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Thread: Albums/CDs by individual opera singers (thread is not for complete operas)

          
   
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  1. #31
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    I'm moving it and doing some clean-up deleting old and dead YouTube links and putting it in the index, will also do a redirect from the Singers section so that all individual CD reviews hopefully come here.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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  3. #32
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    A present from Santa and very good it is too.




    Duets - Rolando Villazón & Ildar Abdrazakov



    https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/cl...dar-abdrazakov
    "Every theatre is an insane asylum, but an opera theatre is the ward for the incurables."

    FRANZ SCHALK, attributed, Losing the Plot in Opera: Myths and Secrets of the World's Great Operas

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  5. #33
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ann Lander (sospiro) View Post
    A present from Santa and very good it is too.




    Duets - Rolando Villazón & Ildar Abdrazakov



    https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/cl...dar-abdrazakov
    Those guys have a lot of fun together. Did you see them on FB pretending to be ballet dancers?
    Natalie

  6. #34
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    Those guys have a lot of fun together. Did you see them on FB pretending to be ballet dancers?
    I did!!

    Ildar Nureyev and Rolando Baryshnikov
    Last edited by Ann Lander (sospiro); December 26th, 2017 at 07:30 AM.
    "Every theatre is an insane asylum, but an opera theatre is the ward for the incurables."

    FRANZ SCHALK, attributed, Losing the Plot in Opera: Myths and Secrets of the World's Great Operas

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  8. #35
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ann Lander (sospiro) View Post
    I did!!

    Ildar Nureyev and Rolando Baryshnikov
    He he more like dance of the sugar-plum heffalumps, bless them.
    Natalie

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  10. #36
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Anna Netrebko with Antonio Pappano - Verismo album

    Name:  61qDEQJUGBL._SX425_.jpg
Views: 92
Size:  60.4 KB

    Simply gorgeous, Anna displaying to maximum effect her darker, fuller voice that she acquired after a few years now separate her from the light "...ina" roles.

    This is a very beautiful CD, indispensable for admirers of this extraordinary singer (and everybody else).
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

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  12. #37
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    Anna Netrebko with Antonio Pappano - Verismo album

    Name:  61qDEQJUGBL._SX425_.jpg
Views: 92
Size:  60.4 KB

    Simply gorgeous, Anna displaying to maximum effect her darker, fuller voice that she acquired after a few years now separate her from the light "...ina" roles.

    This is a very beautiful CD, indispensable for admirers of this extraordinary singer (and everybody else).
    Under the small risk of squandering my good stance with Anna (if by any chance her publicist or herself still check Opera Lively from time to time - rather unlikely, so removed we are now from her two interviews with us), I must say that I spoke too soon about this CD. The thing is, I heard half of it, got busy, couldn't continue, but I was so impressed with the stratospheric quality of her singing, that I posted the two phrases above. Then I found the time to go back to it and listen to the rest.

    So, there are 16 tracks. I had listened to the first 8. Gorgeous. I resumed the listening with the 9th track, and then, big surprise: from there until the end except for track 15, Anna's husband sings long stretches. Well, I hadn't even noticed that he shared this CD with her - observe that his name is nowhere to be seen on the cover.

    It's a disaster. Sorry, dear Anna, but his voice is unpleasant, raspy, thin, and his technique is poor. He simply ruins the second half of this CD.

    Even Anna doesn't sing as beautifully in the second half. She seems to restrain herself, maybe even subconsciously. Maybe on some level she doesn't want to smother and overwhelm him. Still does, though.

    Does anybody want to guess which track is the best one of the second half? Yep, track 15, the one where he is not singing and she's all by herself again.

    So what we have here is a world-class singer at the peak of her extraordinary ability, arguably the best soprano in activity, sharing a CD with a very mediocre singer.

    We all know that she would NEVER have picked such a weak singing partner for this important CD, if the choice had to be dictated exclusively by artistic reasons. The only reason why he is here, adding his substandard voice to this fabulous soprano's, is that he is married to the lady.

    I wish Anna would stop shoving her husband down our throats.

    There would be much better tenors to pick... Where is Herr Kaufmann when we need him? Or Piotr Beczala? Or Javier Camarena? Or Roberto Alagna? Or Vittorio Grigolò? Or Marcelo Álvarez? Or many others? Why oh why do we have to endure Yusif Eyvasov?
    Last edited by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva); March 9th, 2018 at 11:59 AM.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  13. #38
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Harsh words but true.

    Also Anna can guarantee bums on seats so she's able to request that husband comes too if she's engaged by a house. If you check her recent engagements, husband is often on the bill too.

    Anna is singing Lady M and husband is singing Macduff in the forthcoming Macbeth at ROH. I have tickets and will report back.
    "Every theatre is an insane asylum, but an opera theatre is the ward for the incurables."

    FRANZ SCHALK, attributed, Losing the Plot in Opera: Myths and Secrets of the World's Great Operas

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  15. #39
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    I heard both of them in Auckland at a concert and, while he is rather endearing, he is a can belto kind of guy. Not at all in her league.
    Natalie

  16. #40
    Junior Member Recent member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    When this recital first appeared in 1975, Scotto had been absent from the catalogues for some time. She was principally known on record for her Butterfly under Barbirolli (recorded for EMI in 1966) and for Mimi, Violetta, Gilda and Lucia (all recorded in the early 1960s for DG).

