Thread: Opera Small Talk

          
   
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  1. #1486
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Povero Buoso View Post
    Did Wagner write anything below epoch length?
    Der fliegende Holländer is only about 2.5 hours long.
    Since that night at the Polka, I don't understand you, Sheriff.
    --Ashby, La Fanciulla del West

  2. #1487
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    You might also look into the more melodious of Richard Strauss's operas: Der Rosenkavalier, Ariadne auf Naxos, Arabella, Capriccio.

  3. #1488
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    I too would suggest Lohengrin; that was the first Wagner opera I heard after having mainly listened to Verdi, Bellini and Donizetti. It is a very romantic opera with beautiful melodies and I fell in love straight away. If you can, watch the Nagano. It is one of the favourites of the forum (... err... i think...) but it is such a popular work that there are many, many good recordings (check the favourite recordings thread).

    Name:  Lohengrin - Baden-Baden Festspielhaus June 2006, Kent Nagano, Nikolaus Lehnhoff.jpg
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    Wagner: Lohengrin
    Recorded live in the Festspielhaus, Baden-Baden in June 2006.
    Klaus Florian Vogt (Lohengrin), Solveig Kringelborn (Elsa), Waltraud Meier (Ortrud), Tom Fox (Telramund), Hans-Peter König (King Heinrich), Roman Trekel (Herald)
    EuropaChorAkademie Mainz, Chorus of the Opéra national de Lyon & Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Kent Nagano (musical director) & Nikolaus Lehnhoff (stage director)

    I would also recommend Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Beautiful, funny and again full melodies that reaches the parts that other beers just don't. I don't think it is long at all; it is consistently great composition all the way through and I most of the time find that I am unsatisfied with one listening and normally listen to two or three recordings at a time (I love this work so much, I have many, many recordings).
    Again check the favourite recordings thread but if you can, watch the Glyndebourne.

    Name:  Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg – Glyndebourne 2011, Vladmir Jurowski, David McVicar.jpg
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    Wagner: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg
    Recorded live at Glyndebourne, Lewes, July 2011
    Gerald Finley (Hans Sachs), Anna Gabler (Eva), Johannes Martin Kränzle (Sixtus Beckmesser), Marco Jentzsch (Walther von Stolzing), Topi Lehtipuu (David), Michaela Selinger (Magdalene), Alastair Miles (Veit Pogner), Henry Waddington (Fritz Kothner), Mats Almgren (Nightwatchman), Colin Judson (Kunz Vogelgesang), Andrew Slater (Konrad Nachtigall), Alasdair Elliott (Balthasar Zorn), Adrian Thompson (Ulrich Eisslinger), Daniel Norman (Augustin Moser), Robert Poulton (Hermann Ortel), Maxim Mikailov (Hans Schwarz), Graeme Broadbent (Hans Foltz)
    London Philharmonic Orchestra, The Glyndebourne Chorus, Vladimir Jurowski (conductor) & David McVicar (stage director)

  4. #1489
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Excellent DVD choices, Clayton!

  5. #1490
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    ah... came across them by the excellent pointers from this wonderful forum with such wide and in-depth knowledge...

  6. #1491
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Elizabeth Watts, who sang a brilliant Minerva in the recent Il ritorno d'Ulisse in patria, has written a very informative piece on Alessandro Scarlatti for The Guardian.

    Everyone is entitled to their opinion and if comments are invited, entitled to submit their opinion but some of the comments on this article are offensive.
    "You may do it extempore,
    for it is nothing but roaring."

    Peter Quince

  7. #1492
    Senior Member Veteran Member Povero Buoso's Avatar
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    I've decided to watch a new Verdi tomorrow but am agonizing over which one Otello,La Forza del Destino or Simon Boccanegra
    "Non sono in vena" Rodolfo summing up P.B's feelings on his dissertation.

