the pre-eminent Wagnerian soprano of the era.

    K is for Dorothy Kirsten

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    Dorothy Kirsten (July 6, 1910, Montclair, New Jersey – November 18, 1992, Los Angeles, California) was an American operatic soprano.

    Kirsten joined the roster of principal sopranos at the Philadelphia La Scala Opera Company (PLSOC) in 1943 and spent much of her time performing there through 1947. She made her debut with the company in an out-of-town performance at the Syria Mosque in Pittsburgh on May 18, 1943 as Mimì in Giacomo Puccini's La Boheme with Nino Martini as Rodolfo, Carlo Morelli as Marcello, and Armand Balendonck conducting.[citation needed] In the 1943-1944 PLSOC season at the Academy of Music she portrayed Mimì many times and sang Nedda in Pagliacci with Giovanni Martinelli as Canio. She also toured with the company to Detroit in October 1943, singing Mimì to Armand Tokatyan's Rodolfo. Kirsten opened the PLSOC's 1944-1945 season singing Micaëla in Georges Bizet's Carmen with Bruna Castagna in the tile role. She also toured with company to Cleveland singing Mimì. In February 1946 she traveled with PLSOC to Washington D.C. to perform Marguerite in Charles Gounod's Faust. In December 1949 she recorded Manon Lescaut with the world renowned tenor Jussi Björling. Her final year performing with the PLSOC was the 1946-1947 season, portraying Cio-cio-san in Madama Butterfly and Juliette in Roméo et Juliette.

    Kirsten debuted at the Metropolitan Opera with the role of Mimi in La Boheme on December 1, 1945, and continued to sing with the Met for the next thirty years. While she performed primarily in the United States, she did perform in Europe at times, and gave performances in the USSR in 1962, singing Violetta in La Traviata at the Bolshoi Opera. She sang in the American premieres of William Walton's Troilus and Cressida and Francis Poulenc's Dialogues of the Carmelites in San Francisco.

  3. #288
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    K is for Koch --
    The French lyric mezzo Sophie, who has made an international name for herself in roles such as Charlotte in Werther, Octavian in Der Rosenkavalier, and the Composer in Ariadne auf Naxos. Here she sings a portion of Rosina's "Una voce poco fa" from Il Barbiere di Siviglia:



    And the German Heldenbariton Wolfgang, a member of the ensemble at Munich's Bavarian State Opera who has graduated from Papageno (seen in the video) to Wagner's Hans Sachs, Telramund, Alberich, and Wotan, and Strauss' Jochanaan and Barak.


  4. #289
    Senior Member Involved Member Floria's Avatar
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    K is for Raina Kabaivanska

    The soprano, Raina Kabaivanska, was born in Burgas on 15 December 1934 under the name of Raina Jakimova. Following studies at the State Music Academy with Prokopova and Ilija Jossifov she won the famous Bulgarian Dimitrov Prize.

    After her debut with the Sofia National Opera in 1957 as Tatyana in Eugene Onegin, she went on to further studies in Italy. Her Italian debut in 1959 was singing Nedda in Pagliacci, this time under the name of Raina Kabai. At the La Scala in 1961 she sang in a production of Beatrice di Tenda. Appearing as a regular guest artist at the Royal Opera in London since 1962, she appeared in that year as Desdemona with Mario del Monaco as Otello. Between 1970 and 1974, appearing at the Arena di Verona, she was popular as Butterfly and Mimi. Since 1971 she had a contract with the Hamburg State Opera for guest appearances. Her debut with the Paris Grand Opéra was in 1975 singing Leonora in Forza del Destino. At the Rome Opera in 1988 she sang Elizabetta in Roberto Devereux and in 1989, Adriana Lecouvreur. Other guest appearances included Salzburg, Vienna, and the Bolshoi and Leningrad Theaters.

    The United States 1962 debut of Raina Kabaivanska was in San Francisco singing Desdemona in Otello followed by her Metropolitan Opera debut as Nedda later that year. She continued singing at the Met for the next twelve seasons in roles that included Maddalena, Mimi, Elizabetta, Tatyana, Marguerite, Butterfly, Lisa, Manon Lescaut and Desdemona. Other appearances in the United States included Chicago, Dallas, New Orleans, Baltimore and San Francisco.

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  5. #290
    Senior Member Involved Member Floria's Avatar
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    K is for KaritaMattila

    Karita Marjatta Mattila (born September 5, 1960) is a leading operatic soprano. She was born in Perniö, Finland. Mattila appears regularly in the major opera houses worldwide, including the Metropolitan Opera, the Royal Opera House in London, Théâtre du Châtelet, Opéra Bastille, the Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera, Houston Grand Opera, Vienna State Opera, Toronto Roy Thomson Hall and Großes Festspielhaus, Salzburg and with top orchestras.

    During her career, Mattila has sold over 150,000 certified records, which places her among the top 50 best-selling female soloists in Finland.

    Career:
    In 1983, Mattila won the first Cardiff Singer of the World competition. The same year she graduated from the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki, where she studied singing with Liisa Linko-Malmio. She then continued her studies with Vera Rozsa in London.
    In 1985, she made her Covent Garden debut with the Royal Opera as Pamina in Mozart's Die Zauberflöte. In 1988, she was seen as Emma in the first ever televised production of Schubert's Fierrabras at the Vienna State Opera.

