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Thread: Complete operas on youtube

          
   
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  1. #256
    Senior Member Involved Member Floria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dark_Angel View Post
    Great find JF52opera has fabulous youtube collection (especially the Verdi) posted in 720p HD quality!
    I have saved his youtube homepage as a "favorite"

    For Callas arias/operas in amazing sound from vinyl BJR originals check turnipoverlord youtube homepage
    Turnipoverlord has been reinstated on youtube. All his Callas recordings are available.

  2. #257
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Floria View Post
    Turnipoverlord has been reinstated on youtube. All his Callas recordings are available.
    That's interesting. Perhaps he disputed any accusation of copyright infringement and those were upheld.

    Eitherway, glad the Turnipoverlord is back (would love to know where that username comes from).

  3. #258
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    The full Mariinsky Iolanta from 2009 with Anna Netrebko is available on YouTube. No subtitles in English but this opera is extraordinarily beautiful, just listening to it is wonderful.

    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  4. #259
    Opera Lively Media Consultant Top Contributor Member Ann Lander (sospiro)'s Avatar
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    Giulio Cesare

    https://youtu.be/an_SUvpylso

    (video formatting not working but link works)
    "Every theatre is an insane asylum, but an opera theatre is the ward for the incurables."

    FRANZ SCHALK, attributed, Losing the Plot in Opera: Myths and Secrets of the World's Great Operas

  5. #260
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    Maria Stuarda-Devia/Frittoli/Antonacci (complete) 2002

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=373TUV2Yobc
    "Music is enought for a whole lifetime--but a lifetime is not enough for music." --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

  6. #261
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    It is not eweteuwb but direct from the company, however I wanted to post it in the sticky thread so it does not get lost

    **WARNING!** This is a contemporary interpretation. It is most powerful dramatization, bordering on distracting from music. I am a fully subscribed orfeo nut and have heard or seen more interpretations of this story than I can count (which actually is not alot) and would promote this as one of the best.

    http://www.lamonnaie.be/en/mymm/medi...e-et-Eurydice/

    La Monnaie ¦ Opera ¦ Orphée et Eurydice ¦ Cast
    Orphée et Eurydice

    Christoph W. Gluck / Hector Berlioz

    Music direction ¦ Hervé Niquet
    Staging, set design, lighting & costumes ¦ Romeo Castellucci
    Artistic collaboration ¦ Silvia Costa
    Dramaturgy ¦ Christian Longchamp
    Piersandra Di Matteo
    Video / Camera ¦ Vincent Pinckaers
    Chorus direction ¦ Martino Faggiani
    Youth chorus direction ¦ Benoît Giaux
    Orphée ¦ Stéphanie d'Oustrac
    Eurydice ¦ Sabine Devieilhe
    Els
    Amour ¦ Michèle Bréant (18, 20, 22 & 24 June)
    Fanny Dupont (17, 25, 27 & 29 June, 01 & 02 July)
    Orchestra & chorus ¦ La Monnaie Symphony Orchestra & Chorus
    Ombre Joyeuse ¦ Choeur de jeunes de la Monnaie, La Choraline

    **WARNING!** This is a contemporary interpretation. It is most powerful dramatization, bordering on distracting from music. I am a fully subscribed orfeo nut and have heard or seen more interpretations of this story than I can count (which actually is not alot) and would promote this as one of the best.

  7. #262
    Opera Lively Moderator Top Contributor Member Soave_Fanciulla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    It is not eweteuwb but direct from the company, however I wanted to post it in the sticky thread so it does not get lost

    **WARNING!** This is a contemporary interpretation. It is most powerful dramatization, bordering on distracting from music. I am a fully subscribed orfeo nut and have heard or seen more interpretations of this story than I can count (which actually is not alot) and would promote this as one of the best.

