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Thread: Regietheatre - The Death of Opera?

          
   
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  1. #31
    Senior Member Involved Member Floria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnGerald View Post
    Also the C Major Tutto Verdi release of La Battaglia di Legnano, which was staged as some kind of commentary on art, rather than a celebration of Italian nationalism.
    Was this the Tutto Verdi with all the bodies intertwined ? My husband mentioned this the other day and neither of us could remember which one it was.

  2. #32
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    It's not the movement itself that is flawed - it's the individual lack of talent from some practitioners.
    On the whole, I agree with your post. But to quibble just a bit, I wouldn't take the presence of blood, rotten dead animals, nudity, machine guns, or even altered endings in themselves as sure indications of a "bad" Regie production. It's all a question of context and the skill of the director. Even the ultimate Regie cliché--Nazis--was used effectively in Stefan Herheim's widely praised history-of-Germany Bayreuth Parsifal.

    Everything's been done before--but everything can still be done well.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Involved Member Floria's Avatar
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    An interesting Nabucco. I think some of the bees need dancing lessons.


  4. #34
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    I'm pretty certain the above clip proves my point. I'm just . . . not exactly sure *how*.

  5. #35
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amfortas View Post
    On the whole, I agree with your post. But to quibble just a bit, I wouldn't take the presence of blood, rotten dead animals, nudity, machine guns, or even altered endings in themselves as sure indications of a "bad" Regie production. It's all a question of context and the skill of the director. Even the ultimate Regie cliché--Nazis--was used effectively in Stefan Herheim's widely praised history-of-Germany Bayreuth Parsifal.

    Everything's been done before--but everything can still be done well.
    Sure. We agree on the essential ingredient: talent. I've recently praised extensively a Regie production of TLOTICOKATMF which spooked our friend Clayton. It had blood, graphic violence, rape with forceful oral sex, machine guns... but was quite successful. So, sure, as much as a traditional production *can* have the clichés of heavy curtains and candelabra and party gowns and still be good, a Regie production *can* have the clichés above and still be good, as long as talent is the main ingredient.

    But generally speaking, I'd say that 9-feet-tall masturbating bunnies are usually a bad idea.

    And of course, Brünnhilde delivering a baby at the end of Götterdämmerung is definitely an abomination and I'd love to see a law voted by the Danish Parliament establishing that directors who engage in such heresies are to be sentenced to 25 years of re-education, being daily attached to a chair à la Clockwork Orange with their eyelids forcefully open, and exposed to Zeffirelli's Bohème performed by some really fat people who park and bark, over and over and over! I'm thinking of running for office and sponsoring such law.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  6. #36
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    But generally speaking, I'd say that 9-feet-tall masturbating bunnies are usually a bad idea.
    On *stage*, yes.

  7. #37
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    Sure. We agree on the essential ingredient: talent. I've recently praised extensively a Regie production of TLOTICOKATMF which spooked our friend Clayton. It had blood, graphic violence, rape with forceful oral sex, machine guns... but was quite successful. So, sure, as much as a traditional production *can* have the clichés of heavy curtains and candelabra and party gowns and still be good, a Regie production *can* have the clichés above and still be good, as long as talent is the main ingredient.

    But generally speaking, I'd say that 9-feet-tall masturbating bunnies are usually a bad idea.

    And of course, Brünnhilde delivering a baby at the end of Götterdämmerung is definitely an abomination and I'd love to see a law voted by the Danish Parliament establishing that directors who engage in such heresies are to be sentenced to 25 years of re-education, being daily attached to a chair à la Clockwork Orange with their eyelids forcefully open, and exposed to Zeffirelli's Bohème performed by some really fat people who park and bark, over and over and over! I'm thinking of running for office and sponsoring such law.

    Ok, sorry. What means TLOTICOKATMF?

  8. #38
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoffmann View Post
    Ok, sorry. What means TLOTICOKATMF?
    That exquisite operatic masterpiece, The Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh and the Maiden Fevroniya, by our good Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.

    The production in question is this one:

    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  9. #39
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amfortas View Post
    On *stage*, yes.
    What? On stage and everywhere. I certainly wouldn't want to bump into one of those!
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  10. #40
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    What? On stage and everywhere. I certainly wouldn't want to bump into one of those!
    Surprisingly, it's not as bad as you might think.

  11. #41
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Warsaw Opera are staging Rigoletto. Quote " ...The show is designed mostly for those viewers who are not fans of the contemporary Regietheater known for its indulgence when it comes to letting fantasy run wild..."

    Traditional stagings becoming an selling point?!
    "Every theatre is an insane asylum, but an opera theatre is the ward for the incurables."

    FRANZ SCHALK, attributed, Losing the Plot in Opera: Myths and Secrets of the World's Great Operas

  12. #42
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Traditional staging fights back!

    I'm sure that because of all the excess of extreme artistic license distributed in the opera theatres it is going to become a selling point and we will see more traditional coming back (maybe or hopefully)

  13. #43
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    I recall one of the General Directors of a German theater making a statement to the effect that people shouldn't just come to the opera to be entertained, and found myself asking what would be so wrong with that. I wonder if it's ever dawned on people like him that such an attitude -- that opera is Art and must have a Deeper Meaning beyond mere entertainment -- is just the sort of intimidating mindset that's frightening some people away from opera. Of course, opera has an important history of exploring social problems and political injustice, and there will always be a place for works and productions that do offer audiences some important food for thought. But it can also provide entertainment, and I don't consider that something to be ashamed of. Wouldn't it be interesting if one of the best ways to attract new audiences to opera would be to stage more traditional (but not the old stand-and-deliver) productions?

  14. #44
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    I recall one of the General Directors of a German theater making a statement to the effect that people shouldn't just come to the opera to be entertained, and found myself asking what would be so wrong with that. I wonder if it's ever dawned on people like him that such an attitude -- that opera is Art and must have a Deeper Meaning beyond mere entertainment -- is just the sort of intimidating mindset that's frightening some people away from opera. Of course, opera has an important history of exploring social problems and political injustice, and there will always be a place for works and productions that do offer audiences some important food for thought. But it can also provide entertainment, and I don't consider that something to be ashamed of. Wouldn't it be interesting if one of the best ways to attract new audiences to opera would be to stage more traditional (but not the old stand-and-deliver) productions?
    It is definitely possible to do traditional but carefully directed - ie with excellent Personenregie, (I love German compound words). The famous Glyndebourne Cosi is a wonderful example of that. The problem is that it often means "let's pay more attention to the sets than the people" and then you end up with something like the Met's last Rusalka, which bored me so rigid I didn't last the course, rare for me as I have good opera stamina. I'd rather watch any Regie Rusalka than to sit through any of that again, which felt like being pulled into a large overstuffed sofa by Disney's version of Tinkerbell.
    Natalie

  15. #45
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    The problem is that it often means "let's pay more attention to the sets than the people" . . .
    This can happen in less traditional productions as well--Lepage's Met Ring Cycle comes to mind.

    Give me an intelligent director with real insight into the opera, and chances are I'll happily follow down whatever path--traditional or Regie--they lead me.

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