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Thread: Our 13 favourite operas

          
   
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  1. #91
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    1) Verdi: Don Carlos
    2) Verdi: Aida
    3) Mozart: Cosi Fan Tutte
    4) Wagner: Der Ring Des Nibelungen
    5) Donizetti: Lucia Di Lammermoor
    6) Verdi: La Traviata
    7) Rossini: William Tell
    7) Puccini: Suor Angelica
    8) Puccini: La Boheme
    9) Verdi: Rigoletto
    10) Mascagni: Cavalleria Rusticana
    11) Gluck: Orpheo et Eurydice
    12) Berlioz: Les Troyens
    13) Bizet: Carmen

    The top ten are fairly sure, the last three I could have easily considered: Massenet's Werther, or Donizetti's La Fille Du Regiment, or L'elisir or Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin

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  3. #92
    Member Recent member CaptainVere's Avatar
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    My 13 changed a bit recently so


    1. Don Giovanni
    2. Billy Budd
    3. Don Carlo
    4. The Ring
    5. Il trovatore
    6. La forza del destino
    7. Un ballo in maschera
    8. Eugene Onegin
    9. Tosca
    10. Lucia di Lammermoor
    11. Die Zauberflöte
    12. Turandot
    13. Peter Grimes


    Don Carlo knocked the Ring out of the top 3 and Onegin skyrocketed into my top 10 thanks to that magical Met production.

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  5. #93
    Opera Lively Staff Member Top Contributor Member Hoffmann's Avatar
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    Looking thru my earlier entry, my list has changed only a little - mostly to allow for my increased awe of Rossini:

    (In no particular order and as of today...)

    Der Ring des Nibelungen
    Lohengrin
    Tristan und Isolde
    Le Nozze di Figaro
    Norma
    Die Tote Stadt
    Semiramide
    La Donna del Lago
    Der Rosenkavalier
    I Puritani
    Don Carlos
    Macbeth
    Die Entführung aus dem Serail

    I would note, for the record, that I continue to work on improving my appreciation of contemporary opera, but nothing yet has broken thru into the top thirteen.

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  7. #94
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Florestan View Post
    Mine as of 2018:

    La Sonnambula
    Martha (Flotow)
    L'Amico Fritz
    Fidelio
    Der fliegende Hollander
    Maria Stuarda
    Capuleti e i Montecchi
    La Fanciulla del West
    Il Trovatore
    Giulio Cesare
    Boris Godunov
    Eugene Onegin
    Der Ring des Nibelungen
    REVISED LIST:

    La Sonnambula
    Martha (Flotow)
    L'Amico Fritz
    Bartered Bride
    Der fliegende Hollander
    Roberto Devereux
    Don Pasquale

    La Fanciulla del West
    Meistersinger
    Tannhauser
    La fille du Regiment

    Eugene Onegin
    Der Ring des Nibelungen
    "Music is enought for a whole lifetime--but a lifetime is not enough for music." --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

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  9. #95
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    I looked back at my old list and realized that it's changed very little since then.

    1. Fidelio (Beethoven)
    2. Rigoletto (Verdi)
    3. Die Zauberflöte (Mozart)
    4. La Clemenza di Tito (Mozart)
    5. Il Trovatore (Verdi)
    6. Anna Bolena (Donizetti)
    7. La Traviata (Verdi)
    8. Tosca (Puccini)
    9. Madama Butterfly (Puccini)
    10. Lohengrin (Wagner)
    11. Lucia di Lammermoor (Donizetti)
    12. Leonora (Paer)
    13. Don Giovanni (Mozart)

    The only difference is that I'd like to squeeze Bellini's I Puritani in there someplace, and possibly Verdi's I due Foscari.

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  11. #96
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    I looked back at my old list and realized that it's changed very little since then.

    1. Fidelio (Beethoven)
    2. Rigoletto (Verdi)
    3. Die Zauberflöte (Mozart)
    4. La Clemenza di Tito (Mozart)
    5. Il Trovatore (Verdi)
    6. Anna Bolena (Donizetti)
    7. La Traviata (Verdi)
    8. Tosca (Puccini)
    9. Madama Butterfly (Puccini)
    10. Lohengrin (Wagner)
    11. Lucia di Lammermoor (Donizetti)
    12. Leonora (Paer)
    13. Don Giovanni (Mozart)

    The only difference is that I'd like to squeeze Bellini's I Puritani in there someplace, and possibly Verdi's I due Foscari.
    Interesting you have Paer's Leonora and not Beethovens Leonore. However, it makes sense because Paer's version will be different where Beethoven's will be fairly similar to Fidelio. I will have to give the Paer set another spin.
    "Music is enought for a whole lifetime--but a lifetime is not enough for music." --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

  12. #97
    Senior Member Involved Member Nemorino's Avatar
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    So I have an unordered Top 10 that I usually tell myself are my 10 favorites, and in trying to order them by how much I actually do listen/watch them I discovered that these are actually my Top 10 operas that I want to see at any given time, which is not actually the same. So although it was hard to exclude some operas from this list I think my current 13 actual favorite operas based on how often I listen to the whole thing (and not just the highlights) are:

    1. Eugene Onegin (Tchaikovsky)
    2. La Traviata (Verdi)
    3. Gotterdammerung (Wagner)
    4. The Cunning Little Vixen (Janacek)
    5. Tosca (Puccini)
    6. Lohengrin (Wagner)
    7. Les Troyens (Berlioz)
    8. Don Giovanni (Mozart)
    9. Don Carlo (Verdi)
    10. Die Walkure (Wagner)
    11. Bluebeard's Castle (Bartok)
    12. La Cenerentola (Rossini)
    13. Pelleas et Melisande (Debussy)

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  14. #98
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Florestan View Post
    Interesting you have Paer's Leonora and not Beethovens Leonore. However, it makes sense because Paer's version will be different where Beethoven's will be fairly similar to Fidelio. I will have to give the Paer set another spin.
    I wasn't sure that Leonore would really be considered a separate opera from Fidelio, or it would be no. 2 on my list.

  15. #99
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    I wasn't sure that Leonore would really be considered a separate opera from Fidelio, or it would be no. 2 on my list.
    Good point, if Fidelio is a favorite, then Leonore is included by default unless you specify otherwise. I guess in a way the 1805 Leonore is a different opera than the 1814 Fidelio as is the 1869 Boris Godunov a different opera from the 1872. In both cases it is more like two versions of same opera. I skip the 1806 Leonore as it really does not have anything not found in the 1805 or 1814 versions. One thing is that the march is different in 1805 and many of the 1805 versions have the 1814 March. As I recall, the recent Jacobs release gets the correct march. But there is another Leonore, live from 1970 that was just released this year.
    https://www.amazon.com/Leonore-Various/dp/B08T623XP4/
    "Music is enought for a whole lifetime--but a lifetime is not enough for music." --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

  16. #100
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    There are also Verdi’s Jérusalem and I Lombardi, or Strauss' original and revised versions of Ariadne auf Naxos. In the first instance, Jérusalem is more than just I Lombardi with a French libretto; Verdi also eliminated a couple of characters from I Lombardi and tightened the plot action. The original version of Ariadne has the spoken-word play Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme in place of the Prologue, completely eliminating the characters of the Composer, Music Master, and Dance Master, and has a much more difficult version of Zerbinetta's aria, "Grossmächtige Prinzessin." Are the revisions actually different operas from the originals? There are also the Dresden and Paris versions of Tannhäuser . . .

  17. #101
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    There are also Verdi’s Jérusalem and I Lombardi, or Strauss' original and revised versions of Ariadne auf Naxos. In the first instance, Jérusalem is more than just I Lombardi with a French libretto; Verdi also eliminated a couple of characters from I Lombardi and tightened the plot action. The original version of Ariadne has the spoken-word play Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme in place of the Prologue, completely eliminating the characters of the Composer, Music Master, and Dance Master, and has a much more difficult version of Zerbinetta's aria, "Grossmächtige Prinzessin." Are the revisions actually different operas from the originals? There are also the Dresden and Paris versions of Tannhäuser . . .
    I have the Levine set, which must be the original as it has spiel in it. So maybe i need to get one of the revised Naxos too? Any recommendations?
    "Music is enought for a whole lifetime--but a lifetime is not enough for music." --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

  18. #102
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    Your Levine recording is of the revised 1916 version, which is the performance standard. It looks as though there are only two recordings of the 1912 original, a 1997 audio version from the Opéra de Lyon conducted by Kent Nagano, and the video from the 2012 or 2013 Salzburg Festival with Daniel Harding on the podium (and JK as Bacchus, which is the reason I purchased the DVD).




  19. #103
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAuer View Post
    Your Levine recording is of the revised 1916 version, which is the performance standard. It looks as though there are only two recordings of the 1912 original, a 1997 audio version from the Opéra de Lyon conducted by Kent Nagano, and the video from the 2012 or 2013 Salzburg Festival with Daniel Harding on the podium (and JK as Bacchus, which is the reason I purchased the DVD).
    ]
    Thanks. Great info. So I have the later version. There is not much spiel in mine, so maybe I am better off with the later version. This is sort of like Fidelio and Boris with early and later versions and the bulk of recordings being of the later versions. Oh but poor Mussorgsky has the added abuse of others re-orchestrating his opera. My Boris collection is all Mussorgsky orchestrations but for a highlights disk that is Rimskified.

    I do think i need a video of this Naxos opera, and probably of the later version before I consider delving into the early version.
    "Music is enought for a whole lifetime--but a lifetime is not enough for music." --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

  20. #104
    Opera Lively News Coordinator Top Contributor Member MAuer's Avatar
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    I have this video of the 1916 standard version and can recommend it. Susan B. Anthony (yes, that's her real name) and Jon Villars are excellent as the Prima Donna/Ariadne and Tenor/Bacchus, Iride Martinez is a fabulous Zerbinetta, and Sophie Koch is wonderful as the hyper-sensitive Composer.

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  22. #105
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    ^ Of course with the later version you posted we get Jonas Kaufmann, so maybe I need both.

    I won't go here for now, but being a Sills fan this is tempting. However, it looks like a concert performance. Also Sills does not play the lead role.
    "Music is enought for a whole lifetime--but a lifetime is not enough for music." --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

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