Thread: Opera Small Talk

          
   
    Bookmark and Share
  1. #2236
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Midwestern U.S.
    Posts
    2,935
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    Ha! maybe that's where I heard of it. Maybe MAuer has mentioned it somewhere here.
    https://operalively.com/forums/showt...ncinnati-Opera

    In the meantime, I think this opera may have been performed at the Chicago Lyric Opera.

  2. #2237
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    3,522
    Post Thanks / Like
    I got 13/15 right. I am annoyed because I should have gotten the other two right. I marked the wrong answer too quickly on one and hit next too soon and the other (Die Lustige Witwe) was thinking of another opera and indicated 'Weiber'. Geez.

    No wonder my SATs didn't get me into Harvard...

  3. #2238
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    9,824
    Post Thanks / Like
    15/15, happy that they had a good number of contemporary operas.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  4. Likes Soave_Fanciulla liked this post
  5. #2239
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    5,829
    Post Thanks / Like
    14/15 - put Fallen angel in probs because I had just be watching Dima in the Demon.
    Natalie

  6. Likes Ann Lander (sospiro), MAuer liked this post
  7. #2240
    Member Recent member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    41
    Post Thanks / Like
    I'm going to a screening of the Metropolitan Opera's Turandot at the weekend.

  8. Likes Hoffmann, Ann Lander (sospiro), MAuer liked this post
  9. #2241
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Midwestern U.S.
    Posts
    2,935
    Post Thanks / Like
    Thanks to the DVD of the Dresden Ariadne auf Naxos I've been watching, I finally understand the significance of the costume Jonas Kaufmann wore as Bacchus in the 2012 Salzburg Festival production of the opera. In the Prologue, there is a moment when the Composer insists that Bacchus is a god and not “a clown in a leopard suit.” JK is certainly no clown, but his suit in the Salzburg production definitely had a leopard pattern, including the black silhouette of a leopard on the jacket front. Unfortunately, he was singing in the original 1912 version of the work; the Composer only appears in the 1916 revision that is the standard version of the opera. Unless one was familiar with the revision, one wouldn’t have picked up on the allusion in JK’s costume. (As indeed I didn’t, until viewing the 1916 version.)
    Last edited by MAuer; August 23rd, 2018 at 10:50 AM. Reason: Getty Images are copyrighted, so I deleted it

  10. #2242
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    3,522
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    Thanks to the DVD of the Dresden Ariadne auf Naxos I've been watching, I finally understand the significance of the costume Jonas Kaufmann wore as Bacchus in the 2012 Salzburg Festival production of the opera. In the Prologue, there is a moment when the Composer insists that Bacchus is a god and not “a clown in a leopard suit.” JK is certainly no clown, but his suit definitely has a leopard pattern – and though not visible in this photo, the black silhouette of a leopard on the jacket front. Unfortunately, he was singing in the original 1912 version of the work; the Composer only appears in the 1916 revision that is the standard version of the opera. Unless one was familiar with the revision, one wouldn’t have picked up on the allusion in JK’s costume. (As indeed I didn’t, until viewing the 1916 version.)
    Hmmm. I wonder where can I find one of those cool leopard suits?
    Last edited by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva); August 22nd, 2018 at 10:39 PM. Reason: Getty Images are copyrighted so I deleted it

  11. Likes Nemorino liked this post
  12. #2243
    Senior Member Involved Member Nemorino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    194
    Post Thanks / Like
    A few weeks ago I made my 3rd annual trip to the Santa Fe Opera, a very easy vacation destination for me to get to and a city I love to visit. From least to best:

    ARIADNE AUF NAXOS - *** - A bit disappointing; the production looked sleek, but there wasn't a whole lot going on with the characters and it was dull. The singing, too, was not as good as it probably needs to be to pull this opera off. It requires, I think, some operatic "magic" to make up for a lack of drama.

    DOCTOR ATOMIC - ***(*) - This opera also suffers from a static libretto that is at times brilliant, but at times a real slog. This seems barely an opera, but more a mournful historical meditation. I *really* love John Adams' music, but as I become aware of his opera works I think his style is more suited to real drama than to this kind of Parsifalian wallowing. And this new production by Peter Sellars (also the librettist) was extremely minimalistic. What was powerful was REALLY powerful. Los Alamos is only 30 minutes away, and Sellars really got the locals involved in this production. Members of nearby Pueblo tribes performed a Corn Dance onstage before the opera as a sort of consecration. And actual Downwinders - people who lost family members to cancer caused by the Trinity bomb blast - appeared onstage during a scene when General Groves dismisses any concern for the consequences of nuclear fallout. Moments like these were powerful, but other scenes were a real drag and I know a lot of people around me in the audience had a hard time making it through this show. *** as an opera; **** as a unique & provocative community healing event.

    L'ITALIANA IN ALGERI - **** - This 15-year-old, well-traveled pop-up book production is delightful. This was by far the best all-around cast this year. Daniela Mack was a fiery, irresistible Isabella; Scott Conner was a hilarious Mustafa. And Patrick Carfizzi stole a few scenes as Taddeo with a wonderfully resonant bass voice.

    CANDIDE - ***** - My #1 priority this season was to see the new Laurent Pelly production, and it did not disappoint. I was a little bit worried when I heard that he was repeating the aesthetic he's done several times before of backdrops (and costumes) of books and/or pages from the opera's "text". Well, *this* time he partnered with 59 Productions to add amazing, colorful projections onto the pages of this set (59 Productions worked on the London Olympics' opening ceremony, and the gorgeous displays on the Opening Night of this year's BBC Proms), and the result was gorgeous and innovative. I was continually surprised and in awe of this show. This was my first Candide, and it has a reputation of being a problematic show, but... based on this production I have no idea how that could possibly be the case. It was the funniest opera production I've ever seen (although, it is also often bleak and blasphemous, which is not going to be to everyone's taste), and easily in my Top 10 of... well, any live performance I've ever been to. I hope this show will travel at least as widely as Pelly's Cendrillon. This whole post really exists to say: If you ever get a chance to see it, don't miss it.

  13. #2244
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,986
    Post Thanks / Like
    Donizetti's Torquato Tasso premiered on 09 September 1933. I understand the last act consists of a mad scene for a baritone. On my shopping list.

    Name:  tt.jpg
Views: 20
Size:  95.2 KB
    " if you are interested in something, no matter what it is, go at it at full speed ahead. Embrace it with both arms, hug it, love it, and above all become passionate about it."
    Roald Dahl

  14. #2245
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    5,829
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Ann Lander (sospiro) View Post
    Donizetti's Torquato Tasso premiered on 09 September 1933. I understand the last act consists of a mad scene for a baritone. On my shopping list.
    My kind of mad scene 100%
    Natalie

  15. Likes Ann Lander (sospiro), MAuer liked this post

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


free html visitor counters
hit counter




Official Media Partners of Opera Carolina

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Opera Carolina

Official Media Partners of NC Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of North Carolina Opera

Official Media Partners of Greensboro Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Greensboro Opera

Official Media Partners of The A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute and Piedmont Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of The A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute
of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts and Piedmont Opera

Official Media Partners of Asheville Lyric Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of Asheville Lyric Opera

Official Media Partners of UNC Opera

Opera Lively is the Official Media Partner of UNC Opera
Dept. of Music, UNC-Chapel Hill College of Arts and Sciences

www.operalively.com

VISIT WWW.OPERALIVELY.COM FOR ALL YOUR OPERA NEEDS