    http://www.lamonnaie.be/en/mymm/medi...e-et-Eurydice/

    La Monnaie ¦ Opera ¦ Orphée et Eurydice ¦ Cast
    Orphée et Eurydice

    Christoph W. Gluck / Hector Berlioz

    Music direction ¦ Hervé Niquet
    Staging, set design, lighting & costumes ¦ Romeo Castellucci
    Artistic collaboration ¦ Silvia Costa
    Dramaturgy ¦ Christian Longchamp
    Piersandra Di Matteo
    Video / Camera ¦ Vincent Pinckaers
    Chorus direction ¦ Martino Faggiani
    Youth chorus direction ¦ Benoît Giaux
    Orphée ¦ Stéphanie d'Oustrac
    Eurydice ¦ Sabine Devieilhe
    Els
    Amour ¦ Michèle Bréant (18, 20, 22 & 24 June)
    Fanny Dupont (17, 25, 27 & 29 June, 01 & 02 July)
    Orchestra & chorus ¦ La Monnaie Symphony Orchestra & Chorus
    Ombre Joyeuse ¦ Choeur de jeunes de la Monnaie, La Choraline

    **WARNING!** This is a contemporary interpretation. It is most powerful dramatization, bordering on distracting from music. I am a fully subscribed orfeo nut and have heard or seen more interpretations of this story than I can count (which actually is not a lot) and would promote this as one of the best.
    It is amazing, particularly Stéphanie d'Oustrac.
    Natalie

  8. #263
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Stéphanie d'Oustrac is a superb singer, and basically everything she is in, is worth seeing (or at least listening to - but she's a fine actress too; I don't mean this in any way that detracts from her; it's just that sometimes extreme Regie concepts *are* distracting, and she is known for starring in many such productions). So she has started singing and she is sublime as usual.

    However this parallel story is *so* distracting that I am not sure I'll be able to watch this. I have started, and the projections of the woman Els' story in English on the background while the French subtitles roll (on closed caption but the public must have the same effect; French and Dutch titles are seen, projected left and right of the stage - how would they be looking to the side and to the background to follow both lines of the story, beats me), seems like a bad, bad idea to me. This opera is good enough without superposing another story onto it. I'm aware that it's premature judgment since I've only watched the first 9 minutes so far but they were so irritating to me that it's quite likely that I won't stick around. Which might be a good thing after all because I have two interviews to transcribe.

    -----------

    I fast-forwarded, got to the part with the blurry projections... Erm... OK. Sorry guys, I'm out of here (I did listen to some of the main arias sung by Stéphanie and like I said they were great).
    Last edited by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva); April 4th, 2015 at 04:20 PM.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  9. #264
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Clayton's Avatar
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    it happens

    especially with a production like this which I think is very much a marmite (love it or hate it). I actually both love it and hate it with uncomfortably too much emotion.

    The music is superb. Stéphanie d'Oustrac has a beautiful voice and she delivers with subtle nuance the passion which works so beautifully with this production. I also very much like Dupont's Amor; it has the mischievous character removed and a sincerity and purity again, tailor made for this work. Sabine Devieilhe is a beautiful Eurydice, a human and almost tangible beauty (if that make any sense).

    I like where Hervé Niquet takes this too (but I tend to like anywhere he goes) with the over-riding factor of gentle tenderness but also with zappy and zesty sections (these are technical Clayton terms) that adds excitement. The orchestra and instrumentation and the chorus of the Monnaie are excellent; wonderful sounds and beautiful in part.

    The stage dramatization is where for most it will tend to go a bit screwy.

    When I first saw this, I had little understanding of the term regie and hated (again too much emotion for relation to an opera) anything other than strictly period interpretation. I also only thought Gluck's masterpiece was pretty music. After seeing this though, my views changed much.
    For one, I now understand that there are different ways to interpret or demonstrate that can relate some works better to some (lemurs) than more conventional translations. Here, love is shown in a human form which I had completely missed before (the opera is for a mythological, demi-god figure) and similarily the death and hell in a format that many can feel through personal experience.
    Since seeing this production I have come to love this work with a passion that makes it one of my favourite operas. In fact more, maybe I became a little bit obsessed with it. I have now heard or seen maybe eighteen different interpretations of Gluck's work and appreciated each one.
    This will not happen to all those who see this piece, probably only a few but that is music, isn't it?

  10. #265
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
    it happens

    especially with a production like this which I think is very much a marmite (love it or hate it). I actually both love it and hate it with uncomfortably too much emotion.

    The music is superb. Stéphanie d'Oustrac has a beautiful voice and she delivers with subtle nuance the passion which works so beautifully with this production. I also very much like Dupont's Amor; it has the mischievous character removed and a sincerity and purity again, tailor made for this work. Sabine Devieilhe is a beautiful Eurydice, a human and almost tangible beauty (if that make any sense).