    On March 22, 1990, she made her Metropolitan Opera debut in Mozart's Don Giovanni. In 1994, she made her Spanish debut as Tatyana in Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin in Madrid.
    In 1996 followed important Paris debuts in Wagner's Lohengrin, Verdi's Don Carlos for which she received the François Reichenbach Prize Orphée du Lyrique and in Richard Strauss' Arabella in 2002.

    In 1997, she was nominated for the Laurence Olivier Award for her performance of Elisabeth in Don Carlos at the Royal Opera House and awarded the Evening Standard Ballet, Opera and Classical Music Award for "Outstanding Performance of the Year" in this production. Mattila has won Grammy Awards for "Best Opera Recording" for Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg in 1998 and for Jenůfa in 2004. In 2001 The New York Times chose Karita Mattila as the best singer of the year for her performance in Fidelio at the Metropolitan Opera, and in the same year she was nominated for the Laurence Olivier Award "Outstanding Achievement in Opera" for both Jenůfa and Lisa in The Queen of Spades at the Royal Opera House, London.

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  6. #291
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    K is for Kashchey the Deathless

    an opera by Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov 1844-1908, the Russian composer known as a member of the five.

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    the libretto for which was written with his daughter Sofiya and was his 12th opera, based on Russian fairy tales. It premiered at Solodovnikov Theater in Moscow 12 December 1902.

    Kaschey has stored his immortality in the tear of his daughter but she has her heart broken that and leaves him up the creek...

    another beautiful fantasy opera from one of my favourite composers, a good recording is available under the brilliant Brilliant Classics label

    Rimsky Korsakov: Kashchey the Immortal
    Alexander Arkhipov (Kashchey The Immortal), Irina Zhurina (The Princess), Nina Terentieva (Kashcheyevna), Vladislav Verestnikov (Prince Ivan Korolevitch) & Vladimir Matorin (The Storm Knight)
    Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra & Yurlov Academic Choir, Andrey Chistiakov
    1991 recording

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    There was a performance in 1905 under Glazunov's direction following the Bloody Sunday massacre as a tribute to Rimsky-Korsakov who had been persecuted by the authorities following his support for the students. This turned into a political demonstration that had to be quelled by the police.

  7. #292
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    K is for knight knight

    what Elsa said to Lohengrin before switching off the lights...

  8. #293
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    K is for knight knight

    what Elsa said to Lohengrin before switching off the lights...
    Oh, that's a bad one . . .

  9. #294
    Senior Member Involved Member Floria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    K is for knight knight

    what Elsa said to Lohengrin before switching off the lights...

  10. #295
    Senior Member Involved Member Floria's Avatar
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    K if for Kate Pinkerton

    Puccini: Madama Butterfly
    Pinkerton's America wife. Mezzo-soprano

  11. #296
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    L is for Lucia di Lammermoor

    perhaps the most famous of operas by Gaetano Donizetti (1797-1848). The libretto was by Salvatore Cammarano based on the story by Walter Scott, The Bride of Lammermoor, which takes place in Eighteenth Century Scotland. The first performance was 26 September 1835 at the Teatro San Carlo in Naples.

    Some of our favourite recordings

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  12. #297
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    L is for Leonora/Leonore/Léonor/Léonore. This gal really gets around in opera, and appears in one of her various guises in
    - Alessandro Stradella (Flotow)/Stradella (Franck)
    - L'amont Jaloux (Grétry)
    - The Conquest of Granada (Emilio Arrieta)
    - La Favorite (Donizetti)
    - Fidelio (Beethoven)/Léonore (Gaveaux)/Leonora (Paër)
    - La Forza del Destino (Verdi)
    - Maskarade (Nielsen)
    - Oberto (Verdi)
    - Rosamonda di Inghilterra (Donizetti)
    - Il Trovatore (Verdi)
    And probably a few others of which I'm unaware.

  13. #298
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    L is for Leonora/Leonore/Léonor/Léonore. This gal really gets around in opera, and appears in one of her various guises in
    - Alessandro Stradella (Flotow)/Stradella (Franck)
    - L'amont Jaloux (Grétry)
    - The Conquest of Granada (Emilio Arrieta)
    - La Favorite (Donizetti)
    - Fidelio (Beethoven)/Léonore (Gaveaux)/Leonora (Paër)
    - La Forza del Destino (Verdi)
    - Maskarade (Nielsen)
    - Oberto (Verdi)
    - Rosamonda di Inghilterra (Donizetti)
    - Il Trovatore (Verdi)
    And probably a few others of which I'm unaware.
    Well, I know another gal with an L, Isabel Leonard, and she also gets around and appears in various guises - Cherubino, Rosina, Angelina, Dorabella, Sesto, etc., etc. Besides, she is gorgeous. So, she beats your Leonora/Leonore/Léonor/Léonore. There!

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    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  14. #299
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    Yes, you can definitely hear a certain baritonal quality in his singing. Nice tone and lots of power. I wish I could get over my aversion to historical sound, as it would open up some interesting recordings, but there you go. You are having a good explore of all these recordings these days, Amfortas.
    I too had an aversion to historical (i.e., bad) sound quality. But now I just find it part of the romance of immersing myself in an earlier era, as if I were actually listening to a live radio broadcast from the Met in the 30s or 40s. It's fun hearing that history come alive--and I can always time travel to more modern recordings when I feel the need for better sound.
    Last edited by Amfortas; January 25th, 2015 at 02:27 PM.

  15. #300
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    I think similarly; sometimes the sound of an older recording can add colour or feeling to the music.

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