  8. #1493
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Povero Buoso View Post
    I've decided to watch a new Verdi tomorrow but am agonizing over which one Otello,La Forza del Destino or Simon Boccanegra
    ooh, the tough choices in life...

    Otello was the first opera I saw on LD and it was mind boggling (both the LD and the opera)

    I have a small issue with La Forza but I can't tell you yet as I do not want to spoil it but the music is so good

    I can let Sospiro do the sales for SB but it should be a high priority...



    sorry I couldn't help

  9. #1494
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Oh for goodness sake Clayton stop dithering.

    OTELLO. Domingo not Antonenko.
    Natalie

  10. #1495
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Povero Buoso View Post
    I've decided to watch a new Verdi tomorrow but am agonizing over which one Otello,La Forza del Destino or Simon Boccanegra
    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    ooh, the tough choices in life...

    Otello was the first opera I saw on LD and it was mind boggling (both the LD and the opera)

    I have a small issue with La Forza but I can't tell you yet as I do not want to spoil it but the music is so good

    I can let Sospiro do the sales for SB but it should be a high priority...



    sorry I couldn't help
    Quote Originally Posted by Soave_Fanciulla View Post
    Oh for goodness sake Clayton stop dithering.

    OTELLO. Domingo not Antonenko.



    It has to be Simon Boccanegra!

    For CD this is my recommendation



    I haven't found a DVD which I really like yet but this is excellent (don't think it's in DVD format).

    "You may do it extempore,
    for it is nothing but roaring."

    Peter Quince

  11. #1496
    Senior Member Veteran Member Povero Buoso's Avatar
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    So 1 for Boccanegra and 1 for Otello at least the choice has been narrowed down a bit. Wait just watched the first 30 seconds of the Boccanegra clip.... Yeah Boccanegra today!
    "Non sono in vena" Rodolfo summing up P.B's feelings on his dissertation.

  12. #1497
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    An open letter to Brian Salesky, Executive Director & Conductor, Knoxville Opera from vocal coach Claudia Friedlander.

    Maestro Selesky,

    Auditions for Knoxville Opera’s Education/Outreach Program performances of La Bohème posted to YAPTracker today. Under the Restrictions heading you wrote “Knoxville Opera will cast age appropriate, attractive artists in these roles.”


    The full letter.

    I agree with Claudia Friedlander but sadly it's a sign of the times.
    "You may do it extempore,
    for it is nothing but roaring."

    Peter Quince

  13. #1498
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Amfortas's Avatar
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    Regarding the company's stated goal to cast "attractive artists," I agree, with Friedlander, that "such language has no place in an audition notice."

    Nonetheless, I believe it's widely understood that physical appearance can be a factor in opera casting, as in any theatrical production. And why not? It can certainly be a factor in how audiences react to a performance--as witnessed in many of the comments we read here. It would be naive to expect producers to ignore the issue entirely.

    There shouldn't be a stated policy on attractiveness, but that doesn't mean appearance isn't, or shouldn't be, a consideration.

  14. #1499
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    Well, when a singer "hits the big time", he/she is most often well into their 30s. Makeup can do a fair amount to gild the lily when the singer is cast as a much younger person, but only for so long. Having lived through times when older singers overstayed their welcomes, I think that the "willful suspension of disbelief" concept suffers from overaged singers portraying young people. And age brings issues of expanding waistlines and ... em ... sagging body parts. But if the voice is sublime, it sublimates a lot of sags.

  15. #1500
    Senior Member Veteran Member Povero Buoso's Avatar
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    I think age is of more importance than attractiveness at least for believability's sake. A late twenties early thirties can perform physically and vocally Gilda from Rigoletto with a convincing air. After this it requires extreme suspension of disbelief to maintain Gilda's innocence in the mind of the listener/watcher unless the performance is really superb or the singer surprisingly youthful looking as just one example. Attractiveness does not come into the situation as much as looking youthful or appearing convincingly youthful does .
    "Non sono in vena" Rodolfo summing up P.B's feelings on his dissertation.

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