    Butterfly was her calling card for many years, and the recording has remained one of the most recommendable (though, save for Liu in the Molinari-Pradelli Turandot, recorded in 1961, she appears not to have made any further complete opera recordings for EMI until she recorded Abigaille under Muti in 1977).

    She first made her mark deputising as Amina in Edinburgh for Callas, who, in poor vocal health at the time, had refused to sing an extra uncontracted performance that La Scala had tried to thurst upon her. That was in 1957 and it would appear that, though she had considerable success on stage, recording companies were not so quick on the uptake. She herself has admitted that she could be a bit prima donna-ish in a "my way or no way" sort of manner, until she met her husband, Lorenzo Anselmi, who, according to Scotto, helped her to become more professional, and think more about the music.

    She was at first known as a coloratura, but even in the early 1960s, John Steane notes that her high notes did not seem to come easily and could have a hard and pinched quality. She also had a great success as Butterfly, the role in which she had made her Met debut, but it soon became clear that this was the only repertoire Bing would call on her for. He refused to offer her anything else so she was absent from their schedules for a long time, returning in 1974 to sing Elena in I Vespri Siciliani, under Levine who became her champion. For many years, she was the Met's house soprano, singing a completely new repertoire, which included Verdi roles like Leonora in Il Trovatore, Desdemona, Luisa Miller and Lady Macbeth.

    This Verdi recital also marked the beginning of a new, fairly intensive recording schedule for her. In the ten years since her recording of Madama Butterfly the hardness on top has become more noticeable, and many of the louder notes above the stave are quite strident. There are however compensations in her musicality, her dramatic awareness, her deep legato and the firmness of the line. Then there is the added attraction of her attention to detail and her intelligent use of the words, though occasionally there is a lack of spontaneity. Art does not always conceal art.

    There is a good mixture here of the familiar and the not so well known. In the former camp would be Lida's aria and cabaletta from La Battaglia di Legnano, a fairly conventional piece whose cabaletta is nonetheless energetically exciting, and which Scotto attacks head on. There is a slight suspicion that the voice is a little small for the other early works here (Nabucco and I Lombardi), but she has an innate feeling for Verdian style and the cavatinas of both are beautifully moulded, the cabalettas propulsive and exciting. The voice takes on a lovely melancholy tinta for Elena's Arrigo, ah parli a un core, which lies mostly in the middle register, though she eschews the written low F# in the cadenza, taking a higher alternative, and sings a bright and breezy Merce, dilette amiche. Best of all, probably because neither takes he much above the stave, are Violetta's Addio, del passato, the reading of the letter absolutely heart-wrenching, and Desdemona's Willow Song and Ave Maria, which is alive to every dramatic contrast, her singing full of anxious foreboding. Soon after this she would make a most touching Desdemona both on stage at the Met and on record in Domingo's first recording.

    Some may prefer a richer voice for this music, but few who are more vocally endowed sing with such specificity, such attention to the meaning of the text, such musicality and appreciation of Verdian style. Where other sopranos, like Souliotis and Sass, can be accused of being copycat Callases, Scotto can be said to have absorbed the lessons of Callas without losing her own individuality. This is a very good recital.
    "If the public could understand, as we do, how deeply and utterly musical Callas is, they would be stunned." Victor De Sabata

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  18. #41
    Junior Member Recent member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Issued to mark the one hundredth anniversary of Schwarzkopf’s birth in 2015, this fantastic 31 disc set brings together all the recital discs Schwarzkopf made in the LP age with her husband Walter Legge between the years 1952 and 1974, adding the live 1953 Wolf recital from Salzburg, with Furtwängler and the farewell to Gerlald Moore at the Royal Festival Hall in 1967, in which she shares the platform with Victoria De Los Angeles and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau. It is a considerable achievement, covering operatic excerpts and a huge range of Lieder and song, both with orchestra and piano. It is not quite the full story, for their was to be one further recital to come, made for Decca in 1977 and 1979, and simply called To My Friends.

    A fuller review of this box set on my blog https://tsaraslondon.wordpress.com/2...als-1952-1974/
    "If the public could understand, as we do, how deeply and utterly musical Callas is, they would be stunned." Victor De Sabata

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  20. #42
    Junior Member Recent member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    This Handel recital, which showcases the talents of Natalie Dessay, concentrates solely on the music Handel wrote for Cleopatra in his Giulio Cesare, and even includes music he wrote but later cut from the full opera. Variety is provided, by the orchestra (the excellent Le Concert d'Astrée under Emmanuelle Haïm) contributing a couple of orchestral interludes, and by Sonia Prina as Caesar, whose contributions, however are restricted to a few lines of recitative and the final duet.

    It is quite interesting to hear side by side, as we do here, Handel's first and final thoughts on certain scenes, so the heroic Per dar vita all'idol mio gave way to the grieving Se pietà di me non senti, whilst the lilting siciliano of Troppo crudele siete was dropped in favour of the intensely moving, and justly famous Piangerò.

    Dessay is on top form, stunningly agile in the florid music such as Da tempeste il legno infrante, playfully seductive in V'adoro pupille, movingly heartfelt in Piangerò.

    Le Concert d'Astrée under Emmanuelle Haïm, offer superb support. This is no replacement for a performance of the complete opera, of course, but nonetheless a wonderful distillation of Dessay's Cleopatra, a role she performed with great success at the Palais Garnier in Paris, shortly after making this record.
    "If the public could understand, as we do, how deeply and utterly musical Callas is, they would be stunned." Victor De Sabata

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