Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 19 of 19

Thread: OTF - The Old switch-a-roo

          
   
    Bookmark and Share
  1. #16
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Detroit MI
    Posts
    3,432
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Ann Lander (sospiro) View Post
    I think it would be fairly easy for me to enjoy a new opera without knowing the synopsis because I'm used to opera. I took a total newbie to see L'elisir d'amore. She had no idea of the story and even though it's a simple plot, she only took in about half of it which was a shame. She said if she'd had a rough idea of what it was about before she went, she'd have enjoyed it more.
    This performance didn't have subtitles? That should tell the story, but she should have read a synopsis first, which would come with the program. Was she just not willing to put in the effort?
    "Ah,non credea mirarti si presto estinto, o fiore." --Bellini, La Sonnambula (also written on his tomb).

  2. #17
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    4,221
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Florestan View Post
    This performance didn't have subtitles? That should tell the story, but she should have read a synopsis first, which would come with the program. Was she just not willing to put in the effort?
    Yes it had surtitles but she said that by the time she had read them but before she understood what was happening, the scene had changed and don't forget the surtitles are only the translation of the words being sung. Before we went I loaned her a box set with libretto and a DVD but she said she didn't have time to listen/watch either.

    I'm not blaming her and it highlights why opera is seen as daunting for some people.

    Personally, if I'm planning on seeing a new (to me) opera, I just love getting stuck in with homework.

  3. #18
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Midwestern U.S.
    Posts
    3,194
    Post Thanks / Like
    To me, inclusion of the synopsis in the program is similar to the use of supertitle translations in that it leaves the choice up to the individual audience members. A translation is available for those who want it, but can be ignored by those who don't feel in need of it. The synopsis is in the program for those who want to read it before the performance begins; those who don't wish to do so can simply ignore it.

  4. #19
    Senior Member Involved Member itywltmt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario
    Posts
    258
    Post Thanks / Like

    Lightbulb Verdi: Don Carlos (Sung in the original French)

    Let me pop out of my summer hiatus for one OTF post, this one in the “Old Switch-a-roo” tradition, looking at operas that are adapted in other languages.

    Some of us are familiar with Don Carlo, a Verdi’s longest opera with an enduring duet



    It turns out the opera was commissioned and produced by the Paris Opera and given its premiere at the Salle Le Peletier on 11 March 1867. Developed with both a French and an Italian libretto, the first performance in Italian was given at Covent Garden in London in June 1867. The first Italian version given in Italy was in Bologna in October 1867.
    Over the following twenty years, cuts and additions were made to the opera, resulting in a number of versions being available to directors and conductors.

    Revised again by Verdi, it was given in Naples in November/December 1872. Finally, two other versions were prepared: the first was seen in Milan in January 1884 (in which the four acts were based on some original French text which was then translated). That is now known as the "Milan version", while the second—also sanctioned by the composer—became the "Modena version" and was presented in that city in December 1886. It restored the "Fontainebleau" first act to the Milan four-act version.

    No other Verdi opera exists in so many versions.

    The version I’m sharing today is from the BBC Opera Rara series, originally broadcast in the 1970s. In some ways it is the most important: it comes closest to what Verdi had in mind for his extended masterpiece. What is more, it is given by a cast of largely Francophone singers, who make it sound – at last – like the truly French work it is.

    According to a detailed review of the text sung in this broadcast version, we have the complete Fontainebleau scene, a short solo for Posa at the beginning of Scene 2, a longer version of the Posa-Philippe scene in Act 2, the costume-changing of Elisabeth and Eboli, their duet before “O don fatal” in Act 3, the whole of the ballet, the full Insurrection scene, and the longest version of the finale.

    That adds up to almost four hours. No wonder Verdi either made or sanctioned cuts!

    The principal singers, as I stated in a post a few weeks ago, are French-Canadian. The musical direction is poised but the sound quality is uneven.

    The links below are to both the YouTube clips of the disc and my own montages (for later use) into two large tracks.

    Happy summer listening!

    Giuseppe VERDI (1813-1901)

    Don Carlos (1867)
    Opera in five acts, French Libretto: Joseph Méry and Camille Du Locle on Schiller’s dramatic poem ‘Don Carlos, Infant von Spanien’ (1785-86)

    1867 Paris version sung in French and complete with music unused at the first production

    CAST
    Philippe II (King of Spain), Joseph Rouleau (bass);
    Don Carlos (Infante of Spain), André Turp (ten);
    Rodrigue (Marquis de Posa), Robert Savoie (bar);
    Le Grand Inquisiteur, Richard Van Allan (bass);
    Elisabeth de Valois (Philip's Queen), Edith Tremblay (sop);
    Princesse Eboli (Elisabeth's lady-in-waiting), Michelle Vilma (mezzo);
    Thiabault (Elisabeth's page), Gillian Knight (sop);
    Le Comte de Lerme (A Royal Herald), Emile Belcourt (ten);
    An Old Monk, Robert Lloyd (bass);
    A Voice from Heaven, Prudence Lloyd (sop)
    BBC Singers; BBC Concert Orchestra/John Matheson

    rec. 22 April 1972 before invited audience, Camden Theatre, London.
    First broadcast: BBC, 10 June 1973

    OPERA RARA ORCV 305

    Synopsis – https://www.opera-arias.com/verdi/don-carlo/synopsis/
    Libretto - http://kareol.es/obras/doncarlos/acto1f.htm (This may not completely fi the opera dialogue as the performance reintroduces missing portions)

    YouTubehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...rNjPkVCLvdqybe
    Internet Archive - https://archive.org/details/part1_201908

  5. Likes MAuer, Ann Lander (sospiro) liked this post
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


free html visitor counters
hit counter




Official Media Partners of Opera Carolina

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Opera Carolina

Official Media Partners of NC Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of North Carolina Opera

Official Media Partners of Greensboro Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Greensboro Opera

Official Media Partners of The A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute and Piedmont Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of The A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute
of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts and Piedmont Opera

Official Media Partners of Asheville Lyric Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Asheville Lyric Opera

Official Media Partners of UNC Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of UNC Opera
Dept. of Music, UNC-Chapel Hill College of Arts and Sciences

www.operalively.com

VISIT WWW.OPERALIVELY.COM FOR ALL YOUR OPERA NEEDS