    I like where Hervé Niquet takes this too (but I tend to like anywhere he goes) with the over-riding factor of gentle tenderness but also with zappy and zesty sections (these are technical Clayton terms) that adds excitement. The orchestra and instrumentation and the chorus of the Monnaie are excellent; wonderful sounds and beautiful in part.

    The stage dramatization is where for most it will tend to go a bit screwy.

    When I first saw this, I had little understanding of the term regie and hated (again too much emotion for relation to an opera) anything other than strictly period interpretation. I also only thought Gluck's masterpiece was pretty music. After seeing this though, my views changed much.
    For one, I now understand that there are different ways to interpret or demonstrate that can relate some works better to some (lemurs) than more conventional translations. Here, love is shown in a human form which I had completely missed before (the opera is for a mythological, demi-god figure) and similarily the death and hell in a format that many can feel through personal experience.
    Since seeing this production I have come to love this work with a passion that makes it one of my favourite operas. In fact more, maybe I became a little bit obsessed with it. I have now heard or seen maybe eighteen different interpretations of Gluck's work and appreciated each one.
    This will not happen to all those who see this piece, probably only a few but that is music, isn't it?
    The concept itself is fine, and this opera does lend itself to telling it in human fashion without just the gods and mythological figures. The problem I have with this production is the *simultaneous* attempt, which was so incredibly distracting that it completely ruined it for me. I just think it's a bad directorial decision, to have two story lines running simultaneously so that you don't know what to pay attention to - the original ancient libretto, or the modern updated story? Directors, pick one of the two, please.

    One of the problems with some productions is that they want to encompass too much with one staging.

    Like Peter Mattei was saying in his interview with me which I've just finished transcribing, he doesn't oppose extreme experimentation and even craves it; just, one needs focus. According to him, when productions are unfocused due to being too ambitious and too busy, that's when the trouble starts.

    This said, I'm passing judgment without having seen the full thing which is unfair, I know. It's just that I was unable to continue, so irritated I was with the two simultaneous story lines.

    Now, the music values, I wouldn't doubt, although I'm a little less enthusiastic than you are about the La Monnaie orchestra.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  11. #266
    Member Recent member Vlad's Avatar
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    Satyagraha, Philip Glass

    Act 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2Rm9HDk8J0
    Act 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iM_vd85HFA
    Act 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6_DJrFrGBA

    Simply not to be missed, a superb production by The Metropolitan Opera. I will likely never get to see Glass' operas in person, but this makes me feel a whole lot better about it!

  12. #267
    Opera Lively Site Owner / Administrator / Chief Editor Top Contributor Member Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vlad View Post
    Satyagraha, Philip Glass

    Act 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2Rm9HDk8J0
    Act 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iM_vd85HFA
    Act 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6_DJrFrGBA

    Simply not to be missed, a superb production by The Metropolitan Opera. I will likely never get to see Glass' operas in person, but this makes me feel a whole lot better about it!
    It's really beautiful. Satyagraha is one of the best contemporary operas ever composed, and the Met's production of it was phenomenal. I saw this one on Met Live in HD, and was lucky enough to see in person another very good Glass opera, Les Enfants Terribles.
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  13. #268
    Member Recent member Vlad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luiz Gazzola (Almaviva) View Post
    It's really beautiful. Satyagraha is one of the best contemporary operas ever composed, and the Met's production of it was phenomenal. I saw this one on Met Live in HD, and was lucky enough to see in person another very good Glass opera, Les Enfants Terribles.
    I just read your Met Live Satyagraha review, Luiz. I, too, felt Richard Croft to be 'soft.' But I don't have your ear, so I attributed it to an artistic decision and/or my own bias, accustomed to other artists singing the part. However, I found his acting, minimalist (!!!) as it was, profoundly engaging and true to the music. His performance is now canon to me.

  14. #269
    Senior Member Top Contributor Member Florestan's Avatar
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    I don't think I posted this already. This is one of my favorites, and was my introduction to Mariella Devia. Also features Ewa Podles.
    "Music is enought for a whole lifetime--but a lifetime is not enough for music." --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

  15. #270
    Junior Member Newcomer
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    ah this thread is pure gold!

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